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suntrack2
2006-Jul-29, 05:10 PM
This question was disturbing me, is it necessary to wear heavy weight cloths during the space journey always? Protection of body is quite understood, but are there any kind of technology developed after wearing lightweight dress for the space journey. And how the transitions takes place in the development of space suits?

mickal555
2006-Jul-30, 05:35 AM
I'm pretty sure you can wear whatever while your inside your spacecraft.

It's only during launch, landing and EVA that you have to suit up.

Ronald Brak
2006-Jul-30, 05:48 AM
Perhaps astronauts should go naked inside their spaceships? A mars ship isn't likely to come with a clothes washing machine and dryer so clothes would get pretty foul after a while. It might be easier just to keep the human body clean and use disposable briefs to prevent 100% nakidity. This could save on a lot of payload. The savings could be worth millions of dollars.

As for spacesuits there is another current thread on them somewhere.

mickal555
2006-Jul-30, 06:04 AM
Perhaps astronauts should go naked inside their spaceships? A mars ship isn't likely to come with a clothes washing machine and dryer so clothes would get pretty foul after a while. It might be easier just to keep the human body clean and use disposable briefs to prevent 100% nakidity. This could save on a lot of payload. The savings could be worth millions of dollars.

As for spacesuits there is another current thread on them somewhere.

Might be cold though, and the metal and stuff in the space ship would feel weird to some people.

And when they have to go on tv :lol:

They do have to keep morale up...

I suppose it could work though

WaxRubiks
2006-Jul-30, 06:17 AM
Perhaps astronauts should go naked inside their spaceships? A mars ship isn't likely to come with a clothes washing machine and dryer so clothes would get pretty foul after a while. It might be easier just to keep the human body clean and use disposable briefs to prevent 100% nakidity. This could save on a lot of payload. The savings could be worth millions of dollars.

As for spacesuits there is another current thread on them somewhere.

I think that that is a really good idea, I wonder why I haven't seen it before.

edit-But I think they could aford to wash briefs.

94z07
2006-Jul-30, 03:31 PM
I'm pretty sure that Sylvania developed the space suit so that they could go inside a vacuum chamber and perform vacuum tube experiments.

The suit must protect the body from expanding in a near vacuum. There was interest in a mechanical suit. Instead of air pressure being maintained in the suit, a mechanical suit would be more like a big Ace bandage and hold the body in. It had the advantage of being lighter and more flexible than the pressure suit. However, the problem areas of joints, crotch, and transition from mechanically protected body to pressure helmet were never overcome.

AGN Fuel
2006-Jul-31, 03:27 AM
Perhaps astronauts should go naked inside their spaceships? A mars ship isn't likely to come with a clothes washing machine and dryer so clothes would get pretty foul after a while. It might be easier just to keep the human body clean and use disposable briefs to prevent 100% nakidity. This could save on a lot of payload. The savings could be worth millions of dollars.

As for spacesuits there is another current thread on them somewhere.

When Pete Conrad and Al Bean returned from the lunar surface and rendezvoused with the CSM, Dick Gordon insisted that they strip their clothes (which were covered in lunar dust) before allowing them back in from the LM.

The mini-series "From the Earth to the Moon" captured this incident beautifully, with the naked Conrad turning to the naked Bean and noting that if the scheduled LM jettison caused a depressurisation, it would look pretty odd when they recovered the bodies!

Mickal555 is right when he notes that the suits are only required during launch, re-entry and EVA. Most of the time in the ISS, they get around in shorts and a t-shirt.

suntrack2
2006-Jul-31, 12:16 PM
thanks for the reply. do you think that a hydrogen filled gas space suit may be support to a person to float even on earth, when the hydrogen filled large balloon can float in the air, then will it possible for a man to go in the air without balloon, when already the same technique withing inbuilt of the space suit.

How much mass requires of h into that space suit to float a person on the earth. In such case man will climb in the space as per his wish. But how he will make the refilling? in such case keeping a parashute with him will be the best option!(when the H will empty from that suit)

mickal555
2006-Aug-01, 08:20 AM
thanks for the reply. do you think that a hydrogen filled gas space suit may be support to a person to float even on earth, when the hydrogen filled large balloon can float in the air, then will it possible for a man to go in the air without balloon, when already the same technique withing inbuilt of the space suit.

How much mass requires of h into that space suit to float a person on the earth. In such case man will climb in the space as per his wish. But how he will make the refilling? in such case keeping a parashute with him will be the best option!(when the H will empty from that suit)

Having a suit fulled with hydrogen wouldn't be very good on the body, and I don't think it'll give you much lift unless it was really big, in which case it would be a balloon...

Ronald Brak
2006-Aug-01, 08:31 AM
Very roughly air weighs about 1.2 kilos per square meter at sea level. Hydrogen weighs about 84 grams. To lift eighty kilos of human and balloon material would require about 90 cubic meters of gas. That's a balloon nearly 6 meters across.

neilzero
2006-Aug-01, 01:31 PM
A 22 pound =10 kilogram space suit may be possible for limited short term use. CNT = carbon nano tubes will help. Some of the features that make the suit heavier are: 1 stronger tear resistant material 2 more than 3 psi pressure for the astronaught's breathing convenience and easier transition from the space craft air pressure to the space suit pressure 3 refrigeration to keep the astronaught cool 4 heat for very cold outside temperatures. 4 water to drink 5 food to eat 6 medications that might be needed in an emergency 6 urine and excreata handling 7 comunication 8 extra oxygen in case of leak or delay in return to the space craft 9 micro meteorite protection 10 propulsion if the astronaught is detached from the spacecraft 11 I'm sure there are other desirable features of a good space suit. Neil