PDA

View Full Version : How many planets are in the solar system?



Knowledge_Seeker
2006-Jul-30, 06:08 PM
Are there officially 9, 10, or 11? Which is it.

max8166
2006-Jul-30, 06:58 PM
Or eight, if Pluto is not a planet. It all depends on the definition of planet, which is being worked upon, there is a wiki thread here with full details. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planet and this thread is all about the status of Pluto http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=44245

astromark
2006-Jul-30, 07:30 PM
Back in 1947 or whenever, They photographed a area that appeared to have a extra star. by comparing the image taken with one a few days later in a blink comparison devise they found an object that must be orbiting the sun. Not a distant star. They called it Pluto. they did not consider that it might be a lost moon of one of the other planets. So we have nine planets.

hhEb09'1
2006-Jul-30, 08:56 PM
How many planets are in the solar system? "Officially", at this point in time, nine.

Back in 1947 or whenever, 1930

grant hutchison
2006-Jul-30, 09:09 PM
1947 was Roswell. Easy mistake to make.

Grant Hutchison

PhantomWolf
2006-Jul-30, 09:12 PM
they did not consider that it might be a lost moon of one of the other planets.

Actually this is wrong too. At first there was a lot of speculation that it was a moon lost from Neptune since when its orbit was established it was found to cross Neptune's path. However when it was determined that they never cross close to each other and that Pluto had its own moon, this idea was dropped.

Knowledge_Seeker
2006-Jul-30, 10:40 PM
isn't the planet definition supposed to come out this october or november?

hhEb09'1
2006-Jul-31, 08:10 AM
isn't the planet definition supposed to come out this october or november?redefinition :)

astromark
2006-Jul-31, 10:23 AM
All of the above, thanks and true.

( must remember 1930 )

We have done all this in another thread. So at what size does an Oort cloud object become a planet. Or when does an asteroid become a planet. Might it be right to call the Oort cloud objects Planetary debris. ? Moons? or what,?

five_distinct
2006-Jul-31, 05:46 PM
Hm, according to a quote on the talk page for Planet:


Actually Pluto already has lost its status as a planet, it just hasnt been made widely known. I havent put it in the article because at this moment I cant remember the source well enough, but I can give you a vague idea of where to look if your interested. On an episode of The Colbert Report, Stephen Colbert interviewed an astronomer from the IAU who stated that pluto has officialy been removed from the list of planets. I cant remember the astronemers name which is why I havent put it up yet, but i'll look into it.--Mloren 23:35, 14 July 2006 (UTC)


I'm gonna google around and see if I can find that particular interview.

Knowledge_Seeker
2006-Jul-31, 11:47 PM
im not sure if many of you know this but:

NEIL deGRASSE TYSON: Did you know that in 1801 a new planet was discovered orbiting between Mars and Jupiter? They called it Ceres. And they looked some more, and they found another planet, and another and another. The count of planets in the early 1800s was greater than it is today, thirteen planets in the solar system. And they kept looking, and the numbers kept growing. And they were running out of names, and they realized that, rather than counting new planets, they had discovered a new swath of real estate in the solar system called the asteroid belt.

hhEb09'1
2006-Aug-01, 06:42 AM
I'm gonna google around and see if I can find that particular interview.You're citing the Colbert report? About the IAU? :)

The IAU has a website, and this is their latest release about the subject (http://www.iau.org/STATUS_OF_PLUTO.238.0.html), I think. Pluto hasn't been demoted by them yet.

jseefcoot
2006-Aug-01, 02:43 PM
im not sure if many of you know this but:

NEIL deGRASSE TYSON: Did you know that in 1801 a new planet was discovered orbiting between Mars and Jupiter? They called it Ceres. And they looked some more, and they found another planet, and another and another. The count of planets in the early 1800s was greater than it is today, thirteen planets in the solar system. And they kept looking, and the numbers kept growing. And they were running out of names, and they realized that, rather than counting new planets, they had discovered a new swath of real estate in the solar system called the asteroid belt.


See? We have historical precedent. And it seems like I've heard this story before but had forgotten it until now. This is a good example of why this is an issue now. We have learned some new things in recent decades that call into question our previous understanding and it is time to review the body of evidence, and perhaps redefine what we know.

Now, if we could only get our government(s) to operate this way. . . . .