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obscured by clouds
2006-Aug-16, 04:06 AM
I have two possible issues with the International Astronomical Union or whoever is responsible for this oversight, or laps in judgement. I am new so I can only assume that I am wrong or that I am not the first, but here we go;

1. Our Sun is named the 'Sun'. Now that is just really silly. But still I think we can do better then that.

2. Again our Solar System is called 'our Solar System" (part of the local group?). I know we're the only one FOR NOW, but I think we can do better.



I am all so sure that changes dont happen very quickly or even at all, but I am patience. :D

WaxRubiks
2006-Aug-16, 04:13 AM
1. Our Sun is named the 'Sun'. Now that is just really silly. But still I think we can do better then that.


I think that it is also called Sol, hence Solarsystem.

01101001
2006-Aug-16, 04:43 AM
1. Our Sun is named the 'Sun'. Now that is just really silly. But still I think we can do better then that.

2. Again our Solar System is called 'our Solar System" (part of the local group?). I know we're the only one FOR NOW, but I think we can do better.
We've kicked this one around, too.

At least:

Topic Naming the moon (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=589869)
Article (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=45386#post45386) in topic sol (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=2987)

Tim Thompson
2006-Aug-16, 04:44 AM
Indeed, the proper name of our star is Sol (with an upper case 'S'), whereas the sun (with a lower case 's') is only a descriptor. Hence, the solar system is derived from the proper name, though it is spelled with lower case, and is a descriptor, not a proper name. So far as I know, the solar system does not have a distinct proper name. It might be interesting to ponder what such a name should be, if anything other than Solar System.

obscured by clouds
2006-Aug-16, 04:57 AM
Thanks for the links 01101001,



Not so concerned about what the name could be, but why is there none to begin with.


Reading the links I fell better about Sol now though that is just a place holder. ;)

Celestial Mechanic
2006-Aug-16, 05:07 AM
And what about our planet being called "Earth"? ;)

wollery
2006-Aug-16, 05:33 AM
Correct proper name for our solar system is Sol system.

Jens
2006-Aug-16, 06:39 AM
Indeed, the proper name of our star is Sol (with an upper case 'S'), whereas the sun (with a lower case 's') is only a descriptor.

I thought the proper name was 太阳, pronounced taijaŋ. :)

neilzero
2006-Aug-28, 03:59 AM
According to the book Urantia, which was likely chaneled by a nephew of the Kellogg famous for corn flakes (Battle Creek, Michigan) the proper name of Earth is Urantia.

astromark
2006-Aug-28, 06:18 AM
These other names are not excepted as the normal English given name of the target object. ie, The star nearest to us Sol. Earth is part of that stars planetary disk. The solar system. rightly or wrongly. That is a fact. The central star of this solar system is often refereed to as our sun. The name of this planet is Earth. Planet Earth is often used. No I do not see a issue here.
Other cultures and ethnic groups may well have names for these objects. They are not wrong, just different. For those of us that use languages other than English, this is just the way things are. Earth does not need another name. It has many. I saw the OO above and can only sagest that person get over the Star trek syndrome. Sorry that looks a little hard now that I read it. I do not wish to provoke argument, just a comment. Every race and culture has the right to call or name any object as they wish., but in this scientific community we use the English language (In my case badly). lol. . .

Jeff Root
2006-Aug-28, 07:40 AM
I didn't realize how much I've been wanting to do this...

Astromark, I agree with everything you said!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

(Although I suppose we could name the Earth "Mark I".)

Jens
2006-Aug-28, 07:56 AM
Yes, me three. My comment to the OP would be, what does it matter that they call it "sun" rather than "sol" or whatever? Because essentially, there are several thousand human languages, and the decision of the IAU is not really to set the English-language name, but rather to define concepts which will then be translated into the languages of the earth. So the terminology "sun" versus "sol" is really the key issue. The key issue is that scientists, from a variety of linguistic backgrounds (not all astronomers are American or British, BTW) can easily understand what is being stated. And I don't think "sun" is any more difficult to understand than "sol."

Now, if English speakers want to get together and decide on names, fine, but remember that Americans use "elevator" to refer to what should properly be called a "lift." :shifty:

Gillianren
2006-Aug-28, 08:55 AM
According to the book Urantia, which was likely chaneled by a nephew of the Kellog famous for corn flakes; the proper name of Earth is Urantia.

Well, that settles it, then! (Kellogg with two g's--they're family of mine, albeit somewhat distantly.)

Tog
2006-Aug-28, 10:18 AM
Now, if English speakers want to get together and decide on names, fine, but remember that Americans use "elevator" to refer to what should properly be called a "lift." :shifty:

Not to be confused with "left", the first syllable in lieutenant.:p

But I thought "Solar System" WAS the Star Trek way of doing things. I assume that Rigel VII is found around the star Rigel, in the Rigel System. and that it was only after we meet them and say "So... Where are we?" that would find that we couldn't pronounce the name used by the natives and have to maintain the name Rigel VII until such time as they accepted our language as the universal one.:whistle:

Ozzy
2006-Aug-28, 10:46 AM
Would a star with orbiting planets be called a solar system or does that only refer to the Sol system.

i.e. Would an Alpha Centauriian system be called an Alpha system or a solar system?

eburacum45
2006-Aug-28, 12:29 PM
Other 'solar systems' are best referred to as 'Planetary systems' in my opinion.
Here are a few examples of real multiple planet systems which have already been discovered;
http://www.extrasolar.net/startour.asp?StarID=2
http://www.extrasolar.net/startour.asp?starid=4
http://www.extrasolar.net/startour.asp?starid=74
http://www.extrasolar.net/startour.asp?starid=3

Kaptain K
2006-Sep-03, 02:26 PM
According to the book Urantia, which was likely chaneled by a nephew of the Kellog famous for corn flakes; the proper name of Earth is Urantia.
The 606th planet of the Satania constellation to evolve intelligent life.

Ken G
2006-Sep-04, 02:07 AM
Yeah, but they were wrong about that. It was only the 605th. They were counting the place that Kellogg came from (no offense, Gillianren).

Attiyah Zahdeh
2006-Sep-04, 02:22 AM
I have two possible issues with the International Astronomical Union or whoever is responsible for this oversight, or laps in judgement. I am new so I can only assume that I am wrong or that I am not the first, but here we go;

1. Our Sun is named the 'Sun'. Now that is just really silly. But still I think we can do better then that.

2. Again our Solar System is called 'our Solar System" (part of the local group?). I know we're the only one FOR NOW, but I think we can do better.



I am all so sure that changes dont happen very quickly or even at all, but I am patience. :D.
Hi OBC,

I see that the real names and the right answers are all still "obscured by clouds". It is just the same thing as your real name.

Gillianren
2006-Sep-04, 03:33 AM
Yeah, but they were wrong about that. It was only the 605th. They were counting the place that Kellogg came from (no offense, Gillianren).

Hey, I'm not close enough kin to 'em to be lawsuit happy; be grateful!

Ken G
2006-Sep-04, 03:08 PM
They couldn't get any money out of me though-- they couldn't prove me wrong!

GOURDHEAD
2006-Sep-05, 12:14 AM
Would a star with orbiting planets be called a solar system It seems that "stellar system" has been used and and fits the bill quite well. Stellar system, when applied to multiple star systems, would include each of the stars and each of the planets orbiting each star.