PDA

View Full Version : Photogenic memory



suntrack2
2006-Aug-22, 05:27 PM
In the coming generation:

I don't know "of what exactly effecting on the brains of the childrens of this new generation" their memory found most remarkable, in one instance when I was giving hint to my wife about a paper weight at which place she kept that, since it was missing, but my little daughter 3 year old picked my finger at took me at the place where that paper weight was, I was much surprised, that how she found that thing which was missing since yesterday.

In many instance I found my friends, relatives kids brilliant in replying the questions, found brilliant in colour awareness, words awareness, general knowledge awareness, television programs and as well as sports they mostly play.

These childrens were giving me the answers in series, no question they kept unturned, I was kept my finger in mouth, I was so much surprised by their memory's acts. In different cases particularly in adults of ages 70-80 years, their memory also found quite photogenic!.

I am in search of the number of different instances of photogenic memories.

sunil

Doodler
2006-Aug-22, 05:37 PM
I believe you mean "photographic"

suntrack2
2006-Aug-23, 11:53 AM
yes doodler, but photogenic word I have mostly heard here. but have you witnessed some instance of that?


sunil

Tog
2006-Aug-23, 12:10 PM
Photogenic means it looks good in pictures, or that it phographs well. Rita Hayworth was photogenic. Ernest Borgnine... not so much.

Photographic, means to record an image. A person can have a photographic memory, but a photogenic one would need an actual, physical object or person.

suntrack2
2006-Aug-23, 12:12 PM
that's nice tog for bringing clearity in the concept here.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Aug-23, 12:42 PM
I read about a study in some quasi-scientific journal or another that photographic memory is actually quite rare; that a lot of visual-spatial thinkers believe themselves to have it - but they don't. This has piqued my interest - time to search.

Jens
2006-Aug-24, 07:32 AM
Suntrack,

I understand what you're asking. One thing to think about, based on my own experience of having young children: three year olds don't have to think about all the day to day affairs that adults worry about, so sometimes they remember something that we have all forgotten. So it may be an age issue rather than some change over time.

Maksutov
2006-Aug-24, 07:39 AM
My ex-wife used to claim I had pornographic memory. She had photographic memory for ads run by expensive stores. That was then followed by a shopographic binge that was downright obscene. ;)

farmerjumperdon
2006-Aug-24, 01:46 PM
Interesting how memory works. And that it may work differently for kids than adults. Was chatting with some friends last evening and one of them (in early 20's) claimed their earliest memory was from age 6. That seems quite old. If I remember correctly from an earlier thread, most folks can remember events from about age 3.

What I find fascinating is how the earlier memories are getting harder to retrieve, and come through with less detail and a wierd level of uncertainty. I'm 50, and I remember not many years ago having lots of very clear and detailed memories from age 10 and back. It was as if I were to sit and start writing I could pretty much document my childhood with a very high level of completeness. Can't say the same now; there would definitely be gaps and forgotten events.

Better start writing before too long.

suntrack2
2006-Aug-24, 02:24 PM
glad to meet you, farmerjumperdon, in the age 50 the past memories in individual case may be reflect some few light, upon what was happened in the past, or say it is difficult to recall all the things from the very small age, the cause behind this thing is not any forgetfullness, but the events which was completed in the past and those were not so much of importance then our brain forgets all the things, inshort brain itself filters and hilights the important events in our past life, but age is not the problem to recall the past memories even a 90 years old person also looks able to recall the things, but he mostly fail to ascertain the info of very early ages, it is may be due to dimensia like problem, or weak nurons.

I heard that almond is best for brain of all ages, the almond oil is the best for brain, I don't the reason but people of old age at my home were telling long back about almond story. It is also best to take almond with milk, or purely almond, the almond must well in quality.

thanks for your comment.

sunil

farmerjumperdon
2006-Aug-24, 04:24 PM
Ahhhh. Too bad I can't grow almond trees in Wisconsin.

Yeah, it is the less important anecdotes that seem to be drifting away. The important moments, like the stuff that really made an impression, helped shape core beliefs, are still clear as a bell.

sarongsong
2006-Aug-24, 10:11 PM
...I heard that almond is best for brain of all ages...You might want to look into blueberries (http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=en&q=blueberries+brain&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8), too.
In California's San Joaquin Valley---a prime almond-growing area---the locals pronounce them "ammuns" ... http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon7.gif

suntrack2
2006-Aug-25, 02:09 PM
thanks sarong, for the ammuns. it is pretty delicious and riched with powerful ingredients.

sunil

and one more word: thanks for the link.

mugaliens
2006-Aug-25, 07:21 PM
I have a semi-photographic memory. That is, if I've seen something before, I can generally recall most of the details. I tend to convert verbal converstations to images with associated meaning. As a result, I'm not often directly quoting an individual when I later remember it, but I'm paraphrasing the intent based off the image I have of the situation.

suntrack2
2006-Aug-26, 09:41 AM
thanks mugaliens for the reply in "semi" photographic memory. interesting fun you did, well mugaliens the question for you here " do you always falling dreams and in which colour, I mean in black and white or colourful dreamings?
I am taking your different test for your IQ. I will do some analysis of your answer for this question and then I will tell you your IQ. your IQ in my opinion is up to 95% out 100 marks I have set for you. (because you are converting verbal conversations into the images it is pretty difficult for a common man), so there is something hidden point in your IQ. Interesting though. :)

sunil

Ronald Brak
2006-Aug-27, 03:34 AM
There are many people with very good memories, but very few people with actual photographic memories, and even these people generally don't retain their "photos" over time. The test for photographic memory to to seperately show someone two pictures that look like random mess and which only make an image when both are combined in a person's mind.

mugaliens
2006-Aug-27, 03:38 PM
thanks mugaliens for the reply in "semi" photographic memory. interesting fun you did, well mugaliens the question for you here " do you always falling dreams and in which colour, I mean in black and white or colourful dreamings?
I am taking your different test for your IQ. I will do some analysis of your answer for this question and then I will tell you your IQ. your IQ in my opinion is up to 95% out 100 marks I have set for you. (because you are converting verbal conversations into the images it is pretty difficult for a common man), so there is something hidden point in your IQ. Interesting though. :)

sunil

Dream in color: Yes

I've rarely had dreams of falling, but occasionally have dreams of flying (self-levitating).

MrClean
2006-Aug-27, 05:56 PM
Overheard from an IQ Perv, "Man the womans got a good looking memory."

suntrack2
2006-Aug-29, 10:48 AM
thanks mrclean for your response, you are looking dreams of "flying" that's a good thing, you are looking more ambitious in nature! @

:)

sunil

HenrikOlsen
2006-Aug-29, 01:48 PM
Dream in color: Yes
I recently had a dream that was in text, black on white, large serif font.
I was actually reading the text describing what was happening in the dream rather than experiencing it directly.
Even stranger, the text was in english.

suntrack2
2006-Aug-30, 11:33 AM
wow its nice henrik, your dream was in black and white and in a particular font, ( so at that particular day whether you were typing a large work in the serif font?, then it is possible) in english too. :)

dreaming in black and white is rare one, it is just a old movie like of the very past (i.e of 1950s)!

Stregone
2006-Aug-31, 07:26 AM
I recently had a dream that was in text, black on white, large serif font.
I was actually reading the text describing what was happening in the dream rather than experiencing it directly.
Even stranger, the text was in english.

Hmm, play MUDs much? I know several people who were very heavy MUD players, who had text based dreams.

suntrack2
2006-Aug-31, 08:56 AM
I have seen many people give instant answer on mathematics. When their teacher or lecturer asks them a question, these people were originally expert in physics, it means the physics people can give instant answers on mathematics, but who have done specialization in mathematics sometime unable to give the answer of physics related question.

Even the people who are originated of biology/zoology/chemistry etc are found unable to tell on the basics of physics. (It may be possible due to their total concentration on a particular topic in vast)

Or what would be the cause of their difficulties? May be they have studied but they can't reply the questions as well, but when we ask them what you have played and eat they found very correct in their answers. :)

Sunil

HenrikOlsen
2006-Aug-31, 09:36 AM
Hmm, play MUDs much? I know several people who were very heavy MUD players, who had text based dreams.
Not for several years, I was High Lord (überadmin==root on server) on the Discworld MUD for a while a long time ago, and still consider LPC to have one of the best programming environments I've experienced.