PDA

View Full Version : STS-115 EVA Thread



Cylinder
2006-Aug-26, 10:22 AM
The following EVA descriptions are taken from the STS-115 Press Kit (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/154433main_sts115_press_kit3.pdf) [3.2Mb PDF] - a must read for anyone closely following the Atlantis mission. The calendar dates shown assume STS-115 launches on Monday, August 28, 2006.

[Moderator note: EVA dates have been updated as of today's launch (Sept 9th)]

EVA-1: Flight Day 4 - Tuesday, September 12th.


During the first EVA, the crew will prepare the truss for activation and prepare the solar arrays for deployment.

As Tanner and Piper prepare for the spacewalk, Steve MacLean and Jeff Williams will use the station’s robotic arm to slowly move the 17-and-a-half ton P3/P4 truss to the port side of the integrated truss system. They will align it using a television camera and then mate it to P1.

Once Tanner and Piper have left the airlock, they will move to the newly installed truss. Upon a “go” from Mission Control that the proper electrical inhibits are in place, Tanner will connect the power cables in the P1-to-P3 lower utility tray, where the electrical connections are housed. He will also close the number 7 Circuit Interrupt Devices. Upon completion, Tanner will give the ground control team a “go” to begin the activation of the P3/P4 truss. Piper will also be working on the P3/P4 truss. Her first task will be to release the aft and forward Solar Array Blanket Box (SABB) launch restraints, unbolting the SABBs from the Integrated Equipment Assembly. The SABBs hold the folded solar arrays. Piper will release the aft SABB first.

EVA-2: Flight Day 5 - Wednesday, September 13th.


On flight day 5, Burbank and MacLean will continue preparing the SARJ for rotation by releasing and removing 16 launch locks, six of 10 outer launch restraints.

The launch locks and launch restraints constrain the SARJ and handle loads during ascent. All of the launch locks must be removed before any of the launch restraints can be removed. In addition, the drive lock assemblies must be deployed to provide a method of controlling uncontrolled SARJ rotation.

Both Burbank and MacLean will work simultaneously to remove the launch locks. Each launch lock is located under a separate insulation cover which is in turn connected to the SARJ inboard bulkhead by four to six bolts, and connected to the outboard bulkhead by one to three spring‐loaded clamp bolts. The cover must be removed to access the launch lock. After removing the cover, the launch lock is removed by releasing four bolts. Once the launch lock is removed, the cover is replaced and reattached to the SARJ inboard bulkhead. The outboard spring clamp bolts are left open to allow for SARJ rotation.

After the launch locks are removed, Burbank and MacLean will begin removing the SARJ launch restraints. These restraints hold together the inner and outer SARJ bulkheads. There are two additional launch restraints holding the forward face nadir and zenith SARJ stub rails to the inboard SARJ bulkhead as well as two additional launch restraints on aft truss beams. The final task of EVA 2 will be the deployment of the SARJ brace beams. These beams are located on the P3 inboard side of the SARJ. These beams also help rigidize the SARJ interface.

EVA-3: Flight Day 7, Friday, September 15th.


On flight day 7, Tanner and Piper will again don their spacesuits for the third and final spacewalk.

EVA-3 consists of 6 1/2 hours of truss systems installation, including


the P6 beta gimbal assembly (BGA),
the P4 PVR, a photo-voltaic or heat-dissipating radiator,
an S1 S-band antenna support assembly (SASA),
the string 1 baseband signal processor (BSP),
the antenna group interface tube (AGIT) heat shield,
the Materials for ISS Experiment (MISSE)


For a play-by-play on EVA-3, see the press kit linked above - as well as for payload illustrations and descriptions.

ToSeek
2006-Aug-26, 07:59 PM
Be interesting to see just how bright the ISS is from the ground once they've installed all this.

Wolverine
2006-Aug-26, 08:35 PM
Launch Postponed (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)


The Space Shuttle Mission Management Team decided Saturday afternoon to postpone the launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis for at least 24 hours to allow more time for teams to assess ground and flight systems following a strong lighting strike to the lighting protection system at the launch pad on Friday afternoon.

Grand_Lunar
2006-Aug-27, 12:48 AM
Darn, you be me to it, Wolverine!

BTW, have you seen the different introductions welcoming us to NASA.gov?
One is Neil Armstrong (so much for the HBer's claim of him not making public appearences), another Leonard Nimoy (with the original 1701 preceding), and last is the robot from 'Lost in Space'.

It helped ease the disapointment of the postponement of the launch.

Cylinder
2006-Aug-27, 05:31 AM
Fixed dates to reflect new launch window. I'm becoming a bit concerned about the fringes of Ernesto now.

ETA: Monday should be OK as far as Ernesto is concerned.

Grand_Lunar
2006-Aug-27, 11:23 AM
Yeah, I'm worried about that thing. Hope it doesn't interfer. Closest approach to FL is early Wensday morning.

Wolverine
2006-Aug-27, 12:52 PM
Ernesto's getting ugly (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at5+shtml/120341.shtml?tswind120).

Cylinder
2006-Aug-27, 01:53 PM
It looks increasingly likely that a Monday launch is the final window until late October. NASA will announce in the 10AM presser today if Atlantis is cleared for launch or rolled back to the VAB for hurricane contingency.

Fingers crossed!

Glom
2006-Aug-27, 05:01 PM
The P6 is currently sitting on top of the Z0 truss. Will it be moved into to the end of the port truss after this?

pghnative
2006-Aug-27, 06:00 PM
It looks increasingly likely that a Monday launch is the final window until late October. NASA will announce in the 10AM presser today if Atlantis is cleared for launch or rolled back to the VAB for hurricane contingency.

Fingers crossed!Did you mis-type? According to this (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html), the flight is scheduled for Tuesday.

Could be more information imminent -- briefing at 2:00 EDT (that's right now) on NASA-TV -- too bad I can't get NASA-TV to work on my home computer.

Cylinder
2006-Aug-27, 08:27 PM
Did you mis-type? According to this (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html), the flight is scheduled for Tuesday.

Yea - I'd take NASA's own word over mine. :)

pghnative
2006-Aug-28, 01:14 PM
According to my local newspaper, NASA has a launch window till ~ mid September. If they miss that, then they would have to launch at night, which is undesirable since it makes foam shedding difficult to see. Thus the potential delay until late October.

However, the Russians have a shipment scheduled for mid-September also, so NASA wants to launch the shuttle before Sept 7th to avoid conflicts. (Apparantly Russia cannot delay either, since then they'd be landing at night, which is undesirable for a reason not mentioned in the article.)

Cylinder
2006-Sep-09, 03:41 PM
Since my edit window seems to have expired. perhaps a mod would be kind enough to fix the EVA dates in the OP. Thanks. :)

Cylinder
2006-Sep-09, 03:45 PM
Flight Day 4 = Tuesday, September 12
Flight Day 5 = Wednesday, September 13
Flight Day 7 = Friday, September 15

Wolverine
2006-Sep-09, 06:23 PM
OP fixed.

Roy Batty
2006-Sep-09, 08:02 PM
And Atlantis, we are looking good for a smooth transition from the STS-115 Launch thread (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=46210) to the EVA one .... :)

Cylinder
2006-Sep-12, 04:39 PM
I missed most of EVA-1 coverage, but it seems like Tanner and Piper made easy work of installing the truss assembly. They are now in the re-pressurized airlock doing some housekeeping chores. Hopefully NASA-TV will replay the highlights today.

EVA-2 is scheduled to begin tomorrow at 4AM CDT. Once things are cleaned up, Mission Specialists Dan Burbank and Steve MacLean will make their way into the airlock and "camp out" overnight at 10.2 PSI. Steve MacLean today became the first Canadian astronaut to operate the Space Station Remote Manipulator System and tomorrow will become only the second Canadian astronaut to perform a space walk.

EVA-2 will focus on preparing the Solar Array Rotary Joint (SARJ) in advance of Wednesday's solar array deployment. The SARJ allows the ISS solar arrays to remain pointed toward the sun by rotating like a Ferris wheel. A photo and description of the SARJ interface can be found on Page 33 of the media kit along with the other payload components.

Swift
2006-Sep-12, 08:03 PM
From CNN.com (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

Spacewalking astronauts worried they may have gummed up a successful job connecting an addition to the international space station Tuesday when a bolt, spring and washer floated free.

Astronaut Joe Tanner was working with the bolt when it sprang loose, floated over the head of Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper and skittered across the 17 1/2-ton box-like truss that they were hooking up.


The free-flying bolt marred an otherwise successful and speedy spacewalk Tuesday morning.

Tanner and Piper zipped through a jam-packed list of arduous but mundane construction tasks, putting NASA ahead of schedule in connecting the addition. With extra time, Mission Control assigned them half a dozen extra jobs of bolt removing and cover unlatching that would have been part of a Thursday spacewalk.

That's when the bolt got lost.

Doodler
2006-Sep-12, 08:07 PM
Eh, stuff happens?

Nicolas
2006-Sep-12, 09:20 PM
I assume this is no show stopping error at all. If it is, who forgot it's humans doing the spacewalk?

Letting go of a bolt should be something that has (ignoring freak accidents) no further consequences than the need to take a spare bolt in a spacewalk.

Doodler
2006-Sep-12, 11:17 PM
I assume this is no show stopping error at all. If it is, who forgot it's humans doing the spacewalk?

Letting go of a bolt should be something that has (ignoring freak accidents) no further consequences than the need to take a spare bolt in a spacewalk.

I've worked in the construction industry here planetside, and lemme tell you about how many bolts we overbuy to cover for the inevitable "whoops" four stories up...

Swift
2006-Sep-13, 02:43 AM
I've worked in the construction industry here planetside, and lemme tell you about how many bolts we overbuy to cover for the inevitable "whoops" four stories up...
It was unclear from the article, but my impression from the second quote from the story in the message above ("bolt removing") was that this was not a bolt for attaching something that needed attaching, but was a bolt holding a cover on. If so, they only concern is the bolt as drifting space debris, not that they needed the bolt.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-13, 08:05 AM
Yup indeed Swift. The NASA site is clear in its description. They needed to remove that cover anyway, but they don't like things floating around of course. Oh well, it didn't hit anything.

Seeing such an EVA is intense, with all parts banging around on their lifelines...

Grand_Lunar
2006-Sep-13, 01:41 PM
Got the EVA on NASA TV right now. Looks like a bolt is giving trouble. Both astronauts are working on it, holding and working the rachet.
Quite fun, seeing these guys do a space bound version of what I've done for years in the navy.

Cylinder
2006-Sep-13, 04:06 PM
Burbank and MacLean are now making there way into the Quest airlock and closing out EVA-2. Solar panel deployement is set for tommorow and EVA-3 with Mission Specialists Tanner and Piper is set for Thursday.

Good work, all!

LunarOrbit
2006-Sep-13, 04:38 PM
Burbank and MacLean have just finished their EVA. Apparently MacLean lost a bolt also. Oops.

Congratulations, Steve, on becoming the second Canadian to perform an EVA.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-13, 05:13 PM
Losing a bolt gives the EVA charm :).

It's not a prefered action, but considering the dangers and difficulties of an EVA, it is a very mnor mishap.

No negative comments on the astronauts from me, at least not until I've performed multiple array attaching actions in a clumsy suit, hanging in a zero g vacuum, making sure I don't float towards certain death..and never having lost a bolt :).

Doodler
2006-Sep-13, 07:04 PM
It was unclear from the article, but my impression from the second quote from the story in the message above ("bolt removing") was that this was not a bolt for attaching something that needed attaching, but was a bolt holding a cover on. If so, they only concern is the bolt as drifting space debris, not that they needed the bolt.

Ahh, so much the better.

Roy Batty
2006-Sep-14, 12:23 PM
Some great shots of the solar panels being deployed at the moment guys!

Grand_Lunar
2006-Sep-14, 01:20 PM
Looks like another success!

Roy Batty
2006-Sep-17, 01:11 PM
Undocked as per schedule 15 minutes ago, flyby of the station commences in another 15.

Maksutov
2006-Sep-17, 01:35 PM
Undocked as per schedule 15 minutes ago, flyby of the station commences in another 15.I remember watching the ISS go over just after an STS undocking about four years ago. What a sight to see those two bright lights getting farther apart by the minute!

Safe trip home, Atlantis!

Roy Batty
2006-Sep-17, 05:22 PM
:) Nice flyby, Good landing Atlantis! (Wednesday).

Nicolas
2006-Sep-17, 11:25 PM
Any pics of the enlarged ISS available yet?

Hamlet
2006-Sep-18, 12:22 AM
Any pics of the enlarged ISS available yet?

There are a few here (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060917undocking/index3.html) from the Atlantis fly around.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-18, 07:33 AM
ooohhh... there was I hoping to see a symmetrical solar panel layout. Does the other "wing" set of panels still needs to be attached, or is it cancelled?

Well, still it became a bit larger, which is a good thing to see! Finish that beast :).

Hamlet
2006-Sep-18, 05:56 PM
ooohhh... there was I hoping to see a symmetrical solar panel layout. Does the other "wing" set of panels still needs to be attached, or is it cancelled?

Well, still it became a bit larger, which is a good thing to see! Finish that beast :).

The counterpart to the recently installed P3/P4 truss, the S3/S4 (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/fdf/manifest.html) truss, is scheduled to go on STS-117 in late February 2007.

Nicolas
2006-Sep-19, 08:56 AM
I understand the central one is just a temporary, as it will be retracted? Does that mean they're taking it back to earth?

The sequence looks good, it will look a bit like the plans in the end :)

WHarris
2006-Sep-19, 04:35 PM
I understand the central one is just a temporary, as it will be retracted? Does that mean they're taking it back to earth?


It will be retracted, but it will be moved to the end of the P3/P4 solar array on a later shuttle flight.

See here (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/fdf/manifest.html) for further details on the construction schedule.