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Nereid
2006-Aug-29, 12:59 AM
Which are the nearest starburst galaxies?

Is there a measure of the degree to which a galaxy may be classified as 'starburst'? For example, estimated (annual) rate of formation of new stars.

To what extent is the initial mass (or luminosity) function of (newly formed) stars in such galaxies (or, the starburst regions of same) assumed vs measured?

RussT
2006-Aug-29, 09:18 AM
Here are several very interesting papers dealing with some of this.

http://www.astro.uni-bonn.de/~webgk/ws98/thuan_r.html

http://www.xs4all.nl/~carlkop/backyard.html

http://lanl.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0406205

astromark
2006-Aug-29, 10:40 AM
Assumed vs measured?

A great deal of astronomical findings are based on what could be described as questionable findings.
What you need to consider is that with the weight of evidence probability becomes fact... well nearly. Might be better to use words like highly likely or almost certainly. and...
When you mention star forming galaxies? would it be more accurate to use star forming region. After all do not most galaxies have regions of differing activates?
Yes Russt. those links cover all this. Better than I will. interesting subject these new star regions are.

RussT
2006-Aug-29, 10:49 AM
Yes, and in addition I am seeing more and more papers talking about 'isolated galaxies and their star formation, where it has generally been considered that it takes galaxy merger/interact to promote most star birth.

Blob
2006-Aug-29, 11:14 AM
Hum,
M82, NGC253, and NGC4945 are a few of the the nearest starburst galaxies.
A close active galaxy is NGC 5128 (Centaurus A).
A distance based on Cepheid variables was worked out at 3.42 0.18 (random) 0.25 (systematic) Mpc.
The magnitude 7.0 galaxy is situated in the M83 group of galaxies.

Have a look at this link which may help you.

http://www.mpifr-bonn.mpg.de/div/mm/research_projects/galaxies.html