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suntrack2
2006-Aug-31, 09:33 AM
I am asking "what is your favourite hobby" : I like painting, chess, mountaineering, walking, swimming, badminton, table tennis, yoga, meditation, debating and lecture.

Keeping lot of hobbies means I am not intelligent in the above fields, do you think that our intelligence is mainly hilighted by our hobbies. Or there is a little bit reflection comes on the intelligence of our "keeping hobbies", or it is just besides the intelligence of a own to keep and maintain the hobbies?

I like to run the vehicle with a speed of maximum 60kmph, (as far as my vehicle running hobby is concern, infact this is not a hobby, it is a part of daily routine, but I am inserting the same work in the "hobby".

So what would you like to add here, I am much interested to know more than expected. :)

Sunil

captain swoop
2006-Aug-31, 11:44 AM
Mountain Biking and Model railways! hhm!

Argos
2006-Aug-31, 12:42 PM
Remote Control aircraft models, Sunil. :)

MrClean
2006-Aug-31, 12:49 PM
Really Cool Model Aircraft of Free Flight, Control Line and Radio Controlled types.

I also run a lot at the gym, but that's health related not a hobby. I spend more time doing it than my hobby, but its NOT my hobby. Running probably isn't a good description either, hobbling about or continually falling down might be better. I can't do 6 mph for more than 5 minutes and spend most of the time between 5.3 and 5.5 mph. I have several 5K benefits that I'm going for here in the next month so every day it's 40 minutes of running on the treadmill, cept for Saturday and Sunday when I run at the park.

But RUNNING isn't my HOBBY. Sigh...

farmerjumperdon
2006-Aug-31, 12:58 PM
Used to love the model railroading. Sold a rather large collection during one of my financially strapped 20-something years.

Skydiving is #1 of course. I spend a lot of time gardening and landscaping (the fenced yard part of our property is just under 3 acres). Carpentry was big for me, though with kids activities kicking in (they are 6 and 9) and the bulk of our home pretty squared away, that one only occupies a small part of my time these days. Coaching kids sports is work and fun (I guess that most hobbies are) and probably comes in #3 after the yard.

My more sedentary interests are astronomy, chess & other games, collecting stamps, old books on certain topics & LP's; reading a good amount, and writing a little.

Lurker
2006-Aug-31, 07:33 PM
Role playing at renaissance faires... :)

BigDon
2006-Aug-31, 07:37 PM
Reffereeing role playing games and tropical fish keeping.

A.DIM
2006-Aug-31, 08:38 PM
I read, write, hike/camp, gardening, disc golf...

I play music often, whether keyboards/piano or on my vintage electric kit.

RC boats in my pond (actually my youngest son's), and sailing a 24' at KY Lake whenever the opportunity arises.

soylentgreen
2006-Aug-31, 09:37 PM
Civil War re-enactment, urban archaeology, film scoring, backyard astronomy, front porch cultural history*(a sub-obsession of my obsession for local history), road history(a peripheral obsession to local history), veteran/senior community programs(it's not really a hobby, but I enjoy it just as immensely as one).




* Sounds weird, I'm sure. What that amounts to is literally hopping in the car and heading out on old county roads to the far flung towns and burgs. I visit places where real main streets still exist(not the refurb/chain store hells everyone thinks are main streets!), businesses are still privately owned, nobody needs Hummers or dump-truck sized SUVs, the names you see haven't changed in a very long time(if at all) and your likely to hear "What's a Starbucks?" a little more often. Then I do something crazy, I get out, walk around, meet people, have conversations with them, learn about the local culture(and culture is the right word, as you would be surprised just how different things can be from one town to the next)and most importantly visit the local library(usually a goldmine for the area's heritage).

Much to my wife's chagrin, our storage room is stuffed to the gills with postcards, diner menus(remember when they actually had some aesthetic value? Well in some places they still do!), flyers, photos, trinkets, local artisan crafts, phonebooks, town anniversary yearbooks, old maps, old highway signs, old store signs and the like.

Swift
2006-Aug-31, 09:54 PM
Photography, model railroading, nature stuff.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Aug-31, 10:24 PM
Civil War re-enactment, urban archaeology, film scoring, backyard astronomy, front porch cultural history*(a sub-obsession of my obsession for local history), road history(a peripheral obsession to local history), veteran/senior community programs(it's not really a hobby, but I enjoy it just as immensely as one).




* Sounds weird, I'm sure. What that amounts to is literally hopping in the car and heading out on old county roads to the far flung towns and burgs. I visit places where real main streets still exist(not the refurb/chain store hells everyone thinks are main streets!), businesses are still privately owned, nobody needs Hummers or dump-truck sized SUVs, the names you see haven't changed in a very long time(if at all) and your likely to hear "What's a Starbucks?" a little more often. Then I do something crazy, I get out, walk around, meet people, have conversations with them, learn about the local culture(and culture is the right word, as you would be surprised just how different things can be from one town to the next)and most importantly visit the local library(usually a goldmine for the area's heritage).

Much to my wife's chagrin, our storage room is stuffed to the gills with postcards, diner menus(remember when they actually had some aesthetic value? Well in some places they still do!), flyers, photos, trinkets, local artisan crafts, phonebooks, town anniversary yearbooks, old maps, old highway signs, old store signs and the like.

As a geographer, road history is very appealing. Did you know there are places where the old wagon trails are still visible? Places where they crossed over ridges of hard ground still show wheel ruts to this day. Also, there are many places where highways and expressways follow the exact route of some of the big trails (Oregon Trail, Santa Fe Trail, etc). One of the main thoroughfares where I went to school (St. Cloud State U) follows where one of them used to be.

cjl
2006-Aug-31, 11:00 PM
Really cool rockets (http://www.rocketryforum.com/attachment.php?s=&postid=304077) (they're big too) (http://www.rocketryforum.com/attachment.php?s=&postid=304071) :D

Oh, and yeah, that one's mine. I'm the really nervous looking kid just to the left of the rocket (not the one with the frizzy hair).

Yes, they sometimes blow up (http://ockets.fotopic.net/p20274437.html), but that hasn't happened to me yet (knock on wood...).

Trebuchet
2006-Aug-31, 11:07 PM
Building catapults, of course.

Also lighthouses, photography, genealogy, naval history....

captain swoop
2006-Aug-31, 11:11 PM
I am out in the forset and up on the Moors about 3 or 4 times a week on the bike (I live right on the edge of the N.Yorks Moors so I am like 5 mins from the trails)

soylentgreen
2006-Aug-31, 11:24 PM
As a geographer, road history is very appealing. Did you know there are places where the old wagon trails are still visible? Places where they crossed over ridges of hard ground still show wheel ruts to this day. Also, there are many places where highways and expressways follow the exact route of some of the big trails (Oregon Trail, Santa Fe Trail, etc). One of the main thoroughfares where I went to school (St. Cloud State U) follows where one of them used to be.

I don't want to derail suntrack's thread so just real quick...

That's exactly the lure of it. Here we have(among others) the Old Mine Road, a 100-or-so mile dutch mining path from the 1600s wandering from the Delaware skylands to what used to be Esopus(now Kingston) on the Hudson. Some sources put it as being in use as early as the 1630's. There are portions near the mines where it sure looks it! ;)

Also, real quick, if you haven't seen these books, I recommend The American Highway: The History and Culture of Roads in the United States (http://www.amazon.com/American-Highway-History-Culture-United/dp/0786408227/sr=1-1/qid=1157064276/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-7400380-3451219?ie=UTF8&s=books). It's the alpha and omega of road history in this country. Detailed and thorough yet well-written and genuinely fun to read...and Greetings From The Lincoln Highway: America's First Coast-to Coast Road (http://www.amazon.com/Greetings-Lincoln-Highway-Americas-Coast-/dp/081170128X/sr=1-1/qid=1157065403/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-7400380-3451219?ie=UTF8&s=books). Another great book in the field. With plenty of information and a great sense of humor. Both books are relatively recent and in the publishing world that doesn't necessarily mean better, but these two are by authors with a genuine affection for the subject and they know and incorporate many of the classic sources. And definately keep an eye on those Arcadia 'Images Of America' books, they're starting to look at specific roadways lately. I got their NJ Turnpike book for Christmas. ( :o Dork!)

maybe if enough people in the forum are interested in this area, a small thread on the topic could be started...just a thought

...we now rejoin suntrack's thread, already in progress.

Moose
2006-Aug-31, 11:39 PM
RPGs. I love cRPGs, but I prefer pen&paper. Unfortunately, I'm in a lower population area. And that means there just aren't enough adult gamers around to get a group happening, let alone one that's interested in more than just dungeon crawling.

Otherwise, of the hobbys I can actually afford, I'm finding enjoyment out of hiking to see the local waterfalls. There's one about a half-click away from my house that I finally took the time to track down. Small, but some nice swimming spots on that small river. They're just a little tough to get to.

Tensor
2006-Aug-31, 11:44 PM
Live Theatre (I do set design and acting), astronomy and board wargamming (Inlcuding RPGs)

Maksutov
2006-Sep-01, 04:51 AM
I like to run the vehicle with a speed of maximum 60kmph, (as far as my vehicle running hobby is concern, infact this is not a hobby, it is a part of daily routine, but I am inserting the same work in the "hobby".You run a vehicle that goes 60,000 MPH? How about a tech description or at least a picture?

Hobbies for me include listening to and analyzing the music of Gustav Mahler, while chatting with other Mahlerites around the world. Also classical music in general (minus Tchaikovsky), rock before 1972, jazz, big bands, mountain climbing, running, sailing, biking, skiing, hifi/stereo, recording collecting, astronomy, building telescopes, photography, computers, geology, geography, genealogy, architecture, oenology, gardening, chiles, seafood, mineralogy, meteorology, mathematics, classic movies, books of almost any kind, sports (watching and participating, except for tennis and soccer), entomology, cosmology, cosmogony, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (a crossover from vocation to hobby and vice versa), woodworking, cabinetry, old New England gravestones, women, humor, metalworking, and a few other things.

Other than that, not much.

Gemini
2006-Sep-01, 05:27 AM
Model design/building(gallery: http://s81.photobucket.com/albums/j240/OV-104/), music, Sci-Fi, studying real space exploration, and Astronomy.

captain swoop
2006-Sep-01, 11:27 AM
I have been known to take part in the WW2 Weekends at the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

Its a mass Historical Reeneactment. Partly to extend the tourist season on the railway into October but now the whole town of Pickering and the villages along the rail line get involved. In Pickering it seems that half the population dress up in 1940s gear and the whole town seems to regress to WW2.

triplebird
2006-Sep-01, 01:01 PM
Suntrack2: "I like to run the vehicle with a speed of maximum 60kmph..."

You run a vehicle that goes 60,000 MPH? How about a tech description or at least a picture?

:D (?)

I think suntrack means 60 km/h (40 mph or so), not 60,000 mph!

Anyway, when I'm not posting on web forums ... I like reading, building/flying model rockets--no big stuff yet, still haven't outgrown the Estes kits :)-- hiking, camping, playing computer games, photography, aviation (not actually flying, unfortunately, mostly plane-spotting), astronomy, watching the Cosmos series of videos over and over...

jlhredshift
2006-Sep-01, 01:18 PM
I was a drag racer for thirty years. We travelled the eastern half of the US following the NHRA circuit and other races whenever possible. All that time my family and others would tell me that it was a hobby. In retrospect, I feel it was more a passion and I lived and breathed the sport foresaking all other endeavors. I do not regret that period of my life. While touring to some far flung drag strip, they tended not to be "in town", at night when all was said and done we would be camping in a field at the edge of a track and the panorama of the night sky would unfold upon us. Many of these nights the light pollution would be non-existent and the Milky Way would reveal itself to us while random shooting stars would cross the scene. Quite tranquill and beautiful. Now I collect books on science and mathematics, travel to local sites of geological interest, evidence of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) abound, and dabble in farming, steers, chickens, and agriculture. Our farm contains a sand dune created when ice shut off the St. Lawrence seaway and created Lake Whittlesey here in northern Ohio. At the time of the LGM our farm was under water or ice. I have not found any thing buried in the sand dune, yet, but there is always hope. So far it is clean, washed, yellow sand and I am fascinated by the thought that I am the first human to see this material, possibly, ever. :D

cjl
2006-Sep-01, 10:46 PM
Anyway, when I'm not posting on web forums ... I like reading, building/flying model rockets--no big stuff yet, still haven't outgrown the Estes kits :)--
The small stuff is still fun, and I fly it all the time in addition to the big stuff (though it doesn't give quite the rush that a big motor does - the one in the linked pic was a 1700Ns K550 [550N avg thrust]).

If you like the little stuff though, you may like Fliskits (www.fliskits.com). They have some great original kits as well (not to get too far off topic here).

Also, are you a member of a local club? That can make it a lot more fun :)

Glad I'm not the only one here who does rockets :)

Gerrsun
2006-Sep-02, 02:04 AM
Little bit of programming, little bit of archaeology, little bit of demiurge, little bit of crpgs....



As to local archaeology, its a good field. The SouthWest stuff in the US is considered 'sexy' so lots of folks dont go into urban or SE archaeology.

When i worked as an intern at the Dept of Natural Resources in Atlanta, we had to go visit a naval stores forest where they harvested turpentine. Looking for hurdy cups, look like terra cotta planter cups you see in gardening shoppes. We found lots of pine trees with 'cat whiskers' all over them where the tree bark hd been slashed to let them drip but no hurdy cups.

All sorts of stuff in the local that NEVER gets reported and its usually the locals who can guide you to it.

suntrack2
2006-Sep-02, 10:29 AM
Different personalities having different hobbies above, very nicely given the introduction of hobbies, thanks for that, no one has yet said that "study" is my hobby, I was waitaing for that answer, but you know whenever the topic comes on "hobby", people forgets study and reading and starts frankly speaches, that's quite awesome, in the above replies I have studied the habit of giving answers on "hobby" found quite interesting results, most of the above people given really what they do besides their work, but I am asking within a week or so, how much hours do you give on the "hobby" related requirements? how much time oftenly you enjoy by engaging yourself into hobbies? your hobbies creates any problem or menace to the others? or you don't bother others, and simply go on the "hobbies"?

This is I am casualy asking questions in the above paragraph. How many of you have a hobby like "collection of stamps", collection of descent stones", old things, any sculpute doing activites? In my opinion "keeping hobbies with oneself is a real creativity of brain to thinking specially on the different kind of segments of living in a state of intelligence, in such case brain acts like a seperate entity and forgets other things, even many people forget to take even food when they concentrate on their hobbies, the little childrens playing the computer games is also a part of their hobby, in which they normally forgets to do study.

sunil

cjl
2006-Sep-03, 06:01 AM
In the past week, I spent probably 8 hours on my hobby. Just today, I laminated a tube with carbon fiber for use in a rocket I am constructing.
As for problems? None really with mine - I tend to do it out in the middle of nowhere :)

suntrack2
2006-Sep-03, 06:12 AM
well, cjl, whether the domestic gas is useful in launching your rocket? Quiz for you? a dry battery can launch the rocket? at what speed your rocket can go in the deep sea and at which level? and in sky at which altitude?
I am asking you just for fun, don't take it seriously..:)
purely thermocol(thick) rocket can not balance the rest weight of the fuel? (another question for you)

sunil

cjl
2006-Sep-03, 06:26 AM
Domestic gas??

As for a dry cell - any battery that can supply ~3A at 12V or more can fire the electronic igniter.

I wouldn't know about the sea - never tried launching underwater, but my record in the air is 5120 feet agl, and a peak velocity of around 500 mph. The rocket that achieved this is the one in my avatar, the same one I posted pics of earlier.

Not sure what you mean by the last question though...

suntrack2
2006-Sep-03, 06:36 AM
I was asking you that if the interiors and the exteriors are made of a very light thing like thermocol bound, so will it give a light boost for your rocket, or this is not possible to make a thermocol rocket. (thermocol is a very light thing even lighter than of fibre). a dry battery can be fix into it easily to launch, but for rocket's nose specific weight is necessary ?

and if we placed a verticle cylender of domestic gas and charged with the battery energy to lift off the rocket?

sunil

Gemini
2006-Sep-03, 01:44 PM
In the past week, I spent probably 8 hours on my hobby. Just today, I laminated a tube with carbon fiber for use in a rocket I am constructing.
As for problems? None really with mine - I tend to do it out in the middle of nowhere :)

I tried to perform my second cluster ingnition Saturday, but for the life of me I couldn't find that gorram launch control box.

Edit:
I found the controller box. Both engines lit, albeit not at the same time. However the escape system for the capsule worked :D.
My Patriot missile flew much better, but succumbed to its arch nemesis, the tree.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Sep-03, 03:06 PM
Mega hours in the yard the past couple weeks. Harvesting, cooking, storing time of the year. Baking another sheet of apple crisp today. Cooked down 3 flats of tomatos the last couple days. Turned it into 2 gallons of the most scrumptious red sauce; everything but the sausage from the garden. 1st year of significant pear harvest. Oodles of goodies; we end up giving about half away, can only eat and store so much so fast. It's been a bountiful year.

1 afternoon/evening per week and one weekend per month skydiving.

Coming up soon, 2 evenings per week and 2 Saturdays per month coaching kids basketball; and downhill skiing on the other Saturdays once we get chilly enough.

cjl
2006-Sep-03, 03:11 PM
I was asking you that if the interiors and the exteriors are made of a very light thing like thermocol bound, so will it give a light boost for your rocket, or this is not possible to make a thermocol rocket. (thermocol is a very light thing even lighter than of fibre). a dry battery can be fix into it easily to launch, but for rocket's nose specific weight is necessary ?

and if we placed a verticle cylender of domestic gas and charged with the battery energy to lift off the rocket?

sunil

Mostly, they are either paper or reinforced paper (fiberglass or carbon fiber).

Still not sure what gas you mean by "domestic gas", but it should not perform vastly different from what it does in regular air in most gases.

captain swoop
2006-Sep-04, 12:10 PM
Did a 40 miler across the Moors on my new bike. Only got rained one once and got 2 punctures. So not a bad day!

suntrack2
2006-Sep-04, 01:09 PM
thanks swoop, many time punctures in the tyres create a problem, its not a problem, but the edge of stones, some pins which are rest on the road creates punctures in the tyres, and it become a problem for smooth journey, if the front tyre puncture and our vehicle is on a great speed, then it may create sometime great problem, we can't control the vehicle well in time, it may dash to the aside tree, or we just fall on the ground. and new bikes must to run slow all the time, otherwise a chock-up problem comes sometime, I have hear that, if a new brand motor bike we run @the speed of some 80-100 km per hr, and if that bike has not that capacity to move at this speed, in such cases engine problem may be occur.

and thanks also to farmerjumperdon, for preservation of tomato sauses round the year :) I like tomato sause with a slice of smooth bread.

sunil

Big Brother Dunk
2006-Sep-07, 03:56 AM
I'm an avid golfer, I golf 2-3 times a week during the summer.

Other than that, I enjoy a little back-yard astronomy, yoga, karate and I also make my own beer.

Ozzy
2006-Sep-07, 10:00 AM
I like Remote Sensing, Geo-archaeology, Aboriginal archaeology, Bush Walking, Marine archaeology, Playing Guitar, Singing, Lapidary, Local History, Songwriting, Palaeontology, Climatology, Science, Astronomy, and Writing Short Stories and Skits.

Soon I'm going to check out a cave that it a bit difficult to get to. A friend is an experienced rock climber and is going to lead the way. Rain permitting.

captain swoop
2006-Sep-07, 10:37 AM
thanks swoop, many time punctures in the tyres create a problem, its not a problem, but the edge of stones, some pins which are rest on the road creates punctures in the tyres, and it become a problem for smooth journey, if the front tyre puncture and our vehicle is on a great speed, then it may create sometime great problem, we can't control the vehicle well in time, it may dash to the aside tree, or we just fall on the ground. and new bikes must to run slow all the time, otherwise a chock-up problem comes sometime, I have hear that, if a new brand motor bike we run @the speed of some 80-100 km per hr, and if that bike has not that capacity to move at this speed, in such cases engine problem may be occur.

and thanks also to farmerjumperdon, for preservation of tomato sauses round the year :) I like tomato sause with a slice of smooth bread.

sunil

Mine isn't a motorbike its a pedal bike. A 'Specialized Stumpjumper' to be exact. Punctures are a hazard that its impossible to get rid of on the kind of ground I ride over.

triplebird
2006-Sep-08, 04:51 PM
well, cjl, whether the domestic gas is useful in launching your rocket?...sunil

Do you mean as in fuel gas (e.g. natural gas [methane] or LPG [propane])?

If so, no--model rockets are ignited electrically via a ground-based battery/igniter (i.e. the ignition system is not within the rocket--much too heavy) and powered by solid-fuel motors using either black powder or a "composite" propellant.

Most model rockets are made of paper, cardboard, balsa wood, light plastics, carbon fiber, or a combination of those.


Also, are you a member of a local club? That can make it a lot more fun...

No, not yet, only recently found out SLC has a model rocket club. I'm planning to go to one of their shoots and check it out. :)

teddyv
2006-Sep-08, 05:07 PM
Model railroading and railfanning, skiing in winter, hiking in the other seasons. Would like to do more 4x4'ing.

suntrack2
2006-Sep-08, 05:12 PM
thanks teddyv for the reply, you have said in the last line 4x4, is it about a rellay running race!

teddyv
2006-Sep-08, 05:23 PM
thanks teddyv for the reply, you have said in the last line 4x4, is it about a rellay running race!

Sorry, no. I mean going out on trails with my 4x4 truck. My province is full of backcountry logging roads that can take you out to the middle of nowhere. Almost unlimited exploring oppurtunities.

triplebird
2006-Sep-08, 06:28 PM
My province is full of backcountry logging roads that can take you out to the middle of nowhere. Almost unlimited exploring oppurtunities.

Then you'd love southern Utah--it's full of all kinds of 4x4 roads, mainly left over from the Uranium mining boom of the 40s. There're no logging roads as there ain't no logs. Unless you count sagebrush. :)