PDA

View Full Version : Subaru Finds the Most Distant Galaxy



Fraser
2006-Sep-16, 03:03 AM
The powerful Subaru telescope in Hawai'i has found the most distant galaxy ever seen, located 12.88 billion light-years away - this is only 780 million years after the Big Bang. Observing objects this distant is extremely difficult, not only because of the great distances involved, but because much of the Universe was obscured behind neutral hydrogen. Stars only then began clearing out this neutral hydrogen, making the Universe transparent.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/15/subaru-finds-the-most-distant-galaxy/)

Argos
2006-Sep-16, 12:39 PM
Off-beat info: Subaru means "unite" in Japanese, and it is the term the japanese use to refer to the Pleiades. :)

triplebird
2006-Sep-20, 06:53 PM
Off-beat info: Subaru...is the term the japanese use to refer to the Pleiades. :)

So that's where the symbol on Subaru cars comes from. :)

carbs_garbage
2006-Sep-21, 07:41 AM
hmm, i was under the impression that hubbles deep field images have galaxies that are OVER 13 billion light years away?

antoniseb
2006-Sep-21, 11:35 AM
hmm, i was under the impression that hubbles deep field images have galaxies that are OVER 13 billion light years away?
Hi carbs_garbage, welcome to the BAUT forum.

It is possible to reconcile these two statements.


The ACS uncovered galaxies that existed 800 million years after the big bang (at a redshift of 7). But the NICMOS may have spotted galaxies that lived just 400 million years after the birth of the cosmos (at a redshift of 12). Thompson must confirm the NICMOS discovery with follow-up research.

Clearly they aren't sure the precise distance to the galaxies in the HUDF. Following up on this is difficult. The Subaru observations have a more precise redshift assigned to the given galaxy. This galaxy is the most distant one observed so far in this spectral detail.

carbs_garbage
2006-Sep-21, 02:49 PM
ahh, i forgot the "ultra" too. ok thanks :p

Kootenaistar
2006-Sep-22, 05:58 AM
However one reads and digests this piece, I think it to be cool. I have an interest in several of the sciences, though no real training anywhere. Archaeology being one, seeing it now in the distant universe is a bit of a thrill. I've always touted astronomy as a tree with limbs involving all of the sciences somewhere, some how. Neat!