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View Full Version : The Location of the Oldest Recorded Supernova Discovered



Fraser
2006-Sep-19, 03:56 AM
Ancient Chinese astronomers recorded the occurence of a bright star in the sky in 185 AD; probably a supernova explosion. And now modern astronomers think they've found that explosion's corpse: supernova remnant RCW 86. New calculations have found that RCW 86 is about 2000 years old, making it the best candidate for this ancient supernova. This new data was gathered using the XMM-Newton and Chandra X-Ray observatories.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/18/the-location-of-the-oldest-recorded-supernova-discovered/)

meeboon1990
2006-Sep-21, 09:58 AM
How can the ancient people discover this supernova without having such modern technology like today? Anyways, I appreciate the information.

Blob
2006-Sep-21, 10:05 AM
@meeboon1990
Hum,
i suspect that a supernova in our galaxy would get quite bright;
So, perhaps they just used their eyes.

antoniseb
2006-Sep-21, 12:01 PM
How can the ancient people discover this supernova without having such modern technology like today? Anyways, I appreciate the information.
Hi meeboon, welcome to the BAUT forum.

As Blob has pointed out supernovae appear quite bright when they are in our galaxy. Classical era people observed the sky and the planets fairly regularly in many cultures, and this this supernova most likely appeared brighter than the planet Venus for a few weeks. Chinese observers bothered to mention it in their records. Odds are that Roman and Persian observers also noticed it, but we haven't found any record of it yet.

Kootenaistar
2006-Sep-25, 08:05 PM
It has been a boon to worldwide astronomy that the Chinese kept such detailed records of the sky events (along with all their other history) and are now allowing it out for all to know. Their records were kept and (cherished?/guarded?/valued?) for centuries. I thank them in so many ways.