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tofu
2006-Sep-20, 11:53 PM
I find this kind of amusing. When asked if the black holes that will be generated in a particle accelerator could devour the planet, this scientist responded:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14923900/from/RS.1/

that the probability that the entire planet and all life as we know it will be destroyed is really "totally miniscule."

So, just to clarify - it's not zero probability of destroying the earth, like if he had majored in accounting. No, it's a totally miniscule (but non-zero) change.

lol.

Lurker
2006-Sep-20, 11:57 PM
Should the title really be "It" won't kill you... or did you mean to use "I"...

Larry Jacks
2006-Sep-21, 12:20 AM
For that matter, it's a miniscule (but not zero) chance that you'll get creamed by an asteroid while sleeping tonight. There are countless bad things that COULD possibly happen. Fortunately, most of them are exceedingly rare. Meanwhile, roughly 800 Americans are killed in auto accidents each week (and according to a show I saw a few days ago, perhaps as many as 3,000 people are killed in auto accidents around the world each day). I don't hear too about many people giving up their cars given the very real (and not so miniscule) chance of getting killed or seriously injured.

Perspective.

01101001
2006-Sep-21, 12:31 AM
See topic is it wrong that this kinda frightens me? (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=46957)



Keywords for searchers: CERN Large Hadron Collider Brian Cox Big Bang Bangs Black Hole Holes factory Greg Landsberg

LucasVB
2006-Sep-21, 02:44 AM
MinUscule, you mean. :P Sorry, I had to take that off my head...

Tobin Dax
2006-Sep-21, 03:06 AM
Should the title really be "It" won't kill you... or did you mean to use "I"...
I'm hoping that both statements are true. :D

HenrikOlsen
2006-Sep-21, 04:49 PM
MinUscule, you mean. :P Sorry, I had to take that off my head...
That discussion's been had in another thread, even though one is preferred, both are correct.

pghnative
2006-Sep-21, 04:52 PM
For that matter, it's a miniscule (but not zero) chance that you'll get creamed by an asteroid while sleeping tonight. There are countless bad things that COULD possibly happen. Fortunately, most of them are exceedingly rare. Meanwhile, roughly 800 Americans are killed in auto accidents each week (and according to a show I saw a few days ago, perhaps as many as 3,000 people are killed in auto accidents around the world each day). I don't hear too about many people giving up their cars given the very real (and not so miniscule) chance of getting killed or seriously injured.

Well, that is because one precaution involves people making changes in their own lives. The other precaution involves someone else making changes to their lives.

IMO, there are few things people enjoy more than trying to control other people. For proof, visit your local homeowner's association meeting, if you are unfortunate enough to live in such an area.

Lurker
2006-Sep-21, 04:56 PM
Should the title really be "It" won't kill you... or did you mean to use "I"...
I'm hoping that both statements are true. :D
gosh... so am I... :eh:

I seem to be the target of threats around here a lot lately... :)

Donnie B.
2006-Sep-21, 06:17 PM
All I could think of when I saw the thread title was, "Good night, Westley. I'll probably kill you in the morning."

Doodler
2006-Sep-21, 07:21 PM
All I could think of when I saw the thread title was, "Good night, Westley. I'll probably kill you in the morning."

'...most likely...'

Unless you were thinking of Captain Picard...

Donnie B.
2006-Sep-21, 09:10 PM
Picky, picky! :D

Doodler
2006-Sep-21, 09:48 PM
Picky, picky! :D

I could almost quote that movie to you. :)

ASEI
2006-Sep-21, 10:47 PM
There's a miniscule (vanishingly, inexpressibly small) but nonzero probability that all observed laws of physics up until this date are really an extremely long coincidential pattern that will all break up tomorrow and dissolve into chaotic randomness. (After all, our experience of this order is empirical, and so our sample size may not be quite large enough. :-P ) But is it really useful to think of it as any probability at all, seeing as how we have absolutely no reason to expect it?

Doodler
2006-Sep-21, 10:52 PM
There's a miniscule (vanishingly, inexpressibly small) but nonzero probability that all observed laws of physics up until this date are really an extremely long coincidential pattern that will all break up tomorrow and dissolve into chaotic randomness. (After all, our experience of this order is empirical, and so our sample size may not be quite large enough. :-P ) But is it really useful to think of it as any probability at all, seeing as how we have absolutely no reason to expect it?

Somewhere's a lawyer crying his eyes out. You beat his record by ten words for the most verbose exposition basically meaning "no".

Lurker
2006-Sep-21, 10:53 PM
There's a miniscule (vanishingly, inexpressibly small) but nonzero probability that all observed laws of physics up until this date are really an extremely long coincidential pattern that will all break up tomorrow and dissolve into chaotic randomness. (After all, our experience of this order is empirical, and so our sample size may not be quite large enough. :-P ) But is it really useful to think of it as any probability at all, seeing as how we have absolutely no reason to expect it?
You need to come to StevenCrum's threads in the ATM forum... :p