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ToSeek
2003-May-01, 05:11 PM
India is planning an unmanned lunar polar orbiter (http://www.spacedaily.com/2003/030429012615.mjvka2bc.html)

Glom
2003-May-01, 05:29 PM
Yeah it appears that India and China are the future of manned spaceflight.

snowcelt
2003-May-01, 07:23 PM
Before I read the article I bet myself that an argument would be made that the money spent on the space craft would be better spent on improvements at home. I won. It always amazes me that so many people think that the only important endeavors worth man's time and effort are the acquisition of food, clothing, and shelter.

tracer
2003-May-02, 01:14 AM
Well ... with India, I can kinda understand. I mean, that place is horribly overcrowded, and stuff. If something isn't done to improve the standard of living of the average Indian, there won't be enough TV sets for all of them to watch the live pictures from the moon probe! ;)

snowcelt
2003-May-02, 09:39 AM
tracer: I think that when you state that "[i]f something isn't done to improve the standard of living of the average Indian...", misses my point. I think that a scientific work like the moon probe is what is needed to improve the living conditions in India (Or any other developing nation.) A nation needs to be inspired to go beyond the subsistive. Quests like this are the things that ensure children to go beyond basic food, clothing, and shelter considerations. I bet if it was not for Kennedy's moon speach there would be a lot less science in the U.S. However, this is just my opinion. I just think this is the kind of road that places like India have to travel if they wish to join the developed world.

planethollywood
2003-May-02, 02:04 PM
with india's caste system society, i don't see the plight of the desperatly poor improving. but i do see the upper caste getting a few more mercs because of it.

Glom
2003-May-02, 05:22 PM
I thought the ancient caste system of India was abolished ages ago.

ToSeek
2003-May-02, 05:37 PM
I thought the ancient caste system of India was abolished ages ago.

Officially, yes; unofficially, no. (http://www.cnn.com/2001/WORLD/asiapcf/south/02/07/india.quake.02/)

Grand Vizier
2003-May-02, 05:45 PM
Well ... with India, I can kinda understand. I mean, that place is horribly overcrowded, and stuff. If something isn't done to improve the standard of living of the average Indian, there won't be enough TV sets for all of them to watch the live pictures from the moon probe! ;)

But bear in mind that they have a fledgling space industry, and one that is very cost-effective if you look at its budget. They rigged their PSLV - which was only intended to put LEO payloads in polar orbit - to put more than a tonne in GEO. Worked first time. (Admittedly, there is a problem, in that the international launch market is now very depressed, but that won't always be so). It would be foolish for a country of nearly 1 billion people to be totally dependent on foreign space industry, in my opinion. They have to look to the future.

With regard to the moon probe, quite apart from the science, this will be a spectacular piece of PR for India's high-tech sector. I don't blame them at all.

Oh, incidentally, the standard of living of the average Indian is rising - it's just starting from a very low base. And WRT to TVs - it's less individualistic there. (And India has been a pioneer in direct satellite TV broadcasting to remote spots). Maybe, there's only one, or a few, TVs in any given village, but people will gang together to watch. Fifty years ago, we were doing the same in the UK.

ToSeek
2004-Aug-12, 04:06 PM
ISRO for consensus on putting man on moon (http://www.sunnetwork.org/news/science/science.asp?id=5528)


ndia's space research agency here Thursday said it wanted a national consensus before launching a mission to put a man on the moon.

"The question whether India should go for a manned mission is being debated," G. Madhavan Nair, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman said.

"A similar debate was held before we embarked on the proposed unmanned lunar mission (Chandrayaan-1) to conduct scientific experiments on the moon's orbit."

Candy
2004-Aug-15, 04:06 AM
Great, now we are outsourcing outerspace. JK. 8-[

eburacum45
2004-Aug-15, 09:24 AM
"A similar debate was held before we embarked on the proposed unmanned lunar mission (Chandrayaan-1) to conduct scientific experiments on the moon's orbit."

Are they going to perform experiments on the Moon's orbit? I hope they don't move it within the Roche limit...

John Kierein
2004-Aug-15, 01:35 PM
Great, now we are outsourcing outerspace. JK. 8-[

http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/archive/index.html

Look at 8/15

Candy
2004-Aug-15, 04:39 PM
Great, now we are outsourcing outerspace. JK. 8-[

http://www.unitedmedia.com/comics/dilbert/archive/index.html

Look at 8/15 You know Scott gets most of his creative ideas from the BABB? :wink:

ToSeek
2004-Aug-16, 04:02 PM
India To Launch Recoverable Spacecraft In 2005 (http://www.spacedaily.com/news/india-04l.html)


India will join an elite club of countries with the launch next year of its first recoverable and reusable spacecraft in polar orbit, the Indo-Asian News Service (IANS) reported last Friday (August 13).

ToSeek
2004-Sep-28, 05:03 PM
ndia's unmanned moon mission going smoothly: official (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2004-09/26/content_2025654.htm)


India's unmanned moon mission -Chandrayan - is expected to take place in 2007-08 as it is progressing smoothly, the country's space agency chief G. MadhavanNair said here Sunday.

"There has been a lot of debate in the scientific community whether we should do this because of the huge cost, but what I would like to say is that the total cost of the project is just Rs.3.8 billion (83 million US dollars)," Nair, chairman of the IndianSpace Research Organization (ISRO), told reporters.

ToSeek
2005-Jan-05, 06:19 PM
US considering participation in Indian moon mission: (http://www.newkerala.com/news-daily/news/features.php?action=fullnews&id=55562)


The US is considering to participate in India's moon mission and collaborating in the telemedicine sector.

"India is working on a mission to moon. We are looking at collaborations with India in this," Dr Lee Morin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Science at the US Department of State, Bureau of Oceans and International Environment and Scientific Affairs and a NASA astronaut, told reporters here at the 92nd session of the Indian Science Congress.

"US is also looking at collaboration in the area of telemedicine," he said.

um3k
2005-Jan-05, 07:55 PM
Sounds good to me.

ToSeek
2005-Jan-26, 06:20 PM
India To Launch Two Lunar Missions By 2015: Official (http://www.spacedaily.com/news/lunar-05c.html)


f India's first lunar mission scheduled for 2007 is successful, it will launch another one by 2015, the head of the country's space programme said Tuesday.

"ISRO will undertake more lunar missions if the first one turns out to be successful. In fact, we propose to launch two lunar missions before 2015," P. Madhavan Nair, chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation said.

He said preparations were on track for the first mission called Chandrayan-I or Moon Vehicle I.

ToSeek
2005-Feb-03, 06:06 PM
NASA Selects Moon Mapper for Mission of Opportunity (http://www.physorg.com/news2915.html)



NASA chose the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) to fly as part of the scientific payload for the Indian Space Research Organization's (ISRO) Chandraayan-1 mission, slated for launch in 2007. The M3 is designed to create a mineral-resource map of the moon. It will be flown as part of the Chandraayan-1 mission if it is selected by ISRO in an independent competition.

Doodler
2005-Feb-03, 06:18 PM
Anyone else seeing the stark irony in the US seeking collaberation with India's space program while they snubbed the Chinese program as 'not sufficiently mature'?

skrap1r0n
2005-Feb-03, 06:20 PM
I think it's fantastic. Exploration like this really should be a global effort. Too bad we can't tell the Gov't to cut out all the posturing and Beurocratic ** and just DO IT!

Kullat Nunu
2005-Feb-03, 06:52 PM
... (Chandrayaan-1) ...


... -Chandrayan - ...


... Chandrayan-I ...


... Chandraayan-1...

Correct answer is ... Chandrayaan - 1 (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan-1/announcement.htm)! #-o

Well, Indian names are not that difficult, like Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (http://chandra.harvard.edu/about/chandra.html). Easy to memorize.

synthomus
2005-Feb-03, 07:45 PM
Anyone else seeing the stark irony in the US seeking collaberation with India's space program while they snubbed the Chinese program as 'not sufficiently mature'?

Doodler, that was a true definition of irony again.

Imho, the indian space tiger will end up as a bedside carpet.

Doodler
2005-Feb-03, 08:20 PM
Anyone else seeing the stark irony in the US seeking collaberation with India's space program while they snubbed the Chinese program as 'not sufficiently mature'?

Doodler, that was a true definition of irony again.

Imho, the indian space tiger will end up as a bedside carpet.

I dunno, a functioning space program coming out of a country that just a couple decades ago was considered Third World is something I'd hesitate to brush off so easily. I mean, culturally speaking, India has made the most amazing leap forward of any nation on the planet, including some of the newly integrated Eastern European states.

In the grand scheme, India might putter along in comparison to the Europeans, Russians, Americans and Chinese, but that doesn't take one iota away from the significance of even making it this far. They paid their dues and they've got a nascent satellite launch industry flying, and the ongoing jokes about "outsourcing to India" will one day come boomeranging back on us. The grunt work of high tech we slough off onto their shoulders will repay incredible dividends in a generation or so.

Pardon my playing on one of those jokes, but in ten years, the guy speaks English as a third or fourth language telling you "Please to be putting you on hold" will probably to so because he's brushing you off because he's got better things to do. [You meaning, the general population who's cracking said off color jokes these days]

synthomus
2005-Feb-03, 09:14 PM
I dunno, a functioning space program coming out of a country that just a couple decades ago was considered Third World is something I'd hesitate to brush off so easily.

Well, that's the nature of irony, I saw the irony in your remark, but the other way round than you meant it. That's ironic in itself, isn't it? :)

Don't get me wrong, I'm not per se skeptical of progressive developments in countries like India. You're right, there certainly is a lot of potential for space science in these countries. It's not that they're lacking smart people at the basic level. What makes me talk ironically about their efforts is their anachronistic leadership, I mean both in India as well as in China. All that futile "our great nation will walk on the moon" bragging! Why can't they play it cool like ESA does more or less well by simply pursuing some profound space science? If they decided to do so, I would stop making jokes of them immediately.

As we discussed yesterday (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?p=409612&highlight=#409612), you're a manned spaceflight proponent, while I'm not (not for the next 25 years at least). So obviously our assessments of India's and China's space plans differ quite a bit.

Doodler
2005-Feb-03, 09:37 PM
Imho, the indian space tiger will end up as a bedside carpet.

This was what I was responding to, I knew you read me right, I just thought this came across as a more straightforward criticism of their effort. If I read wrong, my apologies.

As for manned or unmanned, in this particular instance, anything they fly is gold to me (so long as its not nuclear tipped). When India first proposed lunar missions, there was some flap about them doing things that other nations had already done. That kinda peeved me because following those footsteps accomplishes a couple beneficial things.

1) Gives them practice with known techniques and technology.
2) Gives them a baseline to compare the performance of their own work.
3) Double checks any work that other space agencies have done to make sure it was done right the first time. (Nothing wrong with a second opinion)

Learning the ropes is hard enough, even worse when you have to make up your training regimen from scratch for each new student.

JonClarke
2005-Feb-03, 09:41 PM
It puzzles me that people ignore that achievements and potential of the world's fourth largest national economy. In 10 years India will be the worlds third largest. It is also the world's largest demoncracy, which people often forget. In terms of launch capacity they are well alead of where the USSR ar the US were in 1961. If India sets a goal of a lunar probe there is no reason why they cannot achieve it, providing it is adaquately resourced.

Jon

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Feb-03, 10:01 PM
It puzzles me that people ignore that achievements and potential of the world's fourth largest national economy. In 10 years India will be the worlds third largest. It is also the world's largest demoncracy, which people often forget. In terms of launch capacity they are well alead of where the USSR ar the US were in 1961. If India sets a goal of a lunar probe there is no reason why they cannot achieve it, providing it is adaquately resourced.

Jon

Yes, good for them like many nations India has its problems but I'm glad for them that they will be going ahead on this space quest. I like their rcokets I reckon they were called PSLV and Gslv and used the liquid Hydrogen and Oxygen methods, the more folks that can provide access to space the better however this could push some competition with Pakistan, who won't like to be beaten by a rival. Even if NASA turn's away from Chinese I think its going to be ok, becuase the Chinese industry and economy is growing rapidly amd Europeans have been doing joint efforts with the Chinese and China's relationship wit Russia is also growing. This news is very good for India and the Indians going to space will perhaps be of great help to the global scientific community.

Maddad
2005-Feb-04, 07:18 AM
It puzzles me that people ignore that achievements and potential of the world's fourth largest national economy. In 10 years India will be the worlds third largest. It is also the world's largest demoncracy, which people often forget. In terms of launch capacity they are well alead of where the USSR ar the US were in 1961. If India sets a goal of a lunar probe there is no reason why they cannot achieve it, providing it is adaquately resourced.
JonHello Jon. Good to see you here. I'm not over there anymore.

A friend I went to college with in the mid-90's comes from Bangalore, which caused me to read up and discover that India already had a robust space program back then.

One other thing I'd like to add is that India has about four times the population that the USA does, which in itself is a resource. A significant portion of that population is becoming technologically involved. For instance, we're outsourcing bank dataprocessing there because their normal working hours are our nighttime hours. Banks send data to Bangalor for batch processing. It returns in time for the opening of business back here the next day. From an intellectual standpoint, India is ready for this challenge.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Aug-18, 09:20 AM
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM88T808BE_Germany_1.html

a pic of it

http://www.esa.int/images/lunarcraft-400.jpg

publiusr
2005-Aug-19, 08:15 PM
They are working on a GSLV upgrade with a huge solid first stage that masses out to 200 metric tonnes. With the hypergolic strap-ons--it will surpass Delta II--and approach the R-7 /Ariane 4 capabilities.


GSLV is superior to the stock Titan II (defunct) already.

They could launch Gemini craft right now if they so chose.

Argos
2005-Aug-20, 01:16 PM
I´ll believe India is a democracy when I see an Untouchable in the crew...

publiusr
2005-Aug-24, 05:00 PM
Could be worse--they could be launched one way to the moon.

badprof
2005-Aug-24, 05:06 PM
Hi all,

Just one comment on this, the space program of countries like China and India should not be discounted. They are gaining a huge population of scientists and engineers, mostly trained in western countries like the USA. As we were told today at our faculty meeting, by 2010 about 90% of engineers with live in Asia. That has to be a great resource for a space program.

Cheers

Infinity
2005-Aug-29, 04:32 AM
At least SOMEBODY is taking space travel seriously!

=D>

publiusr
2005-Sep-07, 05:09 PM
We are getting left behind--and fast. The hurricane rebuild will eat all funding up--that and the war.

Launch window
2006-Mar-13, 07:26 AM
I like their Lunar mission - Chandrayaan-I
http://www.spacedaily.com/news/lunar-05zs.html
http://www.spacedaily.com/news/lunar-05q.html
it looks good


I just hope people like hoagland & nancy aren't running Indian space policy

???


India and China are planning to actively explore moon in the next twenty years. Americans and Russians did the same in sixties and seventies. Then all on a sudden, after Apollo 13 disaster, neither country approached moon ever. Some rumors float in the world that American really never went to moon. Fact is they did. It was not easy. NASA eventually found that risk of manned lunar mission with existing technologies is just too high for many technical reasons. But was that all?
http://www.indiadaily.com/editorial/7379.asp
According to some think tanks, American and Russians were told by the extraterrestrial civilizations that own the lunar real estate that they better not venture there.

????

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Mar-13, 09:48 AM
India Daily is a woowoo rag.
Be warned. :shifty:

Mephisto
2006-Mar-13, 10:37 AM
Before I read the article I bet myself that an argument would be made that the money spent on the space craft would be better spent on improvements at home. I won. It always amazes me that so many people think that the only important endeavors worth man's time and effort are the acquisition of food, clothing, and shelter.

Well, they'd be right if the dichotomy was between SPACE FLIGHT ONLY or FOOD, CLOTHING AND SHELTER ONLY. But clearly, it isn't.

It's like when people say "oh, I wish they'd stop spending $20m on changing stamps when that money could go to African kids!' In reality, that $20m would do nothing. In reality, all the money's actually being spent on the armed forces and wars and that $20m makes no difference either way.

We don't have to choose between spaceflight and everything else. We just have to not choose everything else to the degree to which it's impossible to fund spaceflight, and vice-versa.

suntrack2
2006-Mar-13, 11:59 AM
tracer, is quite correct in difining the standard of living and about tv sets, he is correct in defining the terminology about the population (over population), this (population) creates lot of problems as far as living standards are concern, but as far as brains are concerns they are ample though. you have to just overcome that problem of "mass population" and we have to look positively towards such ivents which are going to follow on moon, moon is the wealth of all people of world hence we have to look into it as optimist like.

Tracer's doubt is almost correct and I am agree with him, that number of people don't have a tv sets, but they have great radios with them, atleast they can hear the news like bbc, voice of america etc, hence to listen the news on tv and radio is almost the same standard, but tv shows radio can't.

sunil ( nasa did a great achievement in the field of astronomy and space related, and country like India can also to do the same like activities to support the global activities in the field of astronomy and space related programms, this is not a F1 racing to go in the space. )

:)

Dave Mitsky
2006-Mar-13, 12:01 PM
I'm moving this to the Space Exploration section.

Dave Mitsky

Launch window
2006-Mar-21, 04:51 PM
Great, now we are outsourcing outerspace. JK. 8-[

President Bush defended American corporations that "outsource" jobs overseas in pursuit of cheap labor.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-030306bush_lat,0,3726631.story?coll=la-home-headlines
Bush spoke on the final day of a state visit to India in which he declared that the two nations, estranged for much of the 20th century, are now "closer than ever before."


http://asia.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=19182
The Chandrayaan-1 mission will be a major advance for U.S./Indian civil space cooperation, as well as for the scientific activities critical to President Bush's Vision for Space Exploration.

novaderrik
2006-Mar-21, 09:09 PM
why shouldn't the US be proud of India's advances in their space program- after all, most of the engineers and scientists that are working on it are products of American universities.

jkmccrann
2006-Mar-22, 02:56 AM
with india's caste system society, i don't see the plight of the desperatly poor improving. but i do see the upper caste getting a few more mercs because of it.

In all fairness, I think the emergence of the Indian economy is something that's going to be of great benefit to all in India. Sure, its an enormous country with over a billion residents - many of whom live in poverty, but as opportunities open up for more and more people then the standards of living of all will gradually be lifted.

Its precisely because of the modernising of the Indian economy that its even possible to speculate about the possibility of India going to the Moon, something that even 15 years ago would have been dismissed completely out of hand!

jkmccrann
2006-Mar-22, 03:19 AM
Anyone else seeing the stark irony in the US seeking collaberation with India's space program while they snubbed the Chinese program as 'not sufficiently mature'?

I have to agree with this point - I think it comes back to realpolitik and the simple fact that India is, for whatever reason, viewed more benevolently - I would suggest one only needs look across the straight from Fujian to find the answer as to why it is that India is viewed in a favourable light - and will continue to be for some time yet.

One only need look at some of the deals being entered into in more recent times to find more weight being added to the point you make.



We are getting left behind--and fast. The hurricane rebuild will eat all funding up--that and the war.


Don't know about hurricane funding eating up NASA, but the war - maybe, and particularly any future conflicts - and the national debt. Borrowing continues and at ever increasingly mandated rates.

Personally, I have to see the ascent of India, and for that matter China, as positive forces in terms of the Exploration of Space. Nothing like a bit of competition to get the juices flowing.

ToSeek
2006-Mar-22, 03:22 PM
Two "India to the Moon" threads merged.

mpai
2006-Mar-24, 07:33 PM
I´ll believe India is a democracy when I see an Untouchable in the crew...

Maybe it might interest you that India had an "Untouchable" a President and a Prime Minister until recently. Currently India has both the President and the Prime Minister from the minority category. Besides the country has two of the most qualified Government Heads.

Now how many other democratic countries have something similar ?

I would like to inform you that ISRO has made use of its space age technology to help the society as well. Take for example the same light weight alloys, used in making satelliet launching rockets, are now being used to make Amputees and artificial limbs for our disabled friends. The UGC Programs have brought high tech educations to far flung students in remote areas free. The list is endless.

Manoj

publiusr
2006-Mar-24, 09:18 PM
Good point. It gives them hope for the future.

Launch window
2006-Apr-12, 11:21 AM
India to launch US satellites, use US technology
http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles/2006/03/14/Navigation/177/205443/India+to+launch+US+satellites,+use+US+technology.h tml
Indian launchers will be able to carry US satellites, while Indian satellites will have access to US components under a deal signed by President Bush during a state visit to India on 1-3 March.

Bush finalised the agreement with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh after a year of preparation by the two countries.

The deal was drawn up by a joint working group formed in June to look at expanding civil space co-operation. The group is led by Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) satellite centre director P S Goel and US State Department principal deputy assistant secretary Anthony Rock.

“An agreement has been reach*ed that will permit US satellites and satellites containing US components to be launched by Indian space launch vehicles,” says the US-Indian joint statement. ISRO has been expecting NASA to provide instrumentation for its Chandrayaan-1 Moon probe, set for launch in early 2008.



Description
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/database/MasterCatalog?sc=CHANDRYN1
Chandrayaan-1 is an Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) mission designed to orbit the Moon over a two year period with the objectives of upgrading and testing India's technological capabilities in space and returning scientific information on the lunar surface. The spacecraft bus is roughly a 1.5 meter cube with a dry weight of 523 kg. It is based on the Kalpansat meteorological satellite. It will also carry a 30 kg probe designed to be released from the spacecraft and penetrate the lunar surface. Power is provided by a solar array which generates 750 W and charges lithium ion batteries. A bipropellant propulsion system is used to transfer Chandrayaan-1 into lunar orbit and maintain attitude. The spacecraft is 3-axis stabilized using attitude control thrusters and reaction wheels. Knowledge is provided by star sensors, accelerometers, and an inertial reference unit. Telecommand communications will be in S-band and science data transmission in X-band.

ClarksonN
2006-Jul-07, 02:12 AM
Thought Chandrayaan (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan-1/) needs a bit of an update.

Latest progress - 2007 launch - sattelite production underway - new pad recently installed:

http://www.hindu.com/2006/07/02/stories/2006070200081300.htm

And if you are interested in an indian duscussion on space that I ran across on a public forum, check here:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=209449&page=10&pp=20


I´ll believe India is a democracy when I see an Untouchable in the crew...

You shouldnt comment on stuff if you dont fully understand it. There has been an 'untouchable' president of India if im not mistaken, so much for that, when my country has never had an ethnic PM and America has never even had a female PM.


with india's caste system society, i don't see the plight of the desperatly poor improving. but i do see the upper caste getting a few more mercs because of it.

As if your country and mine dont have 'class' systems anyway. Give it time, money and legislation.


why shouldn't the US be proud of India's advances in their space program- after all, most of the engineers and scientists that are working on it are products of American universities.

They have one of the best higher education standings, with institutes like the IITs being regarded as high as MIT.


Well ... with India, I can kinda understand. I mean, that place is horribly overcrowded, and stuff. If something isn't done to improve the standard of living of the average Indian, there won't be enough TV sets for all of them to watch the live pictures from the moon probe! ;)

So should the funds from Apollo have gone to the street urchins of the USA? :p Globalisation will do the trick - and it isnt like India wasnt rich in the poast before imperialism anyway (largest economy of the ancient world due to liberal trade).


Anyone else seeing the stark irony in the US seeking collaberation with India's space program while they snubbed the Chinese program as 'not sufficiently mature'?

The ISRO is more advanced in some areas - India has the biggest communication sattelite cluster, etc.

Launch window
2006-Nov-06, 06:52 AM
India Mulls First Manned Space Mission
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/India_Mulls_First_Manned_Space_Mission_999.html

India yesterday held out the possibility of sending astronauts to the moon by 2020 and called for a national debate on whether it should enter a space race with richer nations. The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) says it could have a manned spaceship ready in eight years to orbit the Earth and put Indian astronauts on the lunar surface in 14 years.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/india/story/0,,1938508,00.html

Strap-On Engine Caused GSLV Failure
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Strap_On_Engine_Caused_GSLV_Failure_999.html

antoniseb
2006-Nov-06, 01:48 PM
India yesterday held out the possibility of sending astronauts to the moon by 2020...

The US did it in about 12 years, with a similar sized GNP to what India has now, and less world-wide understanding of the technology and science involved. I would think that if the Indian people decided to do it, they could make it happen. I also think that they will look at the cost and postpone the effort.

Doodler
2006-Nov-06, 04:38 PM
I´ll believe India is a democracy when I see an Untouchable in the crew...

Even US democracy spent a good long while coping with bigotry issues. That is something that can be overcome. Patience and pressure. Not the most efficient methods, but they do work given time.

3rdvogon
2006-Nov-08, 12:29 PM
Well I say good for the Indians.

My own country actually had ambitions of its own about putting things up into space in the late 50s but like so many things we followed the "Food Shelter Medicine" argument made earlier. As a consequence we have gradually moved away from any larger scientific/engineering goals and settled into an obsession with funding Schools and Hospitals (and not even doing an especially good job at that either) the net effect of this gradual movement has been a slow but continuous process of turning our collective backs towards science since the end of the 1960s. Having become totally cynical about religion, cynical about politics and now cynical about progress, about all we have left is our sense of humour.

So it is nice to see humans somewhere still having some sense of vision of the future.

ClarksonN
2006-Dec-06, 12:14 AM
Heh, you British too then? :)

It isnt too late to embark on our own space program - we have one of the strongest economies in Europe.

3rdvogon
2006-Dec-06, 12:25 AM
Heh, you British too then? :)

It isnt too late to embark on our own space program - we have one of the strongest economies in Europe.

Yes but not the motivation and certainly the UK voters would not tolerate it if it meant cutting funding on schools and hospitals.

Remember all the fuss over the cost of the millenium dome - and how even now people are complaining about what the 2012 Olympics will cost.

Launch window
2006-Dec-11, 01:46 PM
India’s Mars odyssey
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/5922_1853057,0015002100000000.htm

Stringent Quality Check For GSLV Part
http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Stringent_Quality_Check_For_GSLV_Parts_999.html
The primary cause of mission failure was attributed to the loss of thrust in one liquid strap-on motor due to malfunctioning of propellent regulator.

Ezelite
2006-Dec-12, 01:57 PM
I live in the U.K. For decades now Indians have been the backbone of our local communities and health service. At the heart of nearly every village is an Indian owned general store, and all of the doctors at my local health centre are of Indian origin. In India today, a callcentre worker usually has to study at university level to compete in this industry, and the average callcentre wage is approx 1000-1200 dollars per month. In cultural terms, and based on my own experience, Indians are among the most driven and resourceful members of the human race. I would not be suprised if, 100 years from now, India was at the heart of the human effort to colonise the near solar system. Good for them!

publiusr
2006-Dec-22, 07:18 PM
Well said!

ClarksonN
2007-Jan-05, 11:54 PM
Very true - although I think all nations inevitably get less driven once they are rich in GNP per capita terms.

I really want to see an Indian in space.


Yes but not the motivation and certainly the UK voters would not tolerate it if it meant cutting funding on schools and hospitals.

Remember all the fuss over the cost of the millenium dome - and how even now people are complaining about what the 2012 Olympics will cost.

I guess in some ways its good people are fiscally tight...

Maybe it should be left to our private sector...






A new update that might be of interest.

Here is the final configuration for Chandrayaan-I:

http://isro.org/Chandrayaan/images/space3d01ab.jpg

Here is what those payload abbreviations stand for: http://isro.org/Chandrayaan/htmls/psexperiments.htm






Lunar rover (!)

...and here is the configuration of the lunar rover that they will land with Chandrayaan-II in 2010: :)

http://www.hindu.com/2007/01/04/images/2007010401342201.jpg

http://www.hindu.com/2007/01/04/stories/2007010401342200.htm


The rover will be designed to move on wheels on the lunar surface, pick up samples of soil or rocks, do in situ chemical analysis and send the data to the mother-spacecraft Chandrayaan-II, which will be orbiting above. Chandrayaan-II will transmit the data to the ground.






Sattelite re-entry experiment:

And also, news on India's sattelite recovery experiment, which is designed as a testbed for a future human re-entry vehicle, as part of the possible crewed spaceflight program:

http://img120.imageshack.us/img120/3416/pslvc7rp9.jpg




Read more about the ISRO in this guide I made:

http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=40045&highlight=isro

Or on wiki of course...

ClarksonN
2007-Jan-06, 12:05 AM
http://isro.org/Chandrayaan/images/space3d01ab.jpg

Just to list them fully:

Indian instruments:

TMC:
Terrain Mapping stereo Camera (TMC) in the panchromatic band, having 5 m spatial resolution and 20 km swath

HySI:
Hyper Spectral Imaging camera (HYSI) operating in 400-950nm band with a spectral resolution of 15nm and spatial resolution of 80m with a swath of 20km.

LLRI:
Lunar Laser Ranging Instrument (LLRI) with height resolution of about 10m

HEX:
High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX) using Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detector in the 20-250 keV energy region with spatial resolution of 40km

MIP:
Moon Impact Probe (MIP) as piggyback on the main orbiter of the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft which will impact on the surface of the moon

Payoad space offered to other countries:

C1XS:
Chandrayaan-1 Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) through ESA -a collaboration between Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK and ISRO Satellite Centre, ISRO. Part of this payload is redesigned by ISRO to suit Chandrayaan-1 scientific objectives.

SIR-2:
Near Infra Red spectrometer (SIR-2) from Max Plank Institute, Lindau, Germany through ESA

SARA:
Sub KeV Atom Reflecting Analyser (SARA) through ESA, from Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Sweden and Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, ISRO. The Data Processing Unit of this payload/ experiment is designed and developed by ISRO, while Swedish Institute of Space Physics develops the payload.

RADOM:
Radiation Dose Monitor Experiment (RADOM) from Bulgarian Academy of Sciences

Mini-SAR:
Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar (MiniSAR) from Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University and Naval Air Warfare Centre, USA through NASA

M-CUBE:
Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M-CUBE) from Brown University and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA through NASA

Sleepy_Sentry
2007-Jan-06, 04:04 AM
I don't know how worthwhile India's space program would be unless they could dedicate huge sums of money to it and really get something out of it.

It's true that there are needs back home, but I think in the U.S. at least, no one can complain that the money put towards NASA is wasted and should be put towards other things when:

The U.S. has spent $355,998,000,346 and counting (http://nationalpriorities.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=182) on the war in Iraq and NASA's 2005 budget was only a paltry $13,711,000,000 (http://www.answers.com/topic/nasa-budget)! Also, the government has so far budgeted 62 billion (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2005/09/27/BUGADEUAO01.DTL) for Katrina relief.

So clearly, the money put towards the U.S.'s space program (I'm using it an example) wouldn't make much of a difference towards other government efforts. Not to mention the U.S. government (I'm American by the way) finds much worse ways to spend their money, such as on Iraq. In addition, people also fail to realize the number of jobs created by the space program, positive message it creates about America (there are few of those these days), and the fact that it's just plain cool.

ClarksonN
2007-Jan-06, 12:22 PM
I guess you can still do worthwhile stuff with little money - i.e. maybe India could design a cheap service or crew return module for the ISS, and become a player.

Doodler
2007-Jan-07, 04:55 AM
I don't know how worthwhile India's space program would be unless they could dedicate huge sums of money to it and really get something out of it.

It's true that there are needs back home, but I think in the U.S. at least, no one can complain that the money put towards NASA is wasted and should be put towards other things when:

The U.S. has spent $355,998,000,346 and counting (http://nationalpriorities.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=182) on the war in Iraq and NASA's 2005 budget was only a paltry $13,711,000,000 (http://www.answers.com/topic/nasa-budget)! Also, the government has so far budgeted 62 billion (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2005/09/27/BUGADEUAO01.DTL) for Katrina relief.

So clearly, the money put towards the U.S.'s space program (I'm using it an example) wouldn't make much of a difference towards other government efforts. Not to mention the U.S. government (I'm American by the way) finds much worse ways to spend their money, such as on Iraq. In addition, people also fail to realize the number of jobs created by the space program, positive message it creates about America (there are few of those these days), and the fact that it's just plain cool.

The US economy is also grossly inflated. From 2005 to 2006, the dollar lost about 18% of its buying power.

Depending on local economic conditions, a little can go a LOT farther.

Launch window
2007-Feb-14, 12:34 PM
Moon Lander Mission ?

http://www.bernama.com.my/bernama/v3/news.php?id=245280

01101001
2008-Feb-25, 09:03 PM
AFP: India to announce lunar mission date this month (http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5iUzaedN2uW3YoBKKPFaY724JX9Xg) (old news, from Feb 12, 2008)


India will announce the date of its first lunar mission by the end of this month, the head of the country's space agency said Wednesday.

A report in the Times of India Wednesday said that the launch of Chandrayaan-1, originally planned for April, had been "tentatively postponed" until June or July because of technical reasons.

But Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) chairman G. Madhavan Nair said in response that the date of the unmanned mission had yet to be decided.

The Hindu: India's moon mission pushed to July first week (http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/008200802251521.htm) (new news)


India's first planetary mission, Chandrayaan-1, has now been rescheduled to take place in the first week of July as the mission personnel work overtime to sort out payload integration and launch-related issues.

"We are targeting the end of June. We will try to make it in the first week of July," a senior scientist associated with the Rs 386 crore moon mission told PTI here on Monday on condition of anonymity.

The lunar mission was originally scheduled for April this year, a time-frame targeted four years ago to get all the payloads well ahead of time and to galvanise the scientists into mission mode with a target to work on.

Indian Space Research Organisation officials insisted that there are no hardware problems and that the space agency is moving more cautiously to ensure that all systems are well tested before and after integration at each stage.

01101001
2008-Aug-08, 06:22 AM
The Times of India: Moon mission likely in October: ISRO (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Moon_mission_likely_in_October_ISRO/articleshow/3334456.cms)


CHENNAI: India's "ambitious" unmanned lunar mission 'Chandrayan' is likely to soar into the skies in October second week, Indian Space Research Organisation Chairman G Madhavan Nair said on Wednesday.

"The satellite integration is almost complete. And we would be entering the thermovac in about a week's time. It takes about 45-50 days for the launch after thermovac, after which we would declare the date," he told reporters here.

"The earliest is October," he said. As for the climatic conditions, October was favourable, and ISRO has to look at the appropriate alignment between planets also before deciding on the launch window, he said.

publiusr
2008-Aug-08, 05:33 PM
Titan IV, Delta IV/Saturn IB/Proton class LV
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSLV_III

01101001
2008-Sep-19, 12:54 AM
Planetary Society Weblog: Chandrayaan-1 update (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001651/):


There is an article in the Telegraph of Calcutta giving some detailed updates on the status of India's first lunar orbiter, Chandrayaan-1. The article states that Chandrayaan-1 has passed its thermal vacuum tests. Thermal vacuum testing is something that all spacecraft must undergo. Once the whole spacecraft has been assembled, it is placed inside a large vacuum chamber, and then cycled many times from low temperatures to high temperatures, to simulate the rigors of being in space. Chandrayaan-1 was cycled from -120°C to 150°C (-180°F to 300°F) and "all onboard instruments and electronics remained intact," according to the article. The spacecraft still has to undergo vibration testing (which mimics the rigors of launch). The article goes on to say that the Indian Space Research Organisation "hopes to launch Chandrayaan-1 next month."

ravens_cry
2008-Sep-19, 03:06 PM
Good on them. With Space I say, the more the merrier. Can't wait till this baby flies!

manmeetvirdi
2008-Sep-19, 04:42 PM
Hi to all of you.
This thread was started in Oct 2001, and I hope it get completed this October.
Am planning to visit Shriharikota to witness the launch but dates are not getting fixed up. It would do lot of good to India if this mission becomes a success because if it goes offtrack then there are lot of politician sitting to plug an end to these kind of mission for ever. They will only give funds to just launch satellites, finish.
There argument spending money to send a satellite to moon is just waste. Ya may be its just a waste, it has been explored heavily, but the technological break through needed to make this kind of mission is real benefit of which I think India will get hugely benefited. May be it will be a re- invention of a wheel, but still i'am sure this is going to help lift the moral, confidence and Can do attitude into Indians. I dont really see something to get proud of.

Just because a math problem has been solved by a student does not means that other should not because its a re-invention, other should and we all know this, and this I think hold true for Space program also. You have to and you should. All the countries involved in Space program are a developed nation there has to be a reason behind this. Cant remain with a Third world nation tag forever.

Wish this vechile all your wishings.............................please
God Speed Chandrayaan

01101001
2008-Oct-02, 03:03 AM
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)


The spacecraft is scheduled for launch on October 22 with a window fixed between October 19 and October 28.

Launch target:
2008, October 22, [time to be determined], Wednesday

3 weeks to launch

PraedSt
2008-Oct-02, 03:26 AM
I hope Chandrayaan is a success; but whether it is or is not, they'll get there eventually. There are a lot of good people over here.

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-02, 01:04 PM
Titan IV, Delta IV/Saturn IB/Proton class LV
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSLV_III

That may be a launcher that India is developing, but everything I read says that Chandrayaan is being launched by PSLV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polar_Satellite_Launch_Vehicle).

01101001
2008-Oct-07, 10:30 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Chandrayaan-1 update: Spacecraft delivered to Sriharikota, launch date October 22 (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001683/)


A couple of news sources now indicate that the launch of Chandrayaan-1 is scheduled for October 22. RIA Novosti informs us that the orbiter has been delivered to Sriharikota, the launch site.

Expanding the link farm:
ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/)
ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)
ISRO: Chandrayaan-1, India's first Mission to the Moon (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/home.htm)
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)
Planetary Society: Chandrayaan-I Mission (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/chandrayaan_1/)
Chandrayaan Lunar Mission (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/) (unofficial, by an enthusiast)

Launch target:
2008, October 22, [time to be determined], Wednesday

About 15 days to launch

djellison
2008-Oct-07, 11:03 PM
C1XS:
Chandrayaan-1 Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) through ESA -a collaboration between Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK and ISRO Satellite Centre, ISRO. Part of this payload is redesigned by ISRO to suit Chandrayaan-1 scientific objectives.

I was fortunate enough to visit RAL earlier this year and see C1XS. Well - the flight spare spectrometer (the flight instrument was in calibration), with the flight door on it, and the flight x-ray solar monitor. I've been working on an animation ( it's not great, but it's better than nothing, just about :D ) for them as a favor in my spare time. Will probably make it to the inter-tubes in the next few days!

Doug

xCygon
2008-Oct-08, 08:14 PM
thanks for info, 15 more days, nice

01101001
2008-Oct-08, 08:56 PM
Got a time offered up by ChennaiOnline: Excitement ahead of Chandrayaan launch (http://www.chennaionline.com/colnews/newsitem.asp?NEWSID=51ad2be5-2f09-431a-9ae7-723efb68534d&CATEGORYNAME=NATL)


Chandrayaan-I, India's first spacecraft mission beyond earth orbit, is slated to be launched onboard India's workhorse rocket PSLV-C11 at 6.20 a.M on October 22.

Another: Express Buzz: Chandrayan I will be launched on October 22 (http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/story.aspx?Title=Chandrayan+I+will+be+launched+on+ October+22&artid=1%7CDxP5PbLwc=&SectionID=7GUA38txp3s=&MainSectionID=wIcBMLGbUJI=&SectionName=zkvyRoWGpmWSxZV2TGM5XQ==&SEO=Sriharikotta,PSLV,Polar,%20Satellite,%20Launch ,%20Vehicl)


Chandrayan I will be launched on October 22 from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) in Sriharikotta and hit the moon on November 8.Launched by the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV), the Indian Space Research Organisation has been looking at the launch window between 6.20 am and 6.35 am on October 22, with 6.21 am as the optimum launch time (Lift Off Time), said SDSC Director M C Dattan, on Tuesday.

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1751 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2051 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0051 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0621 IST - India Standard Time (presumably), Wednesday

About 14 days to launch

PraedSt
2008-Oct-14, 02:22 PM
A report on two presentations about the Indian and Chinese space programmes. More strategy than specifics, although there are some of the latter. By Dwayne Day of The Space Review. Long article.


On October 6, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) sponsored a panel discussion with the National Institute for Advanced Study (NIAS) at AAAS headquarters in Washington, DC. NIAS is an Indian think tank based in Bangalore, and the discussion consisted of three presentations on the Indian space program, the future of the Indian nuclear program, and the need for professional accreditation of scientists. The presentations were followed by a panel discussion including the three presenters and three other NIAS representatives


On October 8, several American space experts spoke at The Heritage Foundation in Washington, DC on China’s space program. The speakers were Dean Cheng, of the Center for Naval Analysis; Kevin Pollpeter, China Program Manager of the Center for Intelligence Research and Analysis; and Scott Pace, the new director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University and former NASA associate administrator for program analysis and evaluation

http://thespacereview.com/article/1231/1

I've also posted this on the closest 'China in Space' thread I could find.
http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/78982-poor-man-s-space-station.html

01101001
2008-Oct-15, 12:51 AM
The Hindu: Chandrayaan-1 shifted to VAB (http://www.hindu.com/2008/10/15/stories/2008101559961300.htm)


CHENNAI: Hectic activity was under way at ISRO’s launch centre in Sriharikota, 100 km north of here on Tuesday, with the integration of the Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft with the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C11) proceeding smoothly.
[...]
“We are testing them so that we can get ready for the countdown. If the weather permits, the launch will take place on October 22. There are no other issues. Technically, we are in good shape. The whole team is in an upbeat mood,” Mr. Annadurai added.

The 52-hour final countdown starts from 4.00 a.m. on October 20.

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1751 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2051 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0051 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0621 IST - India Standard Time (presumably), Wednesday

7 days to launch

xCygon
2008-Oct-15, 06:06 PM
I'm so Excited :)

01101001
2008-Oct-17, 07:32 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Getting close to the launch of Chandrayaan-1! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001700/)


Chandrayaan-1 is due to launch on October 22 at 00:58 UTC (that's October 21 at 17:58 Pacific time; click here for a table of other cities). I am deeply grateful to the British Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) for actually posting the launch time -- it's the first time I'd seen it online (though I did eventually find slightly different launch times posted in some Indian news stories).

More there.

Small tweak to time:

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST - India Standard Time, Wednesday

About 4 days to launch

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-18, 08:27 PM
With reference to post #62, all the experimental modules clings to one that yellow color box.
This box is Is almost 90% of the satellite and yet there is no arrow discribing as to what it is!!

Also I wonder why ISRO does not comes up with full detials of everything. I can clearly see there is so much scarcity of pictures from ISRO and about the whole mission itself, totally unlike NASA. Clearly ISRO does not have PR department,pity.

djellison
2008-Oct-18, 09:03 PM
This box is Is almost 90% of the satellite and yet there is no arrow discribing as to what it is!!

It's the spacecraft bus - it's the structure to which everything is bolted, it contains computers, memory, radios, and in the middle it contains the fuel-tanks.

I hope to be at the launch event at the RAL on Wednesday morning ( very very early! ) and I may blog / ustream / youtube or something new-media just in case there isn't a live stream of the actual launch from anywhere.

Doug

xCygon
2008-Oct-19, 02:08 AM
Is there for us, public to see the launch or monitor the activity?

01101001
2008-Oct-20, 06:58 AM
Wall Street Journal: India to Launch Its First Unmanned Moon Mission (http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122445957987848613.html?mod=googlenews_wsj)


India's space program has its critics. Some argue that the Indian government is spending millions on space exploration while ignoring poverty at home, where per capita income is less than $1,000 a year, public health and education services are poor, and rising food and fuel prices are pinching citizens.

It also comes at a time when India's booming economic growth has begun to slow amid the global financial crisis. Inflation-adjusted growth in gross domestic product fell to 7.9% in the quarter ended June 30, falling below 8% for the first time in three years.

C.S. Unnikrishnan, a scientist with the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, in Mumbai, says that the lunar mission is driven by ISRO's desire to promote its business arm. "This mission will only project ISRO as a major player in commercial launch systems," he said.

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

42 hours to launch

01101001
2008-Oct-20, 07:11 AM
Is there for us, public to see the launch or monitor the activity?

ISRO.org (http://www.isro.org/):


Live Webcast 0550-0650 Hrs (IST) [0020-0120 UTC]

01101001
2008-Oct-20, 09:58 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Watch the Chandrayaan-1 launch live on the Internet! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001704/)

Provides the same ISRO.org webcast link cited above, and provides pictures and links of Chandaryaan-1 being assembled and proceeding to launch.


Helpful readers have been sending me some links to more information about this mission, including a detailed "brochure" about the Chandrayaan-1 mission, its hardware, and its science goals, and also a photo gallery with some MUCH better pictures than I'd seen before [...]

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

27 hours to launch

ryanmercer
2008-Oct-21, 10:49 AM
Less than a day :)

xCygon
2008-Oct-21, 04:02 PM
Less than a day :)

yep :)

01101001
2008-Oct-21, 05:29 PM
Link farm:
ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/)
ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)
ISRO: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/home.htm)
ESA: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)
Planetary Society: Chandrayaan-I Mission (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/chandrayaan_1/)
Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1) (unofficial)
Chandrayaan Lunar Mission (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/) (unofficial, by an enthusiast)

SHAR - Sriharikota Launching Range: map (http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/SPACE/space-centers.html#SHAR%20-%20Sriharikota%20Launching%20Range)

I think I found one launch complex on Google Map:
probably the Liquid booster satellite launch complex (http://maps.google.com/maps?ie=UTF8&ll=13.666358,80.226953&spn=0.004806,0.0078&t=h&z=17)

And I've just about gone blind seeking the other launch complexes, what with the pattern of dark vegetation on light sand of the barrier island. I'm not sure which complex gets used anyway for Chandrayaan, so I'll stop the hunt for now.

Recent update: Sify News: Skies clear, Chandrayaan on track (http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14781972)

BBC: India sets its sights on the Moon (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7681701.stm) (background)

Launch target (though I'm still seeing times in recent articles some minutes off):
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

7-1/2 hours to launch

PraedSt
2008-Oct-21, 06:22 PM
And I've just about gone blind seeking the other launch complexes...

Lol. Your sacrifice is appreciated. You run good mission threads on here, they've become my one-stop source for news in less than a month. ;)

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-21, 07:53 PM
41/2 hours to Launch !!!!!!!!!

Here is launch strategy for India's Lunar mission Chandrayaan-I.
Good one
http://www.ias.ac.in/jess/dec2005/ilc-15.pdf

Trajectory details of Chandryaan-I here (http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page9.htm)

xCygon
2008-Oct-21, 08:14 PM
Gallery on Flickr (http://flickr.com/photos/karthikvk/sets/72157608243672133/)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3269/2960993421_dc111ef844_o.jpg

probably same one's from Official site.

01101001
2008-Oct-21, 08:15 PM
This current Weather Underground radar map for Chennai, south of Sriharikota (http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=13.00000&lon=80.18000&zoom=8&type=hyb&rad=0&wxsn=0&svr=0&cams=0&sat=1&sat.num=1&sat.spd=25&sat.opa=85&sat.gtt1=109&sat.gtt2=108&sat.type=IR4&riv=0&mm=0&hur=0&fire=0) doesn't look so good.

Maybe it looks worse than it is.

Hindustan Times: Rain threat to moon mission (http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/StoryPage.aspx?sectionName=Cricket&id=084ce141-1554-46fe-b5ca-b6689fa56ac5&&Headline=Rain+threat+to+India%e2%80%99s+first+moon +mission) (Last Updated: 01:33 IST)


The scientists are not overly nervous about the weather, which has been playing truant with incessant rains over the last three days, during the countdown for the launch at 6.22 am on Wednesday.

A couple of times in the, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) has blasted off amid showers. Their anxiety, however, stems from the prospect of lightning and thunderstorm at dawn on Wednesday, which would force them to delay the flight either by a couple of minutes or till early the next morning.

“Rain per se is not an issue, but if there’s lightning or a thunderstorm, we have to delay the lift-off. We will take a call at 5.30 am,” Mylswamy Annadurai, Project Director, Chandrayaan-I, told Hindustan Times.

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-21, 08:27 PM
I hope weather does not spoil the sport !!
:sad:
And here (http://independentindian.com/2008/10/21/my-very-low-subjective-probabilities-on-indias-moon-mission/) the Chandryaan-I success to fail ratio analyzed.
:sad:

djellison
2008-Oct-21, 08:41 PM
Launch target (though I'm still seeing times in recent articles some minutes off):
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

7-1/2 hours to launch

Careful - India is working on a half-hour time zone.

0550 IST is when the webcast starts - which is 0020 UT.

Doug

JohnD
2008-Oct-21, 09:09 PM
From today's feature article in the UK Guardian newspaper: http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/oct/21/spaceexploration-india

"If all goes to plan, India's tricolour flag should be drifting down towards the freezing, airless lunar surface as dawn breaks over the subcontinent on November 11"
Of course, it won't be "drifting". This made me wonder - what will happen to something as light as a fabric flag that makes it to the Moon's surface at meteoric speed?

And by the way, isn't the Guardian's headline, "India's unmanned moon mission may launch race for lunar landgrab" a bit hyperbolic?

John

JonClarke
2008-Oct-21, 09:29 PM
The media does not seem to be able to get itself out of the "space race" mind set even thought it is nearly 40 years out of date and never applied to India in the first place.

Jon

xCygon
2008-Oct-21, 10:20 PM
is the live webcast working for you guys on Firefox?

djellison
2008-Oct-21, 10:25 PM
It's not due to start for a couple of hours yet - 0020 UT

Doug

01101001
2008-Oct-21, 10:26 PM
is the live webcast working for you guys on Firefox?

With Internet Explorer, it worked, showing recorded material, when I last cited it many articles ago, and it's working right now.

See ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/) for link to live webcast.

About 2 hours to start of live webcast coverage.

xCygon
2008-Oct-21, 10:26 PM
It's not due to start for a couple of hours yet - 0020 UT

Doug

they showing some small documentaries, its working on IE and Chrome

01101001
2008-Oct-21, 11:28 PM
The Times of India: India's first moon mission set for liftoff (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Indias_first_moon_mission_set_for_liftoff_/articleshow/3625806.cms)


CHENNAI: Hours before the launch of India's historic maiden mission to the moon, Chandrayaan-I — at 6.20am on Wednesday — the spaceport's hi-tech mission control room at Sriharikota was working at full tilt, with scientists continuously monitoring data on their computers and praying that the rain keeps off.

An ISRO spokesperson said the countdown was proceeding smoothly and all indications point to a flawless takeoff. Solid propellants in the six strap-on motors, as also in the first and third stages of the four-stage Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle, have been filled. The second and fourth stages of the 44.4-m tall rocket consist of liquid propellants which were filled in the last 24 hours.

[...]

Fears over rain, which has been frequent over the past few days, diminished on Tuesday. "There were intermittent rains all through the day at Sriharikota, but this was to be expected. As we have said earlier, even if it rains, we will launch, but there should not be any cyclonic depression," the spokesperson said.

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

90 minutes to launch

sohh_fly
2008-Oct-21, 11:45 PM
are the indians planning an attempt to land on the lunar surface with this launch? or are they just scoping things out for a run at the moon later on??

01101001
2008-Oct-21, 11:51 PM
are the indians planning an attempt to land on the lunar surface with this launch? or are they just scoping things out for a run at the moon later on??

It's an orbiter with a hammer probe.

Image of impact probe mating to orbiter (http://www.planetary.org/image/chandrayaan-02_lg.jpg) from Planetary Society Weblog: Watch the Chandrayaan-1 launch live on the Internet! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001704/)

ISRO: What is Chandrayaan-2? (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/chandrayaan2/index2.html)


The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is planning 2nd moon mission Chandrayaan-2 in 2011. Russia's Federal Space Agency (Roskosmos) is joining with ISRO for development of Chandrayaan-2 Lander/Rover.

Chandrayaan-2 will consist of the spacecraft and a landing platform with the moon rover.

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 12:26 AM
Its buffering a lot :(

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:28 AM
Live webcast on now (http://www.isro.org/brodcast.htm)

Nothing happening, but it says, "Welcome to Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR." Shows control room.

Getting some audio.

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

30 minutes to launch

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 12:35 AM
Live web cast started
Not working in firefox, but working in IE 7

What is being shown is same as what is being shown in National channel Doordarshan

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 12:37 AM
Live web cast started
Not working in firefox, but working in IE 7

What is being shown is same as what is being shown in National channel Doordarshan

is there way to watch doordarshan online?

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:39 AM
Anyone seen an official countdown that provides a launch time?

Launch target:
2008, October 21, 1758 PDT, Tuesday
2008, October 21, 2058 EDT, Tuesday
2008, October 22, 0058 UTC, Wednesday
2008, October 22, 0628 IST, Wednesday

20 minutes to launch

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 12:46 AM
the announcer is doing a countdown
he just said 8 mins

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:52 AM
Liftoff

normal

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:53 AM
At 1 minute

altitude 20 km

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 12:55 AM
2'nd satge ON

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:55 AM
3 minutes in

altitude 110 km

all good

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 12:55 AM
Yay, so far on right track.

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 12:56 AM
4 minutes

screen numbers stopped updating -- no it's OK

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 12:57 AM
3rd stage ON

ravens_cry
2008-Oct-22, 12:58 AM
I do believe we have lift off!

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 01:01 AM
4th satge ON
Everything normal and in course

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 01:04 AM
Planetary Society Weblog: LIFTOFF of Chandrayaan-1! India is on its way to the Moon! (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001706/)

Yeah, my webcast is pretty jerky. I am getting a good frame every minute or so. It's hard to follow.

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 01:06 AM
Heard 14 minutes.

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 01:10 AM
Injection? Did I hear?

Yes. Orbit!

Congratulations, India, Indians, all involved.

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 01:11 AM
Claaping in the Mission Control
Chandryaan-I sepreate from 4th stage !!!!!!!!!!!!

Crucial first 18 minutes performed perfectly.

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 01:14 AM
Standing Ovation to all Indian Scientists and people who worked on this project.

Don Alexander
2008-Oct-22, 01:19 AM
I add my congratulations!!! Let's hope orbital insertion works out, as well as all the instruments.

Things are going nicely recently... Fermi, the successful Falcon launch, IBEX, now the Indian mission.

ravens_cry
2008-Oct-22, 01:26 AM
Woo, hoo! They still have a long way to go, but congratulations on getting this far!

manmeetvirdi
2008-Oct-22, 01:45 AM
Woo, hoo! They still have a long way to go!

Yea no doubt !! Till now only PSLV has worked as planned, Chandryaan-I and its engine for orbit maneuver and its instrument, solar panel opening and then data collection and transmission for 2 years has to work well and only then mission is SUCCESS. Long way to go.



Chandrayaan-I will take 15 days to get to moon orbit. This part is really new for India. First time. Lets see.

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 01:55 AM
Planetary Society Weblog: Chandrayaan-1 launch was nominal (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001707/)

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 02:01 AM
Launch Video on BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7683350.stm)

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 04:47 AM
Where are my links? Oh, there they are:
ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/)
ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)
ISRO: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/home.htm)
ESA: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)
Planetary Society: Chandrayaan-I Mission (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/chandrayaan_1/)
Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1) (unofficial)
Chandrayaan Lunar Mission (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/) (unofficial, by an enthusiast)

===

NewsToday: Chandrayaan-I began its historic journey (http://newstodaynet.com/newsindex.php?id=11623%20&%20section=21)


India becomes the sixth nation, after the US, Russia, European Space Agency, China and Japan, to send a mission to the moon.
[...]
The launch was perfect and precise. The satellite has been placed in the earth orbit. With this, we have completed the first leg of the mission and it will take 15 days to reach the lunar orbit, Nair said.

That makes it about 9.5 days to reach lunar transfer orbit, with a series of 5 progressively larger loops around Earth. Then 5.5 days from that point to reach lunar orbit insertion.

The ISRO Chandaryann brochure (http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/) has a schematic of the trip to the moon on page 9, Chandrayaan-1: The Journey (http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/brochure/page9.htm).

JohnD
2008-Oct-22, 07:03 AM
From that video, India clearly had no problem launching into low cloud cover, whereas US launches seem to wait for clear skies.
Different attitude to control, or to PR?

According to the video on the ISRO website, the flight plan is for progressively higher earth orbits, until one that intersects with the Moon's orbit. Then a transfer to a wide Moon orbit, which is then contracted down to a circular polar one. Is this a series of planetary fly-bys, to conserve fuel or is it to allow opportunities for correction, 'fine-tuning' as each new orbit is reached?
Either way, seems to be an innovative approach by India.

John

Sticks
2008-Oct-22, 07:41 AM
Anyone fancy a curry to celebrate India's great achievement?
:D

JonClarke
2008-Oct-22, 07:44 AM
Curry sounds good!

This is the 109th lunar mission from planet Earth (including Apollo).

Jon

JonClarke
2008-Oct-22, 07:46 AM
Yea no doubt !! Till now only PSLV has worked as planned, Chandryaan-I and its engine for orbit maneuver and its instrument, solar panel opening and then data collection and transmission for 2 years has to work well and only then mission is SUCCESS. Long way to go.

Since this is their first lunar mission I would say that if they return data from lunar orbit it is a success.

Beyond that there would be some very specific technical goals the mission will have to achieve, but they should be achieved well before the two years are up.

But a successful launch is always a very good start.

Jon

PraedSt
2008-Oct-22, 08:08 AM
From that video, India clearly had no problem launching into low cloud cover, whereas US launches seem to wait for clear skies.

I was wondering about that too. Different type of clouds maybe? Cloud types vary in their gusting and lightning characteristics. :question:

JonClarke
2008-Oct-22, 10:34 AM
It is the end of the south west monsoon, so you can get very heavy rain clouds and thunderstorms. But presumably with weather radar etc. they can tell whether or not it is safe to launch through them.

Jon

Disinfo Agent
2008-Oct-22, 02:08 PM
Congratulations, India! Well done. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Whirlpool
2008-Oct-22, 03:18 PM
Congratulations to India.


http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/emoticons7/1.gif

01101001
2008-Oct-22, 03:36 PM
From that video, India clearly had no problem launching into low cloud cover, whereas US launches seem to wait for clear skies.
Different attitude to control, or to PR?

Are you thinking of NASA manned flights or launches in general? I expect manned rules are much more stringent, requiring more visibility, but even they allow some clouds. The rules are fairly complex, according to SPACE SHUTTLE WEATHER LAUNCH COMMIT CRITERIA (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/2000/15-00.htm) (1999). There seems to be a lot of concern for lightning and turbulence, and there was for the Chandrayaan launch, too. Maybe it's as simple as a different character to the typical clouds for the locations. I'd expect the weather to be different.


According to the video on the ISRO website, the flight plan is for progressively higher earth orbits, until one that intersects with the Moon's orbit. Then a transfer to a wide Moon orbit, which is then contracted down to a circular polar one. Is this a series of planetary fly-bys, to conserve fuel or is it to allow opportunities for correction, 'fine-tuning' as each new orbit is reached?
Either way, seems to be an innovative approach by India.

I think it's the unmanned, no-rush, more-bang-for-the-fuel-load approach that gets more payload to the Moon. It's reminiscent of the recent approaches of both Japan's Kaguya and China's Chang'e in 2007. Kaguya/SELENE launched September 13 and performed lunar insertion October 3. Chang'e launched October 24 and reached lunar orbit November 5. BMDO/NASA Clementine took about a month from launch to lunar insertion, in 1994.

xCygon
2008-Oct-22, 04:34 PM
Launch video

1/4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZbGXrxR4U4
2/4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_S3GeL8AjEQ
3/4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEg-uWjPDFI
4/4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT9SpPJvHck

suntrack2
2008-Oct-22, 05:18 PM
The polar sattelite launch vehicle took the aperatus in the skies early morning today at between 6.am to 6.15 am.

There are several other aperatus attached with the pslv, by USA,esa and others.

search of He-3, moon maping, 3D map of moon and more other features will be take place there on, the sattelite will enter in the Lunar orbital path later and will start to send the pictures of the Moon.

Other news are awaited. During the launching hours there was raining.

Sunil

(what is your reaction), please state.

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-22, 05:50 PM
How about well over 100 posts of opinions on the ongoing thread (http://www.bautforum.com/space-exploration/4713-india-moon.html)?

ToSeek
2008-Oct-22, 06:59 PM
Threads merged.

slang
2008-Oct-22, 08:08 PM
Are you thinking of NASA manned flights or launches in general? I expect manned rules are much more stringent, requiring more visibility, but even they allow some clouds. The rules are fairly complex, according to SPACE SHUTTLE WEATHER LAUNCH COMMIT CRITERIA (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/release/2000/15-00.htm) (1999).

I seem to remember that the rules wrt to clouds have changed some to allow ground telescopes/cameras a better view to detect debris events. But maybe that was just for the Return To Flight missions. Can't find reference :/

ryanmercer
2008-Oct-23, 10:36 AM
Awesome. :)

Sticks
2008-Oct-23, 12:22 PM
I never did manage to get my curry :sad:

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-23, 02:38 PM
I never did manage to get my curry :sad:
Well; we're not serving that now because we don't wan't to exclude Whirlpool (http://www.bautforum.com/1348363-post16.html). How about a nice spicy hot bowl of chili?

01101001
2008-Oct-23, 03:46 PM
Sify News: Chandrayaan's orbit raised (http://sify.com/news/fullstory.php?id=14783623)


Bangalore/Thiruvananthapuram: A day after its flawless launch, India's Chandrayaan-1 steadily made its journey to the moon after the first orbit-raising manoeuvre of the lunar spacecraft was today successfully performed by scientists.

Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said the satellite's health was normal and it was on the right track.

In the first of the five orbit raising manoeuvres, today's operation was performed at 0900 hours when the satellite's 440 Newton Liquid Engine was fired for about 18 minutes by commanding the spacecraft from Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC) at ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) in Bangalore.

Thiruvananthapuram. Cool name. It's the capital of the state of Kerala.

There's a nice diagram of the burn sequence, though it doesn't have the dates or times:
ISRO: Chandryaan-1 Mission: Mission Profile :: Mission Sequence (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/mission_sequence.htm)

===

Links. Not just for breakfast anymore.
ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/)
ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)
ISRO: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/home.htm)
ESA: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)
Planetary Society: Chandrayaan-I Mission (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/chandrayaan_1/)
Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1) (unofficial)
Chandrayaan Lunar Mission (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/) (unofficial, by an enthusiast)

Antares7
2008-Oct-23, 04:37 PM
I wish India would focus on its overpopulation and social injustices (especially to its "untouchables") issues before going to the Moon.

PraedSt
2008-Oct-23, 04:46 PM
I wish India would focus on its overpopulation

O yes? How would you fix overpopulation then? :confused:

Edit: On second thoughts, best not to hijack this thread. Could you start another one please, Antares7? I'd love to discuss this with you...

01101001
2008-Oct-23, 08:40 PM
OK. I see we have to transfer our audio countdown technology to India. It's a tip all you amateur counterdowners can use, too. I learned it in a studio TV control room.

This video of the launch (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYGofKL8FN8) (YouTube video, about 30 seconds) shows a countdown clock, with resolution in thousandths of a second (well, to the grosser resolution of slower video frames), with an audio countdown in seconds.

Now, maybe it was simply edited wrong. It might have been produced by an amateur who didn't know better, but a professional video editor should know how to do countdowns. And, maybe the anounced countdown was for liftoff, and the timer was for ignition. I don't know. I can think of a dozen excuses. (This is just for fun.) So, maybe ISRO already knows this. But... maybe the ISRO announcer was unprepared, or overly excited.

When the clock turns over, say, from 4.000 to 3.999, an untrained brain, seeing the units digit change, thinks that is the time to say, "3." But it's not. That's when one should say, "4."

Very common error. I've seen it a thousand times.

If you don't say it right, when the clock goes from 1.000 to 0.999, you wind up announcing, "0!" while in reality there is still a long second to go before actual zero is reached. If anyone is actually taking action on your words (I doubt it, in the professional rocket-launching business), they might do so too early.

Handy wallet guide. Clip and save! ------ 8< -------------------------------

Countdown clock transition / Time to announce
4.000 -> 3.999 / "4"
3.000 -> 2.999 / "3"
2.000 -> 1.999 / "2"
1.000 -> 0.999 / "1"
0.000 -> +0.001 / "0"

Doodler
2008-Oct-23, 09:37 PM
I wish India would focus on its overpopulation and social injustices (especially to its "untouchables") issues before going to the Moon.

Coulda said much the same about the US in the 50's. And Russia & China...well...less said, the better.

If you want to wait for the day when we can all sit around and sing Khumbaya, ya might as well get used to the idea of never getting anywhere.

xCygon
2008-Oct-24, 01:25 AM
http://planetary.org/image/chandrayaan-1_launch.jpg

KaiYeves
2008-Oct-24, 01:54 AM
Beautiful pic of the launch, xCygon!

Bolasanibk
2008-Oct-26, 06:03 AM
Orbit Raised Again (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct25_2008a.htm)
Apogee: 74,715 Km
Perigee: 336 Km

01101001
2008-Oct-26, 03:57 PM
Orbit Raised Again (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct25_2008a.htm)
Apogee: 74,715 Km
Perigee: 336 Km

October 26 press release: Chandrayaan-1 enters Deep Space (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Oct26_2008.htm) (from ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm))


Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft has entered deep space after crossing the 150,000 km (one and a half lakh km) distance mark from the Earth. This happened after the successful completion of the spacecraft’s third orbit raising manoeuvre today (October 26, 2008) morning.

During this manoeuvre which was initiated at 07:08 IST, the spacecraft’s 440 Newton liquid engine was fired for about nine and a half minutes. With this, Chandrayaan-1 entered a much higher elliptical orbit around the Earth. The apogee (farthest point to Earth) of this orbit lies at 164,600 km while the perigee (nearest point to Earth) is at 348 km. In this orbit, Chandrayaan-1 takes about 73 hours to go round the Earth once.

I guess that was Earth Burn (EBN) 3, though a mission sequence diagram (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/mission_sequence.htm) says the result would be 200 000 km apogee. Maybe that was old info. I'll go with the news.

Up next in a couple of days, when Chandrayaan 1 loops back near Earth, is EBN4 which might yield roughly a quarter-million km apogee, and then, in some more days, EBN5 to head to the Moon.

Bolasanibk
2008-Oct-29, 02:12 PM
Chandrayaan-1’s Orbit Closer to Moon (http://isro.org/pressrelease/Oct29_2008.htm)
Perigee: 465 Km
Apogee: 267,000 Km

01101001
2008-Nov-01, 06:27 PM
BA Blog: Chandrayaan-1 view the Earth (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2008/11/01/chandrayaan-1-view-the-earth/)


The Indian lunar probe Chandrayaan-1 is slowly making its way to the Moon; it’ll be another week before it gets there. In the meantime, the ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization) has been testing the cameras by taking images of the Earth.

ISRO press release: Chandrayaan-1 Camera Tested (http://isro.org/pressrelease/Oct31_2008.htm)

Edit: Also, Planetary Society Weblog: On its way to the Moon, Chandrayaan-1 photographs Earth, but flips the photo (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001721/)

xCygon
2008-Nov-01, 10:29 PM
black and white? not colored?

still nice, and amazing

01101001
2008-Nov-01, 11:31 PM
not colored?

Wikipedia: Chandrayaan-1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan-1):


The Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) is a CCD camera with 5 m resolution and a 40 km swath in the panchromatic band and will be used to produce a high-resolution map of the Moon. [...] The camera works in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum and captures black and white stereo images.

01101001
2008-Nov-04, 08:12 AM
Here we go...

ISRO November 4 press release: Chandrayaan-1 enters Lunar Transfer Trajectory (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov04_2008.htm) (from ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm))


The fifth and final orbit raising manoeuvre of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft was successfully carried out today (November 4, 2008) morning at 04:56 am IST. During this manoeuvre, the spacecraft’s 440 Newton liquid engine was fired for about two and a half minutes. With this, Chandrayaan-1 entered the Lunar Transfer Trajectory with an apogee (farthest point to Earth) of about 380,000 km (three lakh eighty thousand km).

[...] Chandrayaan-1 will approach the Moon on November 8, 2008 and the spacecraft’s liquid engine will be fired again to insert the spacecraft into lunar orbit.

Edit: Also, Planetary Society Weblog: Chandrayaan-1 to enter lunar orbit on November 8 (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001725/) and BA Blog: It’s a new day… for Chandrayaan-1 (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2008/11/05/its-a-new-day-for-chadrayaan-1/)

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-04, 02:17 PM
Beautiful shot!

Prakshepak
2008-Nov-07, 10:40 PM
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2008/11/06/stories/2008110650031400.htm

On Chandrayaan-1 s Terrain Mapping Camera

01101001
2008-Nov-08, 03:23 AM
ISRO November 4 press release: Chandrayaan-1 enters Lunar Transfer Trajectory (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov04_2008.htm) (from ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm))


Chandrayaan-1 will approach the Moon on November 8, 2008 and the spacecraft’s liquid engine will be fired again to insert the spacecraft into lunar orbit.

Must be close now.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-08, 04:12 AM
http://www.hindu.com/seta/2008/11/06/stories/2008110650031400.htm

On Chandrayaan-1 s Terrain Mapping Camera

It says here (my bold):
The Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on-board Chandrayaan-1 is a unique demonstration of space scientists’ ingenuity. It will be able to produce a 3D atlas of the moon using a single camera.and
“It is due to the innovative design of the camera,” Dr. Kumar said. “A set of two mirrors in the camera are used to provide two angles apart from the nadir [view from the top] view.”Really smart idea I think, but is the article correct? Has anyone else flown a 3D camera in space before? 01101001?

01101001
2008-Nov-08, 04:54 AM
Really smart idea I think, but is the article correct? Has anyone else flown a 3D camera in space before?

I don't recall a design like that -- but I don't recall much about all the cameras that have been on spacecraft. Certainly we've had 3D imaging, but the systems I can recall used two cameras, or a single camera on two different passes.

This design is different in that there is one camera with 3 separate viewing ports and mirrors to guide the light in.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-08, 05:20 AM
I don't recall a design like that -- but I don't recall much about all the cameras that have been on spacecraft. Certainly we've had 3D imaging, but the systems I can recall used two cameras, or a single camera on two different passes.

This design is different in that there is one camera with 3 separate viewing ports and mirrors to guide the light in.

Ah, thanks. So it might be the first 3D camera at least. That's pretty cool. I was looking at the graphic in that article, seemed like a smart design. Thanks.

Prakshepak
2008-Nov-08, 05:25 AM
Ah, thanks. So it might be the first 3D camera at least. That's pretty cool. I was looking at the graphic in that article, seemed like a smart design. Thanks.

ISRO has stereo imaging earth observation satellites, but I think they use two cameras. Here it is achieved by single camera looking at a single spot 3 times in a orbit during at different angles.

PraedSt
2008-Nov-08, 05:56 AM
Here it is achieved by single camera looking at a single spot 3 times in a orbit during at different angles.

Yeah, I saw that. Same spot, three different angles, three different times (sequentially). It'll take some nifty software work to sort out! But I'm sure they're used to that. Interesting design.

Bolasanibk
2008-Nov-08, 06:10 AM
I don't recall a design like that -- but I don't recall much about all the cameras that have been on spacecraft. Certainly we've had 3D imaging, but the systems I can recall used two cameras, or a single camera on two different passes.

This design is different in that there is one camera with 3 separate viewing ports and mirrors to guide the light in.

CARTOSAT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CARTOSAT)

As 01101001 pointed out it uses two cameras to produce the 3D images.

Sample Image (http://isro.org/Cartosat/images/Cartosat-1_3D_imagery.jpg)

Bolasanibk
2008-Nov-08, 06:11 AM
Must be close now.

The burn is scheduled at 17:30 IST (1200 UTC) Nov 8.

djellison
2008-Nov-08, 10:20 AM
Has anyone else flown a 3D camera in space before? 01101001?

Seem comparatively similar to the HRSC on MEX.

ravens_cry
2008-Nov-08, 12:00 PM
There is a lot of Apollo 3D shots, if you take the time to look at the Apollo archive. Also, because of settling during landing that caused a shift in position, stereographic shots were taken with Luna 9.

Bolasanibk
2008-Nov-08, 12:10 PM
And we are there. Chandrayaan enters lunar orbit. :)

ISRO (http://isro.org/pressrelease/Nov08_2008.htm)

JohnD
2008-Nov-08, 01:22 PM
According to the video on the ISRO website, the flight plan is for progressively higher earth orbits, until one that intersects with the Moon's orbit. Then a transfer to a wide Moon orbit, which is then contracted down to a circular polar one. Is this a series of planetary fly-bys, to conserve fuel or is it to allow opportunities for correction, 'fine-tuning' as each new orbit is reached?
John

Answering my own Q, according to a recent newspaper profile of G Madhavan Nair, the ISRO Chairman (I've lost the paper, sorry!), he decided only two months ago to change the flight plan, from a direct, Apollo-like course direct into Moon orbit, to the actual incremental one, to allow fine tuning of the direction. Full marks for such a redundant design that this was possible, no marks for foresight.

John

manmeetvirdi
2008-Nov-08, 09:06 PM
Madhavan Nair, the ISRO Chairman,decided only two months ago to change the flight plan, from a direct, Apollo-like course direct into Moon orbit, to the actual incremental one, to allow fine tuning of the direction. Full marks for such a redundant design that this was possible, no marks for foresight.
John

Congrats For making the Chandrayaan to enter the Lunar orbit !!
For the first time its time to talk perilune and apolune!!

As far as above statemenent of Madhavan Nair goes I think, India does not have rocket to put satellite in Apollo like orbit. Proof India does not have ICBM's ;-)
Mr Nair did you came to know about this only two months before launch???

PraedSt
2008-Nov-10, 09:26 AM
Proof India does not have ICBM's...

I'm glad you mentioned ICBMs. Because I went looking. You're technically correct:
Agni (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agni_missile_system), an Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile
Surya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surya_missile), an ICBM under development

Only technically. :)

Anyway, that isn't why I'm glad. While investigating, I found this:
In May 2008 Indian scientists announced they had developed and patented a path-breaking technology increases the range of missiles and satellite launch vehicles by at least 40%.The enhanced range is made possible by adding a special-purpose coating of chromium based material to a rocket's blunt nose cone. The material acts as a reactive-ablative coating that forms a thin low density gaseous layer at the tip of the rocket as it approaches hypersonic speeds; this super-heated gas layer reduces drag by 47% (at mach 7-8), thereby allowing range enhancements at least 40%:eek: That's huge!

This method seems conceptually similar to a rumour I'd read about: many years ago the Russians discovered a way of reducing high velocity drag by firing lasers into the air-stream. I'm preparing a thread as we speak. I bet you all can't wait... :)

ravens_cry
2008-Nov-11, 09:47 AM
I'm glad you mentioned ICBMs. Because I went looking. You're technically correct:
Agni (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agni_missile_system), an Intermediate Range Ballistic Missile
Surya (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surya_missile), an ICBM under development

Only technically. :)

Anyway, that isn't why I'm glad. While investigating, I found this::eek: That's huge!

This method seems conceptually similar to a rumour I'd read about: many years ago the Russians discovered a way of reducing high velocity drag by firing lasers into the air-stream. I'm preparing a thread as we speak. I bet you all can't wait... :)
Woah, that IS huge. In a time when space travel is reinventing the wheel, and even advances in computer speed are slowing down, that is MEGA huge.
But is there any new news on Chandrayaan 1?

PraedSt
2008-Nov-11, 12:33 PM
Seem comparatively similar to the HRSC on MEX.

Sorry mate, just saw your post! After a quick search, it turns out that you were right, as usual. Instrument design: HRSC (http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/index.cfm?fobjectid=34826&fbodylongid=1597)
Stereo imaging is performed using nadir-directed, forward looking (+18.9°), and aft-looking (-18.9°) line sensors with a spectral range of 675 ± 90 nm. Known as triple panchromatic along-track stereo, this technique permits robust stereo reconstruction by on-ground digital processing and rectification through attitude reconstruction, feature matching and bundle adjustment, followed by the generation of digital terrain models and higher-level products. In general, the nadir-looking channel delivers the highest resolution images, while the two outer stereo channel images will be transmitted at lower resolution after pixel summation.So the boys at ISRO may have been exaggerating slightly. Maybe it was like that sports thread we had a little while back. The first 3D camera launched in the month of October, on a Wednesday, before noon. :D

01101001
2008-Nov-11, 04:10 PM
But is there any new news on Chandrayaan 1?

Was.

From ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm):

First Lunar Orbit Reduction Manoeuvre of Chandrayaan-1 Successfully Carried Out (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov10_2008.htm):


The first orbit reduction manoeuvre of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft which is orbiting the moon, was successfully performed yesterday (November 9, 2008) night. As part of that manoeuvre which began at 20:03 IST, the 440 Newton liquid engine of the spacecraft was fired for about 57 seconds. With this, the nearest point of Chandrayaan-1’s orbit (periselene) from the moon’s surface was reduced from 504 km to 200 km while the farthest point (aposelene) remained unchanged at 7,502 km. In this elliptical orbit, Chandrayaan-1 takes about ten and a half hours to circle the moon once.

===

Ceci n'est pas un lien ferme (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Link_farm).
ISRO, Indian Space Research Organisation (http://www.isro.org/)
ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)
ISRO: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/home.htm)
ESA: Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)
Wikipedia: Chandrayaan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chandrayaan)
Planetary Society: Chandrayaan-I Mission (http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/chandrayaan_1/)
Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1) (unofficial)
Chandrayaan Lunar Mission (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/) (unofficial, by an enthusiast)

01101001
2008-Nov-11, 09:55 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Chandrayaan-1's first picture of the Moon (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001734/)


Here is the first image taken by Chandrayaan-1 of the Moon, taken while it was still in Earth orbit on November 4. It's a bit underwhelming -- until you realize that the camera was designed to take photos of the Moon from a distance 3,000 times closer than this.

ISRO Images From Chandrayaan-1 (http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/moon_images.htm):

http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/imagesfromchandrayaan/Moon_Enh01.jpg (http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/imagesfromchandrayaan/Moon_Enh.jpg)

01101001
2008-Nov-12, 05:36 AM
I just found Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1). (Edit: Sorry. Beware that it's unofficial.)


thank you, will be in 100 kms circular polar orbit in next 24 hrs, I reckon. 15 minutes ago from mobile web in reply to NASA_SDO_HMI
[...]
Thats my second lunar orbit shrinking to get to a 100 kms circular orbit around the moon. about 7 hours ago from mobile web
My orbit was shrunk to 255.3 kms (aposelene) and 101.3 kms (pericelene) and it takes me a little more than 2 hrs to go around the moon. about 7 hours ago from mobile web
[...]
The moon impact will happen either on Nov 14/15. Exact details would spoil all the fun. Keep your eyes on the Shackleton crater. about 12 hours ago from mobile web

Sounds like they're going to apply the calibrated hammer to Shackleton. Maybe the idea was to look for ice/water -- but, didn't recent evidence indicate ice was unlikely? Well, it's probably still the best hope.

Edit: Here it is: Universe Today: Life Will be Hard for Colonists - Kaguya Can't Find Water on the Moon (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/10/23/life-will-be-hard-for-colonists-kaguya-cant-find-water-on-the-moon/)


It's been a long-held belief that the Moon is hiding significant quantities of water ice, safe from the Sun's ablative effects inside shady craters. One such crater is called Shackleton at the lunar South Pole and previous Moon missions have indicated it might hold a large reservoir of ice for all the water needs of future Moon colonists. Alas, the Japanese lunar mission Kaguya (or the Selenological and Engineering Explorer - "SELENE") has taken a peek into the crater to find… nothing. At least, it hasn't spotted any significant quantities of surface ice.

aquitaine
2008-Nov-12, 08:02 AM
and even advances in computer speed are slowing down

How so?

ravens_cry
2008-Nov-12, 09:05 AM
How so?
Look at the Duel core processors. Sure, they are nice and zippy, but instead of one processor, we have two, so DUH it is more zippy. But it needing two instead of one, says to me that personal computing is hitting a wall of sorts. How hard and tall it is only time will tell.

Nicolas
2008-Nov-12, 11:49 AM
That wall is the minimum transistor size limit, as far as I understood.

01101001
2008-Nov-12, 01:34 PM
I just found Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1).

I just noticed it is unofficial. It's probably just speculation by a fan. I'm removing it from the link farm. I should have been more skeptical.

HypothesisTesting
2008-Nov-12, 04:20 PM
Yeah it appears that India and China are the future of manned spaceflight.

You're correct,

and this didn't have to happen. My grumpy disposition ( a version of GOM) focuses on lost opportunities and in 1972 I was totally against cancelling Apollo and the diversion into the shuttle by US. I still can't believe US didn't go forward and have a thriving moon base for these 30 years. Although totally debunked by now, I can see why the moon conspiracies started. It made no sense to cancel the moon missions.:sick::confused:

01101001
2008-Nov-12, 05:18 PM
From ISRO Press Releases (http://www.isro.org/recent_events.htm)

Chandrayaan-1 Successfully Reaches its Operational Lunar Orbit (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov12_2008.htm)


Today, Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft has successfully reached its intended operational orbit at a height of about 100 km from the lunar surface. This followed a series of three orbit reduction manoeuvres conducted during the past three days by repeatedly firing the spacecraft’s 440 Newton Liquid Engine. As part of these manoeuvres, the engine was fired for a cumulative duration of about sixteen minutes. As a result of these manoeuvres, the farthest point of Chandrayaan-1’s orbit (aposelene) from the moon’s surface was first reduced from 7,502 km to 255 km and finally to 100 km while the nearest point (periselene) was reduced from 200 km to 182 km and finally to 100 km.
[...]
The next major event of Chandrayaan-1 mission planned in the coming days is the release of Moon Impact Probe (MIP) from the spacecraft and its eventual hitting of the moon’s surface.

Congratulations, again, to India, Indians, ISRO, and all involved! Great achievement.

The Chandrayaan1 Twitter (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1) speculated on a Friday (India time) release of the impact probe. Also, the Twitter mentioned conveying a message to the Chandrayaan team, so it might be slightly more than just a fan -- or maybe it is just a fan who knows an email address inside ISRO: "Will convey msg to the team. Good question, will ask and get back to you." I can't tell how reliable the information might be.

cjameshuff
2008-Nov-12, 06:22 PM
Look at the Duel core processors. Sure, they are nice and zippy, but instead of one processor, we have two, so DUH it is more zippy. But it needing two instead of one, says to me that personal computing is hitting a wall of sorts. How hard and tall it is only time will tell.

It's just a change in the way computer power is increased, and not the first one. RAM used to run at the same clock rate as the processor...then fancy memory controllers and multiple layers of cache came into use, due to the difficulty in getting large capacity RAM chips to work at high speeds. Processors used to fetch and execute one instruction at a time, then makers started to pipeline them, first fetching one instruction while executing the previous, and then lengthening the pipelines to support multiple instructions "in flight" at a time, sacrificing branch performance to efficiently handle highly predictable streams of instructions. Hyperthreading allowed a higher degree of parallelism on a single core, and multicore allows fully independent threads of execution to proceed simultaneously.

There *are* physical limits that determine the way things have developed...assume a 20 cm path from the processor to the RAM module, 0.8c signal propagation velocity, and no processing delays on the way there. A 3 GHz processor will execute 2.5 instructions by the time a read or write even reaches the RAM. At high speeds, clock skew across the die of the processor itself becomes more and more of an issue. Multiple cores allow processing power to be increased further without making these issues worse. It wasn't widely done before because it is very expensive in terms of silicon space, and it's done now because that price has become more reasonable in comparison to that of increasing clock rate.

01101001
2008-Nov-12, 10:05 PM
We'll tuck it in here, but some day it may well warrant a topic of its own.

Zeenews.com: ISRO to develop Sun mission 'Aditya' (http://www.zeenews.com/Sci-Tech/Space-/2008-11-10/482278news.html)


Bangalore, Nov 10: After the success of Chandrayaan -1, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has conceptually developed a Sun mission called ''Aditya''.

ISRO Chairman G. Madhavan Nair, said the success of Chandrayaan -1 has boosted the confidence of ISRO scientists to look beyond the moon.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-12, 11:10 PM
You know, as a fan of Ernest Shackleton, I'd actually be happy if it turned out it held no ice and his namesake crater didn't have to get whacked.

Prakshepak
2008-Nov-13, 08:16 AM
http://www.hindu.com/fline/fl2324/stories/20061215001909000.htm

Space Exploration related developments in India

xCygon
2008-Nov-14, 02:41 AM
aditya mission sounds interesting, any more details on it?

01101001
2008-Nov-14, 03:24 AM
Twitter: Chandrayaan 1 (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1)


I will drop the 29kgs MIP tmrw at 10 pm(IST). It has miniature flags painted on 4 sides to signify India's entry on the moon. about 18 hours ago from mobile web

Moon Impact Probe, MIP (http://www.chandrayaan-i.com/chandrayaan1/how/payloads/mip.html)


The impact probe weighing 29 kg will ride piggyback on the top deck of the main orbiter and will be released at a predetermined time after the orbiter reaches the final 100km orbit to impact at a pre-selected location. During the descent phase it is in spin-stabilized configuration. The total flight time from release to impact on Moon will be close to twenty minutes.
[...]

Radar Altimeter - for measurement of altitude of the Moon Impact Probe above the lunar surface and qualify technologies for future landing missions. The operating frequency band is 4.3 GHz � 100 MHz
Video Imaging System - for acquiring images of the surface of moon from the descending probe. The video imaging system consists of analog CCD camera along with a video decoder
Mass Spectrometer - A state-of-the-art Quadrupole mass spectrometer with a mass resolution of 0.5 amu and sensitive to partial pressure of the order of 10-15 torr for measuring the constituents of tenuous lunar atmosphere during descent.


Impactor release:
November 14, 0830 PST, Friday
November 14, 1130 EST, Friday
November 14, 1630 UTC, Friday
November 14, 2200 IST, Friday

(Most say 2200 IST release, but one news report (Times of India (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/India/Tricolour_has_a_date_with_moon_tonight/articleshow/3710598.cms)) has the impactor landing at 2030 IST.)

01101001
2008-Nov-14, 05:38 PM
Impactor release:
November 14, 0830 PST, Friday
November 14, 1130 EST, Friday
November 14, 1630 UTC, Friday
November 14, 2200 IST, Friday

Haven't heard. Haven't looked. Shall look...

Looks like it was released about 3 hours ago. Impact near Shackleton.

Twitter (http://twitter.com/Chandrayaan1):


@zvezdichko - no data from MIP after impacting surface.
less than a minute ago from mobile web in reply to Zvezdichko
The impact has caused the instruments to not continue functioning but not before providing useful descent data. 2 minutes ago from mobile web
Geting mixed info about status of MIP. Still awaiting official word from ground control after data analysis. about 1 hour ago from mobile web
Thank you everyone for your congragulations. about 1 hour ago from mobile web
Impact was close to Shackleton crater. about 1 hour ago from mobile web
According to initial reports, MIP has survived the landing. I'll be studying the debris for more details along with data sent back about 1 hour ago from mobile web
@cfrjlr - please re confirm. For us, the most important thing is that the Indian tricolor is now on the moon. about 2 hours ago from mobile web in reply to cfrjlr
@tavigreiner - 4th country to plant flag on the moon. about 2 hours ago from mobile web in reply to TaviGreiner
@cfrjlr - 4th country to plant flag on moon after USA, USSR and European Union (17 countries) about 2 hours ago from mobile web in reply to cfrjlr
REPEAT MIP successfully reaches lunar surface. about 2 hours ago from mobile web

ISRO Press Release: Indian Tricolour Placed on the Moon on Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru’s Birthday (http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/Nov14_2008.htm)


In a historic event, the Indian space programme achieved a unique feat today (November 14, 2008) with the placing of Indian tricolour on the Moon’s surface on Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru’s birthday. The Indian flag was painted on the sides of Moon Impact Probe (MIP), one of the 11 payloads of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft, that successfully hit the lunar surface today at 20:31 hrs (8:31 pm) IST. This is the first Indian built object to reach the surface of the moon. The point of MIP’s impact was near the Moon’s South Polar Region. It may be recalled that the modern Indian space programme was initiated in 1962 when Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru was the Prime Minister of India. [...]

If the impact was 2031 IST, release was even earlier, 2006 IST. All the sources I saw were wrong, but Times of India gets closeness points.

Prakshepak
2008-Nov-14, 09:20 PM
http://isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/moon_images.htm

manmeetvirdi
2008-Nov-15, 12:48 AM
Will the altimeter graph taken by MIP will be published by ISRO for the public.
I think in few days time it should. I remember NASA doing so in case of Phoenix.

01101001
2008-Nov-16, 03:13 AM
Same pictures, I think.

Planetary Society Weblog: Pictures from the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Impact Probe (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001742/)


There are a few confusions circulating on the Internet about this event that I'd like to clear up to the best of my knowledge. First of all, some news outlets are reporting that the Moon Impact Probe "landed" on the surface, implying that it survived, but the ISRO press release clearly states that the hard landing "terminated its functioning." Secondly, some people have interpreted the description of the Probe's "video imaging system" to mean that it was taking a real time movie of the descent, but, at least as far as I understand it, the video imaging system produced only still images, two of which are shown above.* Video or TV type imaging is appropriate for something like the Probe because the images are relatively low quality but can be transmitted instantly, which you need to do if you know your spacecraft is going to die shortly after it takes the images. [...]

[...] the probe actually returned about 15,000 images over the course of the 25-minute descent. That comes out to 10 frames per second -- slower than regular TV video, but not all that much slower. If that number is correct, it should produce a pretty impressive animation once ISRO has been able to assemble it.

Prakshepak
2008-Nov-16, 09:07 PM
TMC Image 1 (http://isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/imagesfromchandrayaan/tmc-polar-region.jpg)
TMC Image 2 (http://isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/imagesfromchandrayaan/tmc-eq-region.jpg)

PraedSt
2008-Nov-17, 06:03 PM
Space Review article suggesting India be given ISS partnership.

India on the ISS: it starts with a rack. (http://thespacereview.com/article/1253/1)

India’s Chandrayaan-1 moon mission has not only been a scientific and technological success, but it has been an international political winner. By incorporating instruments from Europe and the US as well as their own ones, and doing so in an open way, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has proven itself to be, without question, one of the world’s top space agencies.

What makes sense for the ISS partnership in the short term is to offer India full control of an experimental rack. The agreement with Japan stipulates that a number of the racks in the Kibo module will be controlled by NASA. Since the US has been cutting back on some of the science work it once planned to do on the ISS, it would be logical to offer this space to India, free of charge. ISRO could then take charge of outfitting the rack with experiments devised by Indian scientists.

KaiYeves
2008-Nov-18, 12:41 AM
I second the notion! And China, too!

01101001
2008-Nov-19, 08:45 PM
Planetary Society Weblog: Pictures from the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Impact Probe (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001742/)


[...] the probe actually returned about 15,000 images over the course of the 25-minute descent.

3100, according to Planetary Society Weblog update (http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00001746/).

That's still a bunch. I'm looking forward to the movie.

Bolasanibk
2008-Nov-20, 05:10 AM
Video made from the TMC images:
Clicky (mms://msrv2.wstream.net/isro_archive/TMC01.wmv)


And a composite image made from the frames about video
Clicky (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?act=attach&type=post&id=16548)
(courtsey Phil Stooke@UnmannedSpaceFilght.com (http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=2686&st=210&start=210))

PraedSt
2008-Nov-20, 07:49 AM
Thanks bolasanibk. I just realised that the terrain imaging camera on Chandrayaan has a higher resolution than the one on Selene (5m vs 10m). I was confused by the HDTV the Japanese have.

Bolasanibk
2008-Nov-20, 11:30 AM
No problem PraedSt, Just an excuse to boast of my country's achievements. :whistle:

01101001
2008-Nov-24, 06:51 PM
BA Blog: Chandrayaan-1 is mapping the Moon (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2008/11/24/chandrayaan-1-is-mapping-the-moon/)


[Image: lunar south pole] Chandrayaan-1 has much higher resolution than this, so I’m assuming this image is not shown in full res. Still, it’s very pretty, and I’m happy to see it. I’m hoping the Indian Space Research Organization will release more images soon, as well as some in full resolution. Stay tuned… and as usual, check Emily’s blog, since she usually gets the inside word on these things.

ESA: Chandrayaan-1 starts observations of the Moon (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)

http://www.esa.int/images/tmc-polar-region_M.jpg (http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMMVL5DHNF_index_0.html)

One Skunk Todd
2008-Nov-26, 02:17 PM
CNN is reporting that the orbiter is overheating somewhat:

http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/26/india.moon.probe/index.html

The explanation makes no sense to me:


The increase occurred as the craft, the moon -- which it is orbiting -- and the sun lined up, a phenomenon which Annadurai said was not unexpected and which would likely last until the end of December.

Is it in a polar orbit and now in constant sunlight?

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-26, 02:38 PM
The explanation makes no sense to me:
It took me a while too, but I wonder what the track of the passes are.
All I can think of is that the orbits are in a very slow migration as appears from the sun, which sounds like a full coverage of the moon each month.

cjameshuff
2008-Nov-26, 03:14 PM
It currently goes around the moon every 2 hours, and is only 100 km above the surface, with the moon covering 142 degrees of the sky. When the sun is close to the plane of its orbit, it receives almost an hour of a hot full moon filling most of the sky on one side, and the sun on the other. When the sun is perpendicular to the plane of its orbit, it will always see a half moon, and due to the reflective properties of the moon's regolith, substantially less than half the reflected light.

Also, if the spacecraft has radiators on the antisunward side, they will do much better when facing empty space than when facing the sunlit moon. (given such placement, that's the only time they'll see the moon)

PraedSt
2008-Nov-27, 10:41 AM
Overheating update

ISRO says nothing to worry about: Chandrayaan working normally (http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Chandrayaan_Working_Normally_999.html).

India's unmanned lunar spacecraft Chandrayaan is functioning normally even though there has been a rise in temperature in the moon's atmosphere, an ISRO official said on Wednesday.

"It is a usual phenomena because it is summer on the moon. There is nothing to worry. It will be normal by December," Satish, ISRP spokesperson said.
Does that make sense? Everything ok I hope?

Nicolas
2008-Nov-27, 10:49 AM
Obviously "atmosphere" is striclty speaking not the right term to use for the moon (but I'm rather sure he measn "low lunar orbit"). And I can't really follow what he means with the "seasons", given the craft orbits the moon...I guess we should read that as "the amount of time facing sun vs dark space".

Using "small words" doesn't really help to explain things in this case...

PraedSt
2008-Nov-27, 11:59 AM
I thought it might be 'press speak'? Guess we'll have to wait some more...

Vallkynn
2008-Nov-28, 10:38 AM
Before I read the article I bet myself that an argument would be made that the money spent on the space craft would be better spent on improvements at home. I won. It always amazes me that so many people think that the only important endeavors worth man's time and effort are the acquisition of food, clothing, and shelter.

You must understand that the money spent on space exploration creates jobs, lots of jobs, that's also why it' s expensive, but it provides a way of living for several thousands.

Zvezdichko
2009-Feb-26, 02:04 PM
Looks like we finally have more photos from MIP and we finally have the video (Praise Doug and UMSF!)

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.php?showtopic=2686&st=330

I cropped some images here:

http://www.cosmos.1.bg/portal/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=675:-mip-q-1q-&catid=1&Itemid=2

I'm happy!

mugaliens
2009-Mar-08, 02:08 PM
You must understand that the money spent on space exploration creates jobs, lots of jobs, that's also why it' s expensive, but it provides a way of living for several thousands.

The fallacy of this arguement is that one could take the funds and given them to five times as many people and each would not only have just as much, but they'd be free to work elsewhere on top of that.

"Provides jobs" is a nice political campaign slogan, but it's only an ancilliary benefit. It has no bearing whatsoever on whether or not an endeavor should be taken or not.

sanman
2009-Mar-11, 08:32 AM
The fact is that a country has to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. They have to be able to engage in normal pursuits as well, other than simply trying to recover from poverty. Otherwise, said country would purely stagnate into a navel-gazing how-can-I-fill-my-belly-today mentality.

India has had over a half-century of socialism, where people were told to do just that. It's only recently with economic reforms, allowing people to engage in more entrepreneurial of their choice, that India's economic growth rate has jumped from a mere 2% upto 9.5%. Even in this global recession, India is likely to obtain over 6% growth, which is triple the rate of its socialist welfare state days. Over 1 million people come out of poverty every month because of accelerated economic activity. Socialist welfare state policies never accomplished that, but instead only gave lazy people a fat juicy vein to sink their teeth onto, to suck on and divert more money to themselves.

I think it's great that India now support a broader economic base that provides opportunity to its best and brightest, rather than seeing them go abroad as part of a brain drain.

publiusr
2009-Mar-16, 08:52 PM
I am looking forward to seeing their new GSLV fly soon.

sanman
2009-Mar-19, 05:16 AM
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1327/1

Zvezdichko
2009-Apr-01, 01:59 PM
http://www.isro.org/pslv-c11/photos/moon_images.htm

We finally have new images from Chandrayaan-1 - the Earth, photographed from lunar orbit!!!

ravens_cry
2009-Apr-01, 03:00 PM
Ooh, the old gal looks quite classy in black and white.

galacsi
2009-Apr-01, 05:41 PM
The fact is that a country has to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. They have to be able to engage in normal pursuits as well, other than simply trying to recover from poverty. Otherwise, said country would purely stagnate into a navel-gazing how-can-I-fill-my-belly-today mentality.

India has had over a half-century of socialism, where people were told to do just that. It's only recently with economic reforms, allowing people to engage in more entrepreneurial of their choice, that India's economic growth rate has jumped from a mere 2% upto 9.5%. Even in this global recession, India is likely to obtain over 6% growth, which is triple the rate of its socialist welfare state days. Over 1 million people come out of poverty every month because of accelerated economic activity. Socialist welfare state policies never accomplished that, but instead only gave lazy people a fat juicy vein to sink their teeth onto, to suck on and divert more money to themselves.

I think it's great that India now support a broader economic base that provides opportunity to its best and brightest, rather than seeing them go abroad as part of a brain drain.

I am curious ; why are you speaking about the old Indian system of "SOCIALIST WELFARE STATE" . Sure it was an economy directed by the state , a big bureaucracy , so you can also call it socialist. I will not disput that . But why "WELFARE" ? Have you some evidence that specifically social laws hindered India and their release help the growth or is it just an expression or a beef you have against welfare in general ?

JonClarke
2009-Apr-01, 09:10 PM
The fact is that a country has to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. They have to be able to engage in normal pursuits as well, other than simply trying to recover from poverty. Otherwise, said country would purely stagnate into a navel-gazing how-can-I-fill-my-belly-today mentality.

India has had over a half-century of socialism, where people were told to do just that. It's only recently with economic reforms, allowing people to engage in more entrepreneurial of their choice, that India's economic growth rate has jumped from a mere 2% upto 9.5%. Even in this global recession, India is likely to obtain over 6% growth, which is triple the rate of its socialist welfare state days. Over 1 million people come out of poverty every month because of accelerated economic activity. Socialist welfare state policies never accomplished that, but instead only gave lazy people a fat juicy vein to sink their teeth onto, to suck on and divert more money to themselves.

I think it's great that India now support a broader economic base that provides opportunity to its best and brightest, rather than seeing them go abroad as part of a brain drain.

What's the relevance of this OT (and not even wrong) diatribe?

Zvezdichko
2009-Apr-02, 07:51 PM
Mini-SAR images have been published:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/Mini-RF/multimedia/index.html

JonClarke
2009-Apr-02, 07:57 PM
Yes, there was a lot of interest in these. A whole lot of callibration needs to be done but it does appear that there are some radar bright crater floors in permanantl;y shadowed areas, consistent with buried water ice.

Zvezdichko
2009-Jun-07, 03:25 PM
http://www.isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/ImageMoon.htm

New images here

Zvezdichko
2009-Jun-08, 10:42 AM
http://isro.org/chandrayaan/htmls/ImageMoon.htm

Even more images have been published today!

ToSeek
2009-Aug-03, 09:25 PM
NASA's Moon Mapper Beholds Home (http://www.physorg.com/news168534660.html)


This image of Earth taken from 200 kilometers (124 miles) above the lunar surface was taken by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper, one of two NASA instruments onboard the Indian Space Research Organization's Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft. Australia is visible in the lower center of the image. The image is presented as a false-color composite with oceans a dark blue, clouds white, and vegetation an enhanced green. The image data were acquired on July 22, 2009.

ToSeek
2009-Sep-22, 07:13 PM
Nasa To Reveal New Scientific Findings About The Moon (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/sep/HQ_M09_183_Moon_Science_Findings.html)


NASA will hold a media briefing at 2 p.m. EDT on Thursday, Sept. 24, to discuss new science data from the moon collected during national and international space missions. NASA Television and the agency's Web site will provide live coverage of the briefing from the James E. Webb Memorial Auditorium at NASA Headquarters, 300 E St. SW, in Washington.

The briefing participants are:
- Jim Green, director, Planetary Science Division, Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington
- Carle Pieters, principal investigator, Moon Mineralogy Mapper, Brown University
- Rob Green, project instrument scientist, Moon Mineralogy Mapper, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
- Roger Clark, team member, Cassini spacecraft Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and co-investigator, Moon Mineralogy Mapper, U.S. Geological Survey in Denver
- Jessica Sunshine, deputy principal investigator for NASA’s Deep Impact extended mission and co-investigator for Moon Mineralogy Mapper, Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland

The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was one of the US instruments aboard Chandrayaan. I'm guessing we're talking about strong evidence for water.

01101001
2009-Sep-22, 08:16 PM
I'm guessing we're talking about strong evidence for water.

All right! A fresh new commercial reason to exploit the moon. C'mon, bottled-water people!

Are you still drinking water from dangerous Earth sources? For the utmost in flavor and safety, drink LunaSea brand bottled water. This delicious cometary water comes from the very start of the solar system, was fresh-frozen, and stored thousands of miles from the nearest urine dump. Now sterilized in the Van Allen belt of cleanliness during delivery, for your protection. You can find better, but you can't pay more.

Drink cold, Drink old, Drink safe. You don't have to be crazy to drink LunaSea bottled water.

Van Rijn
2009-Sep-23, 01:05 AM
Nasa To Reveal New Scientific Findings About The Moon (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/sep/HQ_M09_183_Moon_Science_Findings.html)



The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was one of the US instruments aboard Chandrayaan. I'm guessing we're talking about strong evidence for water.

That's what they're thinking it's about over at NASA Watch:

There is A Lot of Water on the Moon (Updated) (http://www.nasawatch.com/archives/2009/09/there_is_a_lot.html)

It would be great if they got good evidence for significant amounts of water. That's been looking like a pretty bleak problem for serious use of the moon. It would certainly put more emphasis back on the Moon in the Moon vs. Mars debate.

Antice
2009-Sep-23, 06:20 AM
All right! A fresh new commercial reason to exploit the moon. C'mon, bottled-water people!

Are you still drinking water from dangerous Earth sources? For the utmost in flavor and safety, drink LunaSea brand bottled water. This delicious cometary water comes from the very start of the solar system, was fresh-frozen, and stored thousands of miles from the nearest urine dump. Now sterilized in the Van Allen belt of cleanliness during delivery, for your protection. You can find better, but you can't pay more.

Drink cold, Drink old, Drink safe. You don't have to be crazy to drink LunaSea bottled water.

this cracked me up good. and it's true too. i know a few people who'd pay good money for that stuff :lol:

Nicolas
2009-Sep-23, 07:30 AM
Could have inserted a play on words with "lunatic" though...

KaiYeves
2009-Sep-23, 11:10 PM
I might drink it just for the coolness factor.

01101001
2009-Sep-24, 05:45 AM
How dry I am...

Universe Today: Yes, There's Water on the Moon (http://www.universetoday.com/2009/09/23/yes-theres-water-on-the-moon/)


When those [solar-wind hydrogen] protons hit the lunar surface with enough force, suspects Taylor, they break apart oxygen bonds in soil materials, and where free oxygen and hydrogen are together, there's a high chance that trace amounts of water will be formed. These traces are thought to be about a quart of water per ton of soil.
"The isotopes of oxygen that exist on the moon are the same as those that exist on Earth, so it was difficult if not impossible to tell the difference between water from the moon and water from Earth," said Taylor. "Since the early soil samples only had trace amounts of water, it was easy to make the mistake of attributing it to contamination."

sanman
2009-Sep-24, 12:58 PM
Water Found on the Moon:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/science/space/article6846639.ece


For those who want to watch, NASA's press conference is scheduled for today (Thursday, Sep 24) @2pm:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html

01101001
2009-Sep-24, 09:34 PM
Water Found on the Moon:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/science/space/article6846639.ece


NASA Press Release: NASA Instruments Reveal Water Molecules on Lunar Surface (http://www.nasa.gov/topics/moonmars/features/moon20090924.html) (09.24.09)

Oh oh. They used blue false color to indicate water-rich minerals. That might upset certain members who think only yellow false color should indicate water. Or was it black? I forget. Eh, to me false is false and is merely an encoding of information, not some trompe-l'oeil attempt at a likeness.

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/388709main_clark_figure_3blue-226.jpg (http://www.nasa.gov/topics/moonmars/features/moon20090924.html)

As tipped by earlier articles:


"We see both water and hydroxyl. While the abundances are not precisely known, as much as 1,000 water molecule parts-per-million could be in the lunar soil. To put that into perspective, if you harvested one ton of the top layer of the moon's surface, you could get as much as 32 ounces of water."

KaiYeves
2009-Sep-24, 11:40 PM
Wa-hoooo!

sanman
2009-Sep-25, 04:47 AM
Some of the press conference:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFsJccXR-iU

Anybody have a link to a more complete video? I'd really like to hear it all.

xCygon
2009-Sep-27, 03:07 AM
great news :)

ToSeek
2009-Oct-01, 09:05 PM
Scientific paper about the Apollo 15 landing site as seen by Chandrayaan here. (http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/sep102009/630.pdf) (NOTE: PDF file)

xCygon
2010-Sep-09, 03:32 AM
Data From Chandrayaan Moon Mission To Go Public


Voluminous scientific data, including rare images of the moon, from India's maiden lunar mission Chandrayaan-1 will be made public by the year-end.

"People will have free access to the huge data obtained from our first moon mission on a web portal that will be launched by this year-end," a senior scientist of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said here.

...


Link: http://www.moondaily.com/reports/Data_From_Chandrayaan_Moon_Mission_To_Go_Public_99 9.html

Zvezdichko
2010-Sep-09, 12:47 PM
As far as I know the data had to be available last year... I wonder why they delayed the release for so long...

kamaz
2010-Sep-09, 02:49 PM
As far as I know the data had to be available last year... I wonder why they delayed the release for so long...

The source says:



The same will be made accessible to the public as the lock-in period for the principal investigators of the mission to analyse will end by December," Krishna said.


But this part is looks very cool:



Detailed mapping of moon's mineralogy and topography will pave way for further research possibilities.

"We will prepare an atlas of the moon with latitude, longitude, colours of areas, ice water, minerals and terrain from the sheets of topography in the data," Krishna added.


I want one :-)

kamaz
2010-Sep-09, 03:00 PM
And here is a piece about the upcoming Chandrayaan-2 mission (http://www.space-travel.com/reports/Chandrayaan_2_Will_Try_Out_New_Ideas_And_Technolog ies_999.html):



MOON DAILY
Chandrayaan-2 Will Try Out New Ideas And Technologies

Chandrayaan-2, the proposed second Indian mission to moon, would undertake "extremely good" experiments and try out new technologies but accommodating foreign payloads on board does not appear to be a possibility at this stage.



Apparently there is a weight problem so some payloads would not fit.



Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft weighs about 2,650 kg at lift-off of which the orbiter weight is about 1,400 kg and lander's about 1,250 kg.

The mission, which will have an orbiter, a lander and a rover, is planned to be launched onboard Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota, in 2013.

While the lander would be provided by Russia, the orbiter and the rover are being built by ISRO.


And at the end of the article we have this:



Underlining the importance of the proposed moon mission, Rao said India has to get into the "business of landers and rovers" sooner or later.

He indicated that the mission would contribute to enhancing knowledge as and when New Delhi decides to undertake a manned mission to moon which ISRO officials maintain could be a possibility in next ten to 15 years.

"May be in future.....manned moon mission.... We don't know when...," he said.


Whoa. Manned mission.

Noclevername
2010-Sep-12, 11:30 AM
Whoa. Manned mission.

That was part of their stated goal from the beginning, IIRC. And the "maybe" and "we don't know when" parts should be highlighted, as they are not encouraging. Kennedy's famous speech set a concrete goal of within one decade, giving a specific deadline to those involved in the project. On the other hand, since India already knows the goal is achievable, have seen how it was done, and have some basic idea of the technologies involved, they have an advantage over the U.S. in the '60s. The disadvantage is that they do not have the Cold War/Space Race fervor or vast economic resources of that time and place either.

Zvezdichko
2010-Sep-12, 11:50 AM
Yes, you are right. India may have experience of sending unmanned craft to the Moon and can crash-land, but they haven't achieved even a simple manned orbital flight.