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Fraser
2006-Sep-26, 03:12 AM
Hot enough for you? A new NASA study has found that global temperatures are nearing their hottest level in more than 12,000 years - since the last glaciers covered large portions of the planet. In fact, global temperatures have been going up approximately 0.2° Celsius (.36° Fahrenheit) per decade for the past 30 years. In fact, global temperatures are now within one degree Celsius of the hottest temperatures measured in the last million years.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/25/warmest-world-in-12000-years/)

JESMKS
2006-Sep-26, 04:59 PM
I'm still wondering if global warming is the cause or the effect of the ice and snow melting at higher latitudes. How many times have we measured the earth's temperature in the last million years?

GOURDHEAD
2006-Sep-27, 02:48 AM
A new NASA study has found that global temperatures are nearing their hottest level in more than 12,000 years - Bah! Humbug!

barryschrader
2006-Sep-27, 03:42 PM
I have read all about Global Warming, seen it on television, researched it on the computer, saw the movie, and had many discussions. In all this activity the best I can find is that the temperature world wide has risen less than .8 of a degree worldwide since 1970 ( when we first obtained accurate satellite measurements) and that is within a statistical + or - and could easily be just a normal cyclic pattern. What is the real reason for all this fuss?

Barry R. Schrader
barryschrader@pobox.com
65 years old by the way.

antoniseb
2006-Sep-27, 05:05 PM
What is the real reason for all this fuss?

Hi Barry, welcome to the BAUT forum.

This forum isn't really a place where we can postulate about sociopolitical motivations if that's what you're asking. I think among scientists, the general fuss has to do with this being a trend, and the consequences when/if the total rise is several degrees.

MrClean
2006-Sep-27, 05:14 PM
What is the real reason for all this fuss?

Money, power, women and fame, same 4 culprits that cause about 98% of every fuss.

nokton
2006-Sep-27, 06:13 PM
Hot enough for you? A new NASA study has found that global temperatures are nearing their hottest level in more than 12,000 years - since the last glaciers covered large portions of the planet. In fact, global temperatures have been going up approximately 0.2° Celsius (.36° Fahrenheit) per decade for the past 30 years. In fact, global temperatures are now within one degree Celsius of the hottest temperatures measured in the last million years.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/25/warmest-world-in-12000-years/).
Fraser, you read history? Eric the Red took his people ( the Vikings ),
and colonised Greenland, so called because at that time in 985 AD, the
polar ice cap was much more reduced than now, and Greenland was
indeed a green and pleasant land, hence its name. Do not speak to me
of 'studies', speak to me of your reading of history. 12,000 years ago
Europe was entering an ice age, Oh my, then it warmed up again 2,000
years later, give me a prayer.
Nokton.

Duane
2006-Sep-28, 03:53 AM
.
Fraser, you read history? Eric the Red took his people ( the Vikings ),
and colonised Greenland, so called because at that time in 985 AD, the
polar ice cap was much more reduced than now, and Greenland was
indeed a green and pleasant land, hence its name. Do not speak to me
of 'studies', speak to me of your reading of history. 12,000 years ago
Europe was entering an ice age, Oh my, then it warmed up again 2,000
years later, give me a prayer.
Nokton.

Not true! Eric the Red called it "greenland" in an effort to attract settlers. The ice cap was not all that different from today, although during that period temperatures were slightly higher, allowing a little bit more land for growing.

Within a very short time the warm trend ednded, and almost all of the original settlements were either abandoned or the people in them all died.

12000 years ago the ice age was ending, not starting.

nokton
2006-Sep-28, 07:28 PM
Not true! Eric the Red called it "greenland" in an effort to attract settlers. The ice cap was not all that different from today, although during that period temperatures were slightly higher, allowing a little bit more land for growing.

Within a very short time the warm trend ednded, and almost all of the original settlements were either abandoned or the people in them all died.

12000 years ago the ice age was ending, not starting..
Duane, yes my typo incorrect about the last ice age, you right.
But as for Eric and Greenland, and the Norse colonies, done my home
work twice over. Eric took his people, with their animals, to a verdant land.
They flourished, the land provided for them and their animals, the days warm. Then the cold came, and as you say, the warm trend ended.
They killed their beloved dogs for meat. They could have survived.
The Inuit told them how to fish and catch seal, the catholic church
prevented it. Why? Better to starve than follow the way of an unbeliever.
They did. Hope you understand Duane.
Nokton.

John Mendenhall
2006-Oct-02, 05:20 PM
Yes, the colonies failed, for whatever reason. And the colony on Newfoundland. And they then missed the greatest prize in recorded history, North America. Think about that, alternative history buffs. Can you speak Nor-wee-gee-ann?

Duane
2006-Oct-06, 06:59 PM
Nokton, that is simply not true. Erin Thorvaldsson named the land he found to the east of Iceland Greenland in an ill-fated attempt to coax Viking settlers there. The colonies managed to eke out a survival for a time, but to say they flourished is a gross exaggeration.