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Fraser
2006-Sep-27, 11:53 PM
This incredible photograph taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows two lakes on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan, attached by a thin channel. The image was taken during Cassini's most recent flyby, when it passed by on September 23, 2006. On Earth, they'd be filled with water, but it's just too cold on Titan; so these lakes contain a mixture of methane and ethane.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/27/twin-lakes-on-titan/)

antoniseb
2006-Sep-28, 11:30 AM
Titan is an interesting place. It is curious how there are so many allegories in its cold chemistry for things that happen here. Yet it would be a mistake to think such comparisons imply deeper comparisons, such as cold life.

hiro
2006-Sep-28, 07:04 PM
how deep are these lakes? It maybe warmer at 100 km from the cold surface and liquid is stability

Grand_Lunar
2006-Sep-29, 03:49 PM
At last, lakes have been found!
Very cool, indeed.

Is there a way that it can be known for certain what the lakes contain?

antoniseb
2006-Sep-29, 03:51 PM
Go snorkling with a chromatograph?

Grand_Lunar
2006-Sep-29, 04:01 PM
I'll have to remember to bring one on a trip there. :D

John Mendenhall
2006-Sep-29, 08:59 PM
Dumb idea du jour: How about if we go get a hold of Titan and drag it close to us? That ought to solve the petroleum problem.

Might create a few, too.

jayfb
2006-Oct-02, 11:18 AM
Dumb idea de jour: How about if we go get a hold of Titan and drag it close to us? That ought to solve the petroleum problem.

Might create a few, too.

Аctually not only it will solve an oil problem or two - we can drag it even a little closer to the sum and make those two lakes two great resorts with great weather. Oh dear, i just started to imagine the possibilities, such a project opens. But first will be getting rid of the specific odours..

greenfeather
2006-Oct-03, 11:09 PM
This incredible photograph taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows two lakes on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan, attached by a thin channel. The image was taken during Cassini's most recent flyby, when it passed by on September 23, 2006. On Earth, they'd be filled with water, but it's just too cold on Titan; so these lakes contain a mixture of methane and ethane.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/09/27/twin-lakes-on-titan/)

What's the freezing point of methane?

greenfeather
2006-Oct-03, 11:17 PM
Dumb idea du jour: How about if we go get a hold of Titan and drag it close to us? That ought to solve the petroleum problem.

Might create a few, too.

While we're dragging planets around, why not solve the real estate problem by smashing Europa into Mars? It will create a new planet with lots of water and more mass/gravity than Mars. Thus it will have enough gravity to keep its water and gather a nice atmosphere. Real estate futures will drop, but construction stocks will go sky high. (literally)

Only question is, what would we call this great new planet? :think:

Grand_Lunar
2006-Oct-03, 11:51 PM
While we're dragging planets around, why not solve the real estate problem by smashing Europa into Mars? It will create a new planet with lots of water and more mass/gravity than Mars. Thus it will have enough gravity to keep its water and gather a nice atmosphere. Real estate futures will drop, but construction stocks will go sky high. (literally)

Only question is, what would we call this great new planet? :think:

Marsopa? Eurars?

John Mendenhall
2006-Oct-05, 05:05 PM
-182.5 C, 90.6 Absolute, per Wiki.

Surface temperature on Titan is around 94 Absolute, so liquid methane can exist. I don't want to go look up the boiling point, but it's at least another 20 degrees Absolute above the 90.6.

greenfeather
2006-Oct-05, 11:40 PM
While we're dragging planets around, why not solve the real estate problem by smashing Europa into Mars?

How easy is it to "drag planets around"? Just wondering.

Casus_belli
2006-Oct-06, 12:12 AM
I think it was titan that 1st got me interested in astronomy all those years ago. All this cassini data is great.

Has anyone read Titan by Stephen Baxter? Looks like a few of his predictions have came true

greenfeather
2006-Oct-06, 12:51 AM
I think it was titan that 1st got me interested in astronomy all those years ago. All this cassini data is great.

Has anyone read Titan by Stephen Baxter? Looks like a few of his predictions have came true

It's Europa that got me interested in astronomy! But Titan's way cool too.
I just bought Baxter's TITAN, so no spoilers please:D

greenfeather
2006-Oct-07, 03:29 AM
This incredible photograph taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft shows two lakes on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan, attached by a thin channel. The image was taken during Cassini's most recent flyby, when it passed by on September 23, 2006. On Earth, they'd be filled with water, but it's just too cold on Titan; so these lakes contain a mixture of methane and ethane.

David Grinspoon wrote an article about the possibility of life on Titan. I probably found it on astrobio.net. He speculates about some of the combustible chemicals (like acetylene) on Titan and how they could possibly be food for microbial life. He says that these compounds are explosive here on Earth in the presence of oxygen, but that in a different type of atmosphere, and with such a cold climate, the reactions might go more slowly, and might be providing "fuel" for metabolism.

I printed the article out, but I could look for a link if anyone wanted.