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View Full Version : What things do you have in your apocolypse larder?



banquo's_bumble_puppy
2006-Sep-29, 11:54 AM
Me: candles, emergency lighting (those little LED stick-up thingies), don't have much else in the way of preparing...probably should get batteries for my radio...other than that I'm ill prepared....

farmerjumperdon
2006-Sep-29, 12:09 PM
Well, since our apocalypse larder doubles as basement storage, it is equipped with quite a few boxes of Christmas lights, lots of kids sized used sports equipment, a dozen or so partial cans of paint, several boxes of old clothes, a couple old lamps, and various seldom used bric-a-brac from the typical family of four.

Since it does triple duty as our storm shelter, there are candles and a radio down there too.

In the aftermath of an apocalypse, we will lead the survivors in a revival of holiday lighting, not to mention being able to outfit both sides in a pick-up game of hockey, softball, or soccer (as long as nobody is bigger than a kids size 6).

Nicolas
2006-Sep-29, 12:28 PM
I'm insured against damage due to aircraft accidents. No further precautions needed; I'm all covered. Nothing can hurt me, as I'm insured! You all burn and die, but not me sir, because I'm insured! You're rushing to your shelter with wind-up radio and expired cookies, but I'm staying right here being my casual self because I'm insured! I laugh in the face of the oncoming aircraft, because I'm insured! MUHAHAHAHA

I'm not prepared. I've got a flashlight in my cell phone, and just maybe the clock radio works on batteries as well, but that's it. I don't have a private basement or other shelter, so I don't really know what else I can do except for maybe getting that battery radio thingy OK.

(It is true that I'm insured against damage due to aircraft accidents (note that this wording is an excuse for the insurer not to pay me in case of a terrorist act), but in my defense it was part of the standard package, so I didn't choose it myself.)

Moose
2006-Sep-29, 01:07 PM
I have a winter kit for my car. Jumper cables, collapsable snow shovel, extra windshield fluid, window scraper, lock de-icer (which is ironic considering it's locked in my trunk), gas line anti-freeze.

That's pretty much the extent of my preparation. We really don't get that much bad weather up here, although I suppose I should be a bit more prepared for long-term power loss. Meh, power goes out for a long time, I pack up myself and the cat and shelter at my folks' house an hour away. They have wood heat.

Essan
2006-Sep-29, 01:14 PM
I've got one of them wind up radio thingies :) Um, but that's it. Well apart form the usual camping gear scattered all over the place. Which includes numerous nearly empty little gaz cylinders for my camping stove. Not that I'll need the camping stove 'cos I'm pretty good at cooking over an open fire. Except I don't have any matched to light it with .....

Swift
2006-Sep-29, 01:41 PM
I don't have an apocolypse larder, if the apocolypse happens, I don't think some water and a flashlight will help that much. ;)

But we do have emergency stores in the basement - water, canned food, flashlights, candles, battery and hand-cranked radio and like Moose I carry a kit in the car, with the addition of a first aid kit and some blankets

captain swoop
2006-Sep-29, 03:26 PM
Apocalypse larder?

I have a pint of milk and half a tub of 'Clover'

I eat at my GFs place. I have more fishing bait than food.

When the Apocalypse comes I will nip to the corner shop, it's always open.

JohnW
2006-Sep-29, 03:32 PM
Earthquake supplies at home: first aid kit at front and back doors and in the car, wind-up radio, bottles of water. For food, I've learned it's important to have a stockpile of something nasty, so we won't be tempted to snack on the emergency supplies when there's nothing in the house. So now we have a couple of piles of Power Bars.

If the Big One hits while I'm at the office, my survival plan is to eat my coworkers. I've got a good sharp knife and some firewood.

Swift
2006-Sep-29, 03:36 PM
If the Big One hits while I'm at the office, my survival plan is to eat my coworkers. I've got a good sharp knife and some firewood.
Well, that explains why you bring in donuts everyday, fattening up the herd.
:naughty:

Doodler
2006-Sep-29, 03:42 PM
My brother owns a pair of katana, and there's a small cache of licensed firearms in the house.

Adequate preparation for any defense or offensive requirements.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Sep-29, 04:34 PM
It'd be easier to list what I don't have,which is a generator & an auxiliary heat source.But I plan to remedy that in the next few weeks.

The only natural disasters we have to deal with are fires (not much I can do about that except put the hose on the roof & hope it helps),flash floods (which we've already had this year,but we live above the floodplain) & massive snowstorms,which could produce power outages,that's why I need the generator.

I keep the dogs fattened up in case of food shortages ;)

Tog
2006-Sep-29, 05:21 PM
A shotgun and a map of the neighborhood:whistle:
Just kidding.
I dont need a map.
[/dan fielding]

Seriously, very little. Flashlight, candles and a lot of knives (and other melee weapons). I live about 400 yards from a river, and the Zoo has been kind enough to pen up a whole bunch of small deer that will come and eat right out of your hand. (Remeber the knives) I also have a small crossbow pistol and know a good duck park.

But then, if it's the apocalypse, I'm also about 2 miles from an Air Force Base, and likely to be wiped out before it will matter in the least.

Ronald Brak
2006-Sep-29, 05:39 PM
Would solar panels and an inverter be better than a gasoline generator? Sure it's quite an investment, but it will eventually pay for itself and requires no fuel which might be hard to come across after a large disaster. I guess you'd just have to be sure the panels are firmly attached to the roof so the apocolypse won't blow them off. The inverter can be installed in your basement and you can keep a spare solar panel down there just in case you lose the ones on your roof.

Lianachan
2006-Sep-29, 05:44 PM
...collapsable snow shovel...

That'd probably be quite useful for fighting off zombies with, you know.

farmerjumperdon
2006-Sep-29, 05:45 PM
I have a winter kit for my car. Jumper cables, collapsable snow shovel, extra windshield fluid, window scraper, lock de-icer (which is ironic considering it's locked in my trunk), gas line anti-freeze.

That's pretty much the extent of my preparation. We really don't get that much bad weather up here, although I suppose I should be a bit more prepared for long-term power loss. Meh, power goes out for a long time, I pack up myself and the cat and shelter at my folks' house an hour away. They have wood heat.

Ah yes, the winter car kit. A must for winter in the northland. Had a scare back in college. It was 50 and sunny when I left Chicago wearing painter's pants, a light sweater, and sneakers. Weather kept deteriorating, and I kept forging ahead. Ended up buried in a snow bank on the side of I94, low on gas and really beginning to worry. Thing is, I did one more stupid thing. A US Mail semi stopped (1st vehicle I'd seen in at least an hour) and offerred a ride but would not pull me out. I refused because I didn't want to leave my stuff behind, including Christmas present haul. Very stupid.

About 2 hours later, and very low on gas, a semi stops and yanks me out with a chain. Very lucky.

My winter kit now includes big boots, big mittens, a shovel, at least a couple big blankets, etc.

JohnD
2006-Sep-29, 05:48 PM
"Apocalypse" ='the lifting of the veil' (Greek), that covers the face of a god (implied).
See Wikipedia:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apocalypse

Did you mean Armageddon?
John

mugaliens
2006-Sep-29, 05:49 PM
My backpack doubles as my larder. I took my cue from Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs," with a few twists.

First, I have a very small pocket Bible.

Second, the lack of shelter can kill you faster than anything else - in the right conditions, in literally minutes. So, I have a bivy sack (emergency shelter if I don't have time to erect the tent), a tent, a sleeping bag, 100% polypro tights and long-sleeved shirt, socks, floppy hat, balaclava that doubles as a cold weather cap, cheap but nearly indestructible UV-A/B sunglasses, a larger, heavy-duty knife which can double as a small axe, about 50' of 550 cord (you can buy it at an Army Surplus store), a micro-net hammock, BullFrog sunscreen, wind/rainproof but breathable hiking pants and jacket, fleece tops and bottoms, long-sleeved shirt, t-shirt, shorts, firestarter kit, poncho (doubles as a windbreak and spare tent), cable saw, and my hiking boots sitting on top.

That takes care of all my needs for shelter from 110 degrees F down to 20 below.

Third, the lack of water is the next thing that will kill you, between hours and a few days, depending on one's condition and the weather, so I have three 1-liter bottles I keep filled at all times, with a couple drops of bleach in them to keep the water pure. I also have a portable osmosis pump/filter with built-in iodine dispenser to replenish my water from pretty much any source.

Fourth, the lack of food, or the presence of bad food, is the next thing that can kill you. Usually, people can go a week or two without eating, but they're pretty weak after that. Nutrition is the most important thing, particularly given the stress of a survival situation, so I carry a three-week supply of GNC Men's Mega-vitamins (ten tablets - I bite 'em in half). However, to provide some carbs and protein, I carry about half a pound of beef jerkey, swapping it out about once a year, and a box of Macaroni and Cheese. I have a micro-light stove, one pot with lid (into which the stove fits), a portable keychain can-opener (weighs about as much as a quarter but can open any can), and a single unbreakable resin spoon. With the knife and 550 cord, I can make bows and arrows, build and set traps for game, etc.

To light my way, I have a featherweight battery-powered LED light, as well as a hand-cranked LED light that's good for about six hours after a couple minutes crank time. The hand-cranked light is primary, and I keep the featherweight as a spare.

Finally, I have a waterproof notebook and two good, but lightweight pens in which I can make comments.

Total weight: 32 lbs.

If I make a base camp of sorts, I can usually get a two or three-day pack down to less than 20 lbs.

For a winter car kit, the only thing I add is a shovel, cell phone, and a bag of cat litter.

JohnD
2006-Sep-29, 06:23 PM
And after three weeks?
What sort of emergency are you planning for?
The End Of Civilisation As We Know It?
28 Days Later?
Or a long hike in the woods?

I'm a great admirer of Ray Mears, I even have one of his fire lighters, but if you watch his programmes, you'll notice, no guns. Ray seems to have no problem with them, or with people who have good reason to carry them - he works with military bods - but he never has one, even in the most hostile territory. I know who I would rather be marooned with.

John

Swift
2006-Sep-29, 06:51 PM
Originally Posted by Moose
...collapsable snow shovel...That'd probably be quite useful for fighting off zombies with, you know.
Or at least Calvin's snowmen monsters.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Sep-29, 06:59 PM
Would solar panels and an inverter be better than a gasoline generator? Sure it's quite an investment, but it will eventually pay for itself and requires no fuel which might be hard to come across after a large disaster. I guess you'd just have to be sure the panels are firmly attached to the roof so the apocolypse won't blow them off. The inverter can be installed in your basement and you can keep a spare solar panel down there just in case you lose the ones on your roof.

A generator's portable,solar panels ain't.If I had to bug out (unlikely where I live) I could throw it in the back of my truck.

Gillianren
2006-Sep-29, 07:44 PM
The apocalypse worries me not. The problem is that I can't really afford to put together an earthquake supply kit. For one, I'm out of money pretty much period for another two days, and we may or may not have enough of certain things to provide meals until Sunday. If we had earthquake supplies, they'd get raided at the end of the month every month.

What's more, I really don't have anywhere to keep it, given the amount of water I have to store to take care of two people and a cat. Frankly, in a major disaster, we'll probably end up filtering water from the duck pond out back. Also, there are ducks in it. Yum!

Ronald Brak
2006-Sep-29, 08:22 PM
A generator's portable,solar panels ain't.If I had to bug out (unlikely where I live) I could throw it in the back of my truck.

I think solar panels would be more portable than a generator, depending on the system of course. I know the military use portable solar power panels to run laptops, etc off and I assume they wouldn't do that if generators were superior. Then there's the fact that you don't have to lug fuel around.

The expense might still be a bit high for solar, however.

Doodler
2006-Sep-29, 10:01 PM
I think solar panels would be more portable than a generator, depending on the system of course. I know the military use portable solar power panels to run laptops, etc off and I assume they wouldn't do that if generators were superior. Then there's the fact that you don't have to lug fuel around.

The expense might still be a bit high for solar, however.

Nah, its coming down nicely for a home unit. A guy I worked with put one on his cabin so he could watch football games without needing a buttload of battery power.

JohnW
2006-Sep-29, 10:32 PM
All this discussion reminds me that I really need to add a small alt-azimuth mounted refractor and a star atlas to my earthquake kit. Those skies are going to be seriously dark.

Doodler
2006-Sep-29, 10:33 PM
All this discussion reminds me that I really need to add a small alt-azimuth mounted refractor and a star atlas to my earthquake kit. Those skies are going to be seriously dark.

Here types a man who BELONGS in this forum. :lol:

Chuck
2006-Sep-29, 10:55 PM
Motorcycle, fuel, guns, ammo, and body armor would be best. The roving gangs from all the post apocalypse movies won't be the losers in real life.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Sep-29, 11:11 PM
I think solar panels would be more portable than a generator, depending on the system of course. I know the military use portable solar power panels to run laptops, etc off and I assume they wouldn't do that if generators were superior. Then there's the fact that you don't have to lug fuel around.

The expense might still be a bit high for solar, however.

The military also has duece & a half trucks & lotsa soldiers to carry the stuff & set it up!
And they don't use solar to power things like AC & big light arrays,it just doesn't generate the wattage.

I might look into the solar if the price comes down & efficiency goes up,but for now I can buy a 6500 watt diesel for less than $3500.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Sep-29, 11:45 PM
Motorcycle, fuel, guns, ammo, and body armor would be best. The roving gangs from all the post apocalypse movies won't be the losers in real life.

Another Mad Max fan! :D

If you're gonna have guns you should learn to reload too.That always bothered me about those movies,they couldn't make black powder?

Jeff Root
2006-Sep-30, 03:48 AM
I'm one of three people in North America who didn't have or buy
a flashlight and fresh batteries before the end of 1999. Previous
flashlights all corroded, fell apart, stopped working, or mysteriously
vanished years earlier. Okay, I did have a wimpy sort of flashlight
that is really the light on my pocket microscope.

Two days ago I bought the first radio I've ever purchased in
my entire life, and the first portable I've had in my possession
in several decades. I bought it at a dollar store that I happened
to be walking by. It only does FM, so the apocalypse would
have to be a pretty impressive one to interrupt the regular
programming. Oh -- never mind. I found NPR. No numbers on
the $1 radio, just a "scan" button. Weirdly, the radio has a
built-in flashlight. The radio is smaller than almost all the
flashlights I've ever owned.

This radio came with the first "ear buds" I've ever used. Are
they really supposed to fit in a human ear? Or are they just
instruments of torture?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

HenrikOlsen
2006-Sep-30, 06:48 AM
My kit?
Axe and multitool, I can make pretty much anything else I'll need, the rest is frosting.
Such as the longbow (selfmade, thus selfreplaceable) which will continue to work after other peoples guns have been fired empty and the portable forge(also selfmade) that could quite probably make me a reasonable living post-apocalypse if we get back to a barter echonomy.

Maksutov
2006-Sep-30, 08:09 AM
Me: candles, emergency lighting (those little LED stick-up thingies), don't have much else in the way of preparing...probably should get batteries for my radio...other than that I'm ill prepared....Nothing, since the "apocalypse" is a pigment of human imagination.

Meanwhile, for real natural disasters, I have the various canned goods my late fiancée bought and stored, as well as lots of bottled water (most important), and fresh batteries for the flashlights and radio.

For man-made disasters I also have my handgun and rifle.

Ronald Brak
2006-Sep-30, 09:21 PM
I've lived in a country that has more natural disasters than any other developed country, and I'd have to say that a gun would be a pretty useless item. Disasters seem to be times when people come together. Yes, looting does sometimes happen, but it's usually very limited and shooting people can just take up vital police and medical services which are typically stretched to the limit in these situations.

Frantic Freddie
2006-Oct-01, 01:08 AM
I've lived in a country that has more natural disasters than any other developed country, and I'd have to say that a gun would be a pretty useless item. Disasters seem to be times when people come together. Yes, looting does sometimes happen, but it's usually very limited and shooting people can just take up vital police and medical services which are typically stretched to the limit in these situations.

Not at all,the Korean & Vietnamese shopowners in LA that stood their ground with weapons didn't have their stores looted & burned.

In a survival situation,all you need is a good .22 rifle to feed yourself,you can take a deer with one (yes,I know it's not legal,but if it's really hit the fan nobody's gonna be worryin' about tags & legal calibers).

But I'll agree that except against looters,guns aren't really an important part of the equation unless you're takin' game to eat & even then you're better off usin' a bow or traps,you don't want anyone else to know you've got food.

Knowin' how to hunt & fish is very handy,I have trout & elk in my freezer & I can smoke it (smoked trout is very tasty) or turn it into jerky.

If you want to have guns,there's 3 that you should have:
Rifle: a .22's OK,a 30-30's better,but any rifle's good.
Shotgun: 12 gauge is best,but too much for some people,20 gauge is easier to handle,the diminutive .410 is best left to experienced shooters.
Handgun:Again,.22 & up is fine,but the .357 revolver is the most versatile & durable & easy to operate handgun.

Gillianren
2006-Oct-01, 01:57 AM
Given my eye-hand coordination, it would be pretty well worthless for me to have a gun to shoot meat, and I don't think I could shoot a person, so it's just as well that I don't have one.

Maksutov
2006-Oct-01, 05:13 AM
Bank Teller #1: Does this look like "gub" or "gun"?
Bank Teller #2: Gun. See? But what does "abt" mean?
Virgil: It's "act". A-C-T. Act natural. Please put fifty thousand dollars into this bag and act natural.
Bank Teller #1: Oh, I see. This is a holdup? from Take the Money and Run.

captain swoop
2006-Oct-02, 11:20 AM
I don't worry about much happening, I suppose a band of rogue Sheep could wander into town from the Moors or one of the Farm Boys might get a bit drunk on Friday night.

Roy Batty
2006-Oct-02, 02:24 PM
Doesn't anyone else keep apocalypses in their apocalypse larder? :)

JohnW
2006-Oct-02, 09:45 PM
Doesn't anyone else keep apocalypses in their apocalypse larder? :)
I don't keep them at all. I have my Apocalypse Now.