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greenfeather
2006-Oct-01, 02:27 PM
Hi folks,
I was reading my son's WIRED Magazine and there was an article about the virtual world Second Life. Well, I may be a little older than the usual computer geek (55 years old to be exact) but I do kind of like creating fantasy worlds. I am a science fiction writer after all! And I do like trying to create planets in Bryce. AND I can't wait to try the game SPORE when it comes out!

So, I want to know if anyone here has tried Second Life and is it cool or is it a rip-off. I would like to be able to just look around without actually buying stuff (I really don't need a set of male genitals, :lol: ). And I don't really have a million hours to get wrapped up in it because I do have a Real Life (translation: a boring job where I'm on the computer all day.)

What do folks think about Second Life? And also, I'm kind of leery about putting out credit card info over the net. Amazon.com owns my identity and soul, but I'm cautious about other things.

Doodler
2006-Oct-01, 05:52 PM
I've been in a science fiction game akin to Second Life called Entropia Universe.

It can get pretty expensive pretty quickly. I dropped something like $700 in three months in Entropia. I don't regret it, but there's no way I could have kept that pace up.

As far as account security, you can't swipe your plastic anywhere without risking compromise, so why live in fear of what could theoretically be inevitable?

antoniseb
2006-Oct-01, 05:59 PM
I've played Second Life for a while. I didn't do much with it, and haven't done it in a couple months, because I'm pretty busy these days.

To me the potentially interesting aspect was writing code to make objects in the Second Life universe that were interesting or valuable. I made a few clumsy things, and understand what it would take to make better things.

I had numerous IM-like conversations with interesting poeple about things that they had built or done. I had a few short-term jobs to pick up some money. In the end, though, it wasn't enough to hold my interest.

Argos
2006-Oct-02, 02:30 PM
Yeah, Im very much looking forward to building things to make bucks outta frivolity (I know you BAUT people are not the kind ;)) of its players. The ancient economic notion of 'value' gains a whole new meaning with this kind of game.

Im starting to agree that virual reality will be the mans last invention.

My advice: instead of a second life, try pursuing a real life.

bRainDance
2006-Oct-02, 02:46 PM
I've been in a science fiction game akin to Second Life called Entropia Universe.

It can get pretty expensive pretty quickly. I dropped something like $700 in three months in Entropia. I don't regret it, but there's no way I could have kept that pace up.

As far as account security, you can't swipe your plastic anywhere without risking compromise, so why live in fear of what could theoretically be inevitable?

You spent HOW much?

On WHAT?

J H Crist i need to set up one of those on a server somewhere

Can you just clarify what you swaid is true, and if i may probe ... WHY?

You earn 700 bucks in real life so you can spend it in virtual life ... typing?

Because lets face it, it isnt real is it?

It's just typing

700 shmackeroooos fookin ell!

If its some sort of game your talking about sir ... i would venture to offer that YOU were the one being played

Swift
2006-Oct-02, 02:50 PM
bRainDance,
Welcome to BAUT. You might want to check on the FAQs and the rules. This is considered a family friendly board and bad language (even if misspelled ;) ) is considered a no-no.

Doodler
2006-Oct-02, 03:27 PM
Well, lemme see....

At a rate of one real world dollar to ten PED (Project Entropia Dollars), that netted me an ingame apartment, furniture, two sets of armor, three weapons, a pet, a taming whip, a few sets of clothes, repair costs (decay rates on use will make your heart break) and a buttload of ammunition (given the rate of fire, lack of accuracy at the lower levels, I could drop ten bucks worth of ammo in about an hour or so.)

My only problem with the game, given the nature of MMOs I'm interested in, was the lack of community. Because it was a pegged economy with a set real world value, and an economy designed from the outset to be weighed in favor of the money sinks, it was a very cold game.

Normally, if I meet a new player in an MMO I think has potential, or for some reason I happen to like, I've never had a problem dumping some of my old gear on them to give'em a leg up. You will never see that in Entropia, because instead of being a purely virtual economy, its a linked real world economy, and every item represents a real dollar value.

MUCH more mercenary, and not something I stayed interested in very long.

Doodler
2006-Oct-02, 06:34 PM
Just an FYI, for the new guy when he returns, that's actually rather pacing myself, considering my real world spending capabilities.

I was out about two weeks ago and dropped that much in just over an hour.

I work hard, I play REAL hard. ;)

farmerjumperdon
2006-Oct-02, 07:08 PM
Here you there. Fun and exotic hobbies ain't cheap.

Doodler
2006-Oct-02, 07:15 PM
Here you there. Fun and exotic hobbies ain't cheap.

Exactly.

Most of the hardcore Entropia players were investment level types who sank thousands into their initial game, and built themselves rapidly to a profitable level. It is possible with Entropia to make decent money, but you've got to invest accordingly. For a 2-3 hour a night gamer looking to blow off steam, Entropia's just not the game for you.

greenfeather
2006-Oct-02, 09:04 PM
My advice: instead of a second life, try pursuing a real life.

I've been trying that, but it hasn't been working. Why do you think I have time to look at things like this board, and games like that? :( Obviously I have no social life.:boohoo:

soylentgreen
2006-Oct-03, 03:24 AM
Just an FYI, for the new guy when he returns, that's actually rather pacing myself, considering my real world spending capabilities.

I was out about two weeks ago and dropped that much in just over an hour.

I work hard, I play REAL hard. ;)

In the context of this discussion, don't you mean that you play virtually hard? Or maybe eHard? ;)

Having some absurd amount of money to burn doesn't really make buying 'virtual' houses any more sane. I'd imagine your local soup kitchen(and your karma) could have benefitted much more from that easy-to-part-with $700 than some imaginary world community. :think:

Ronald Brak
2006-Oct-03, 05:57 AM
Well I agree that $700 does seem excessive for a game, but I am of the opinion that any money spent by anyone in a way that doesn't directly benefit me is a waste.

greenfeather
2006-Oct-03, 10:21 PM
Well I agree that $700 does seem excessive for a game, but I am of the opinion that any money spent by anyone in a way that doesn't directly benefit me is a waste.

Think how much SCIENCE FICTION you could buy for $700!!!

Now the question is... which would occupy more time...reading all those books? or playing $700 worth of Game?

Doodler
2006-Oct-03, 11:08 PM
In the context of this discussion, don't you mean that you play virtually hard? Or maybe eHard? ;)

Having some absurd amount of money to burn doesn't really make buying 'virtual' houses any more sane. I'd imagine your local soup kitchen(and your karma) could have benefitted much more from that easy-to-part-with $700 than some imaginary world community. :think:

Hard as in, I take my indulgences seriously. :)

I don't do charity. Ever. Non-negotiable. Given what I've been through to get where I am, bad karma lost its intimidation value ages ago.

Doodler
2006-Oct-03, 11:09 PM
Think how much SCIENCE FICTION you could buy for $700!!!

Now the question is... which would occupy more time...reading all those books? or playing $700 worth of Game?

I still drop a decent amount of money on books when I see something I want bad enough. I've got a few titles I'm still after.