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JESMKS
2006-Oct-03, 10:08 PM
Is there a relationship between the orientation of a galaxy and it's direction of movement in the Universe? Do galaxies move in a direction that is at a right angle from their axis of rotation or is the direction random? If there is a preferred direction of movement, wouldn't the speed of a galaxy movement away from earth be related to its axis of rotation with respect to earth?

antoniseb
2006-Oct-03, 10:22 PM
Is there a relationship between the orientation of a galaxy and it's direction of movement in the Universe?

What do you mean by direction of movement in the Universe?

There IS a relationship between a spiral galaxy's axis of rotation and the orientation of the super-custer it is a member of.

Lurker
2006-Oct-04, 12:05 AM
Is there a relationship between the orientation of a galaxy and it's direction of movement in the Universe? Do galaxies move in a direction that is at a right angle from their axis of rotation or is the direction random? If there is a preferred direction of movement, wouldn't the speed of a galaxy movement away from earth be related to its axis of rotation with respect to earth?

What do you mean by direction of movement in the Universe?

There IS a relationship between a spiral galaxy's axis of rotation and the orientation of the super-custer it is a member of.
antoniseb --

I think the idea is that if all galaxies were not moving with respect to the universe, then the expansion would result in all galaxies to be seen as moving farther away. Since we see Andromeda moving toward us, this would suggest that movement with respect to the universe...

I am not sure that helps...

JESMKS
2006-Oct-04, 02:51 AM
Telescopes show galaxies with almost an infinite difference in orientation relative to earth. Some as pinwheels and some a flat discs. Is their direction of movement controlled by their orientation? Do they all follow some path that is related to their orientation?

Jeff Root
2006-Oct-04, 06:21 AM
JESMKS,

What do you mean by "their direction of movement"?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Kaptain K
2006-Oct-04, 06:34 AM
Galaxies are so far away that the only motion we can detect is radial motion. Any transverse component of galactic motion is so small that we cannot detect it.

jlhredshift
2006-Oct-04, 03:02 PM
Galaxies are so far away that the only motion we can detect is radial motion. Any transverse component of galactic motion is so small that we cannot detect it.

This is the correct answer.

See how simple it is.