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Mister Earl
2006-Oct-11, 03:35 PM
Read something a while ago, just remembered some of it...
Heard that if you were in space, that you could survive stepping out into that vacuum (as long as you let the air out of your lungs before-hand, so as not to damage your lungs!) for quite a period of time. You wouldn't freeze, because there's nothing that can carry away the heat inside of you, excepting of course actually radiating away your heat, which would take quite some time. You'd feel the water in your mouth boil away, and after a minute or more you would pass out, but if brought back into an atmosphere (slowly!) you would have no permanent damage.

Interesting! Anyone here able to expand on this? I'm very interested in this topic... I'm suprised there's no extreme sport based on this.

01101001
2006-Oct-11, 05:00 PM
I'm very interested in this topic...

See topics:
Human Body in Vacuum (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=39511)
Walking on mars with or without spacesuit (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36151)
space walking (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=27333)
How long of Survival (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=25068)
person in vacuum (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=12538)
Is a space suit needed on Mars? (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=8667)
Dead Bodies in Space (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=3130)

astromark
2006-Oct-11, 06:43 PM
1 atmospheric pressure is what you have. The sudden reduction of air pressure to 0. Would kill you almost instantly. No extreme sport. Nil survivability. Like deep sea divers are aware,. Your blood would boil in your arteries and brain rendering you unconscious. Death would be unavoidable. The links supplied by 01101001 tell the whole story well.

Van Rijn
2006-Oct-11, 07:35 PM
1 atmospheric pressure is what you have. The sudden reduction of air pressure to 0. Would kill you almost instantly. No extreme sport. Nil survivability. Like deep sea divers are aware,. Your blood would boil in your arteries and brain rendering you unconscious. Death would be unavoidable. The links supplied by 01101001 tell the whole story well.

It depends on what you mean by "almost instantly." You could stay conscious for 10-20 seconds and probably survive a minute or two of exposure, if returned to atmosphere. Also, oxygen deprivation would be the reason for loss of consciousness.

grant hutchison
2006-Oct-11, 07:42 PM
You also wouldn't see boiling of arterial blood until you were nearly dead: the pressure gradient maintained across arterial walls is higher than the boiling point of water in vacuum. Gas would appear in your veins, and would flow into the heart. The combination of "air in the pump" and very low oxygen partial pressures would lead to the heart failing, blood pressure falling, and as a pretty terminal event the appearance of gas bubbles in arteries.
01101001's links (and the external links they provide) give quite a detailed discussion.

Grant Hutchison