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andy912
2006-Oct-16, 02:03 PM
Hi,

Me and a few friends have started to regually go night fishing down the local beach whenever possible, and we have thought about purchasing either a set of binoclars of a basic telescope.

Or to just use at the bottom of the garden

Quick question, If we setup the telescope, point it up to space and take a peek will we see planets. Clusters, and other amazing sights? or do you need to be in a certian area? at a certian time?

http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/public/M31.jpg < looks amazing!

Be lucky

Thanks

antoniseb
2006-Oct-16, 02:11 PM
Hi Andy912, welcome to the BAUT forum.

Personally I like having a nice big pair of binoculars (I use 11x80s, but bigger might be better). With these I cannot see details on planets, or some other amazing sights that appear in images and photographs taken with larger instruments, but I think you'd be hard pressed to find something you'd like taking to the beach that gives you a satisfying view of something like that.

The best images are photographs taken with light collected over a long time. Your eyes will never get the same view, no matter what you own. Big binoculars are nice because they provide good light gathering power, and a nice depth of field. They can also be used for day-time sighteeing.

andy912
2006-Oct-16, 02:19 PM
Hi,

Thanks for the quick and detailed reply:)

Be lucky

aurora
2006-Oct-16, 03:37 PM
You might want to browse through messages in the "Astronomical Observing, Equipment and Accessories" section of this forum.

Especially look for messages where people were asking about buying binos or a telescope. There's lots of good info and many links to introductory articles provided in the responses.

JohnW
2006-Oct-16, 06:31 PM
Me and a few friends have started to regually go night fishing down the local beach whenever possible, and we have thought about purchasing either a set of binoclars of a basic telescope.
If you're trying to keep costs down, you'll see a lot more with cheap binoculars than a cheap telescope. This depends on your definition of "cheap", though.

Quick question, If we setup the telescope, point it up to space and take a peek will we see planets. Clusters, and other amazing sights? or do you need to be in a certian area? at a certian time?
You might see something impressive if you just point the scope or binoculars up at random, but your chances will be improved if you use a map. If you're just starting out, try a planisphere - this is a map with a centre section which rotates. If you dial in the date and time, it will show you what's up there tonight. Once you get the hang of it, you'll also need an atlas and/or software.

"Certain area"? The darker the better, but I do most of my observing from my urban back yard, and while galaxies and nebulae are hard work (but doable), the Moon, planets, double stars and most clusters are pretty easy.

"Certain time"? Unless you're planning to look at the Moon, you're better off when it's below the horizon, unless it's very new or old.

andy912
2006-Oct-16, 06:48 PM
Hi JohnW,

Thanks for reply.

Will let you guys know what I decide to purchase:)

Be lucky

Edit: Guess I would be looking to spend around &#163;400 - &#163;450

Squashed
2006-Oct-17, 12:26 PM
Hi,

Me and a few friends have started to regually go night fishing down the local beach whenever possible, and we have thought about purchasing either a set of binoclars of a basic telescope.

Or to just use at the bottom of the garden

Quick question, If we setup the telescope, point it up to space and take a peek will we see planets. Clusters, and other amazing sights? or do you need to be in a certian area? at a certian time?

http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/public/M31.jpg < looks amazing!

Be lucky

Thanks

Here is a good site (http://www.skyviewcafe.com/skyview.php) to figure out what is up there.

Type in your location and then you can cycle through the times to see how objects move through your night sky and where they will be at certain times of the night. Have fun.

clop
2006-Oct-17, 01:00 PM
Hi JohnW,

Thanks for reply.

Will let you guys know what I decide to purchase:)

Be lucky

Edit: Guess I would be looking to spend around 400 - 450

That is one heck of a lot of money!

My binoculars are second-hand and cost me 200 quid from an optics shop in Harrogate. They're 7x50 Docter Optic and they are fantastic. The shop let me take 3 sets of binoculars home to try out before I made my choice. One good tip for choosing between binoculars of the same power/aperture is to hold them side by side with the objective lenses up at the sky, and examine the exit pupils from about a foot away. You can make an easy comparison between size and brightness (generally the brighter the better, but the quality of the optics must also be taken into account). Try splitting a good double star system with them, like Alcor/Mizar et al. Binoculars are what really got me into astronomy. You can see tons of stuff with binoculars and they're so portable and easy to hold. Telescopes just add an extra level of annoyance and unless you know the sky quite well it's hard to point them in the right direction. Where exactly do you live?

clop

Gillianren
2006-Oct-18, 02:54 AM
Heck, I spent $20 American on my binoculars! (They were on sale.)

crosscountry
2006-Oct-18, 07:31 AM
My first purchase was a 6 in Dobsonian telescope. I think you can get one for about 250 USD. Proably 200 Pounds shipped to you.


I learned so much with that and some star software that I eventually moved up. Now my friends and family come to me when they have questions about stars and the like. Often I don't know and come here, but you get the point.

A telescope has really changed my life for the better.

I recommend a portable one. The beach is a perfect place to learn being that there is less light and pollution.

somthing like this is perfect for starters and cheap too.

http://telescopes.com/products/celestron-starhopper-6-inch-dobsonian-25830.html

I have one similar from www.telescope.com

also I bought http://www.starrynight.com/new_snbyx.html

to teach me. A good planisphere is best, but the program really helps you pinpoint the items.

You can see the planets, star clusters, and many nebulae with this combination. It is definitly worth the expense.

Good luck.

Kiwi
2006-Oct-18, 07:56 AM
Have a look here for info about making a bean bag
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=278881#post278881
if you intend getting binoculars. The most important thing is holding them steady to see things like Jupiter's four biggest moons. Hand-held, I can't usually see them -- cradled rigidly in a bean bag, no trouble.

A bean bag is a cheap, easy-to-make accessory you will never regret having.

I have a pair of Nikon 8x23 waterproof binoculars that cost over NZ$400 and are, naturally, good quality, but I've also had a lot of use and enjoyment out of a pair of second hand Glory 8x50s I bought for $20.