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View Full Version : "Army Strong" to replace "An Army of One"



sarongsong
2006-Oct-17, 11:44 PM
Homer?!
2006
...The slogan, unveiled earlier this week and to be launched Nov. 9, is part of a $200 million-a-year contract the Army has with a civilian advertising agency... Military.com (http://www.military.com/spouse/fs/0,,fs_Biank_101206,00.html?ESRC=family.nl)

soylentgreen
2006-Oct-18, 01:43 AM
I'm betting they could use that 200 million to better advantage by getting better bodyarmor for the grunts and more schooling for Pentagon war planners.

Ronald Brak
2006-Oct-18, 01:49 AM
They were probably attracting a lot of loners who were really annoyed that they had to share barracks with other people and do teamwork with that "An Army of one" slogan.

Now it looks like they are trying to attract people with minimal grammar skills.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Oct-18, 02:34 AM
Hm. Compare that to the Canadian Forces' new advertising campaign (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_6vK_JSSTo).

Gillianren
2006-Oct-18, 02:58 AM
They were probably attracting a lot of loners who were really annoyed that they had to share barracks with other people and do teamwork with that "An Army of one" slogan.

Like my boyfriend, for example. (He's in Iraq now, but due to a paperwork snafu, he's now back on deskwork; he told me a very exciting story about stealing his sergeant's printer ink.)

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 07:18 AM
I like Army Strong much better than [/i]Army of One[/i].

Nicolas
2006-Oct-18, 07:25 AM
If you listen closely and look at the waveforms of the original broadcast, you can hear the apparently missing words. In reality, they did say "an Army that's Strong". But the Southern accent swallows hese words. But they really did say them!

-Neil Army Strong-

Maksutov
2006-Oct-18, 07:30 AM
I'm betting they could use that 200 million to better advantage by getting better bodyarmor for the grunts and more schooling for Pentagon war planners.Or even better, declaring victory, then paying for the transportation to get our young people out of harm's way and back home.

If they're hoping to evoke memories of Jack Armstrong, the All-American Bo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Armstrong_the_All_American_Boy)y, then they're really out of touch with the current "cannon-fodder" (unfortunately) generation.

BTW, in standard English, the adjective normally precedes the noun it modifies. Is the U.S Army going poetic on us? Or French?

:doh:

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 07:58 AM
BTW, in standard English, the adjective normally precedes the noun it modifies. Is the U.S Army going poetic on us?

Army in this case is an adverb.

Maksutov
2006-Oct-18, 08:10 AM
Army in this case is an adverb.Really.

How would it be used in a sentence?

I have an Army Strong force to defeat you.?

Pretty awkward sounding, as with "An Army of One" and "It's a Man's Life in the Modern Army (http://orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/army.htm)".

Maksutov
2006-Oct-18, 08:11 AM
If you listen closely and look at the waveforms of the original broadcast, you can hear the apparently missing words. In reality, they did say "an Army that's Strong". But the Southern accent swallows hese words. But they really did say them!

-Neil Army Strong-Wonderful! :lol: :clap:

All I can say is, "A!"

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 08:20 AM
Advertising slogans really are not meant to be used in a sentence - that's why they are slogans. I like it because it's vague enough to be of utility for advertisers while still reflecting Army Core Values.

Tog
2006-Oct-18, 08:33 AM
I guess I took it to mean Army Strong, in the same way trucks are Ford Tough, or clothes are Downy Soft.

The Army of One slogan really bugged me though. The very first thing that happens is you are more or less stripped of your individuality, then get it drilled into you that you are part of a team. I constantly hear things like, "You're not Rambo", and "You're not John Wayne". That last one was normally in regard to the helmet chin strap not being fastened, but still... It was all about teamwork, and acting as a unit.

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 08:43 AM
I guess I took it to mean Army Strong, in the same way trucks are Ford Tough, or clothes are Downy Soft.

Right - that's the way it's meant - What kind of strong?


The Army of One slogan really bugged me though. The very first thing that happens is you are more or less stripped of your individuality, then get it drilled into you that you are part of a team. I constantly hear things like, "You're not Rambo", and "You're not John Wayne".

Yup - Army of One is a good way to appeal to teen macho but has the downside of not reflecting Army Core Values and I think does not appeal to parents well enough. The biggest selling point for the parents of a prospective recruit is personal development.


That last one was normally in regard to the helmet chin strap not being astened, but still...

You know, I've never really noticed that but it would bug me as well.

Maksutov
2006-Oct-18, 08:48 AM
I guess I took it to mean Army Strong, in the same way trucks are Ford Tough, or clothes are Downy Soft.

The Army of One slogan really bugged me though. The very first thing that happens is you are more or less stripped of your individuality, then get it drilled into you that you are part of a team. I constantly hear things like, "You're not Rambo", and "You're not John Wayne". That last one was normally in regard to the helmet chin strap not being fastened, but still... It was all about teamwork, and acting as a unit.In other words, an Army of one DI (Drill Instructor).

http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/boese/a010.gif

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 08:51 AM
In other words, an Army of one DI (Drill Instructor).

Drill Sergeant.

You didn't join the Marines, maggot! :)

Maksutov
2006-Oct-18, 09:05 AM
Drill Sergeant.

You didn't join the Marines, maggot! :)Yeah, jarhead.

I guess they considered me to be too much a bubblehead to be instructed by an E-5. Got a Senior Chief Petty Officer (E-8) which included a Marine DI (E-7)! Poor guy...

Funny, the Joint Chiefs consider all of them to be DIs.

Dive, dive...

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/566/iconwink6tn.gif

(Note: Slang kept at minimum for civilian comprehension.)

Gillianren
2006-Oct-18, 09:38 AM
Tell me about it. I'd ask my boyfriend what he does in the Army, and he'd give his rank. (No, I don't remember--a specialist, but I don't know the level.) I'd ask him again, and he'd give me an impenetrable description. (My dad was Air Force, but he retired ~4 months before I was born.)

Finally, his mom, overhearing yet another version of this conversation, said, "He's Radar." This, I got--I've been watching M*A*S*H since infancy.

Nicolas
2006-Oct-18, 10:55 AM
"Army Strong" could be the name of an old, female comic hero :).

>>Her brother<< (http://www.starland.com/sus/2002/images/020531TomStrong01.jpg)

NEOWatcher
2006-Oct-18, 02:37 PM
Hm. Compare that to the Canadian Forces' new advertising campaign (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_6vK_JSSTo).

Obviously made to invoke an emotion rather than make a statement. Either that, or the advertising agency is more interested in art.

Judging from the narration, their slogan is "_____________".

Trebuchet
2006-Oct-18, 07:18 PM
Hm. Compare that to the Canadian Forces' new advertising campaign (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_6vK_JSSTo).

Those are really quite good! Not that I'm anxious to join up, mind you.

Doodler
2006-Oct-18, 08:08 PM
Really.

How would it be used in a sentence?

I have an Army Strong force to defeat you.?

Pretty awkward sounding, as with "An Army of One" and "It's a Man's Life in the Modern Army (http://orangecow.org/pythonet/sketches/army.htm)".


I believe its not intended as such. Being a slogan, its more in line with the old "Chevy Tough" advertising campaign.

Gillianren
2006-Oct-18, 08:11 PM
It's true; it's an adverb. How strong is he? Army strong.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Oct-18, 10:41 PM
Obviously made to invoke an emotion rather than make a statement. Either that, or the advertising agency is more interested in art.

Darn right. And it evokes an emotional response better than the US ads that I've seen.


Judging from the narration, their slogan is "_____________".

Not true. The slogan is "Fight fear. Fight distress. Fight Chaos. Fight with the Canadian Forces."


Those are really quite good! Not that I'm anxious to join up, mind you.

Yep. They are good. And they cost about half of what the new US Army slogan cost.

swansont
2006-Oct-18, 10:44 PM
Tell me about it. I'd ask my boyfriend what he does in the Army, and he'd give his rank. (No, I don't remember--a specialist, but I don't know the level.) I'd ask him again, and he'd give me an impenetrable description. (My dad was Air Force, but he retired ~4 months before I was born.)

Finally, his mom, overhearing yet another version of this conversation, said, "He's Radar." This, I got--I've been watching M*A*S*H since infancy.


Does he wish you a "birthday, comma, happy, comma, one each?"

Cylinder
2006-Oct-18, 10:46 PM
And they cost about half of what the new US Army slogan cost.

Comparing cost is probably not the best measure, since the US Army campaign has to reach a significantly larger pool of targets.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Oct-18, 10:50 PM
Shoot. Re-reading, I see that the cost was for a contract, not for development costs. Now that I think of it, the same is probably true of the Canadian ads. Good catch.

Doodler
2006-Oct-18, 11:21 PM
Not true. The slogan is "Fight fear. Fight distress. Fight Chaos. Fight with the Canadian Forces."

They might want to send that one back to the drawing board. Makes me want to call my shrink more than join the military...

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Oct-18, 11:58 PM
I don't know. It seems to work. They're trying to emphasize their goals. Better than the old ads that pretty much said "Join the army. It's a job, at least."

Damien Evans
2006-Oct-19, 12:47 AM
in australia i don't remember advertising the army as such, but i see a lot of ads on tv advertising the army reserve using the slogan: "army reserve: the part time of your life."

Gillianren
2006-Oct-19, 04:03 AM
Does he wish you a "birthday, comma, happy, comma, one each?"

Actually, he tends to say, "It's your what now?" He's bad at dates. He doesn't reliably remember his own birthday, much less mine.

Besides, he's only Reserves, so (until the last few months, obviously) he hasn't had to do Army stuff every day.

Serenitude
2006-Oct-19, 04:36 AM
I still like the old Steven Wright quote:


Join the Army. Meet interesting people. And kill them.

PS: Not making a political statement. I did Army time in the 101st. I just love that quote :dance:

Frying Tiger
2006-Oct-19, 05:00 AM
Hmm, I like the slogan better if you say it like "Hulk SMASH!"

"Army STRONG!" AARRRRRGH!

That works for me. I always felt "An Army of One" seemed like a comment on troop strength levels... (grin)

Cylinder
2006-Oct-19, 05:40 AM
I just love that quote :dance:

"I love Army life. You get to travel to foreign countries, meet interesting people - and kill them."

I think that's how the old chestnut went - or it's at least how I learned it. That ranks up there with I don't know but I've been told... There's probably a hundred variations of that particular cadence, very few of which do not violate Rule 3.

Serenitude
2006-Oct-19, 05:51 AM
I can't, ATM, think of ANY cadence we ran to that wouldn't break that rule...:whistle:

Although I'm lead to understand that cadences have been very much tamed since I was but a young soldier... you know, back when shots were loaded individually in the muskets... :doh:

Tog
2006-Oct-19, 06:50 AM
I can't, ATM, think of ANY cadence we ran to that wouldn't break that rule...:whistle:

Although I'm lead to understand that cadences have been very much tamed since I was but a young soldier... you know, back when shots were loaded individually in the muskets... :doh:

Oh yes... In 1988 I can state for a fact that Drill Sergeants were not allowed to swear or touch a trainee in an agressive manner. Patton would have gotten an article 15 for slapping that guy.

The PC rules were so strictly enforced that they were silly. I was in a mixed gender company, with one platoon of females. We were told numerous times that: "They are no different, do not treat them any differently than you would a male, do not act any differently around them, do not talk to them, do not look at them, do not touch them." To me this seemed somewhat contradictory.

We arrived in Alabama in late August THe first three days are not actually training, but processing. We had one female (who I will, of course, call Jill) who was almsot unnaturally thin. When her pistol belt was sized properly the DS was able to fasten it around his thigh. We had a male who was just as thin and nearly a foot taller. (He will be Bob) Getting that many people through the chow line for three meals per day would be a task. Doing he same thing for dozens of other companies in at the same time was a bit more difficult. The procedure on our end was simple enough. Stand in 90 degree heat with 90% humidity for an hour or two. By stand, I mean Parade Rest; feet shoulder width apart, weight even, knees bent slightly, hands behind the back, eyes fixed, body immobile. To move forward when the time came, you came to attention, stepped forward as far as possible then went back to parade rest.

Well, becasue I arrived on a Thursday, day tree of my processing happened on the fifth day I was there. Five days of this in total. On day two, we hear a body fall in the lunch line. Thoe of us nearby turn to see Jill, crumpled on the ground, out cold. A few of us moved her way to see what we could do and the Drill Sergeant went nuts. The phrase I remember the most was, "No no no! Stop! Get away! Don't touch her!" They helped her inside, had us stand a bit more relaxed, explained the bending the knees thing again, and life went on.

A couple of days later, at lunch, I hear a little wimper sound and a body fall. Those nearby turn to see Bob, crumpled on the ground, out cold. We all seemed to remember the events of two days ago, and turn back to the front, as we were instructed the first time. We then get a lecture about NOT helping when a fellow trainee goes down. We get in trouble for trying to help the female, and we get in trouble for not helping the male, but we are not to treat either gender any different.:wall:

BTW, I did have a great deal of respect for a lot of the females I trained with. By and large, the requirements they had to meet were the same as the males. Both genders had their whiners.

Edit: Oh yeah, and all of our cadences were PG except that one the 8 of coming back from the PX, sang at a whisper, lead by a drill sergeant that said if anyone outside of this group heard us, we'd be doing pushup until HIS article 15 was over :)

Serenitude
2006-Oct-19, 06:58 AM
HAHA!! That's a great story! At that rate, they must be singing "Kumbayah" about now...

Nicolas
2006-Oct-19, 07:31 AM
We were told numerous times that: "They are no different, do not treat them any differently than you would a male, do not act any differently around them

And still they wouldn't like you slapping them with the tip of a wet towel under the shower, nor turning their bed over when they snore. :)

NEOWatcher
2006-Oct-19, 12:05 PM
Judging from the narration, their slogan is "_____________". Not true. The slogan is "Fight fear. Fight distress. Fight Chaos. Fight with the Canadian Forces."
That was a comment on the narration, not the slogan. I was scratching my head wondering what the images that I was looking at were. I guess it was more out of curiosity than anything else.

The Supreme Canuck
2006-Oct-19, 12:33 PM
Might have been the cruddy resolution. No narration, but the missions were described in small text at the bottom of the screen. Could have been done better.

mugaliens
2006-Oct-20, 06:34 PM
Gee, Mom, I wanna go home!

Gillianren
2006-Oct-20, 08:16 PM
So does Graham. He's so bored (he's in an office now, as I said) that he actually spent money on Stick It.

swansont
2006-Oct-20, 09:25 PM
Besides, he's only Reserves, so (until the last few months, obviously) he hasn't had to do Army stuff every day.

Actually, that doesn't necessarily follow. I was in the reserves (navy) and spent almost five years on active duty. Depends on the terms of the contract you sign.

Being in the reserves meant I did not have to resign my commission, and have the navy accept it, to remove myself from active duty once my term was up. And being in the nuclear field meant I couldn't be called up later, since once you're out, they don't (or didn't, back then) let you back in. That was reassuring during Desert Storm. Not that physics instructors were in any great demand...

Anyway, I always thought of the "Army of One" along the lines of "OK, there's a conflict in Fictionalia. Charlie, we'll drop you in so you can take care of it."

sarongsong
2006-Oct-20, 11:01 PM
Gee, Mom, I wanna go home!"Not until you max out your credit cards, sonny-boy!"
October 20, 2006
High levels of debt are costing thousands of military personnel their security clearances and preventing them from serving critical overseas duty...The Pentagon contends that fiscal problems can distract deployed personnel from their duties and make them vulnerable to bribery and treason... San Diego Union-Tribune (http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontrib/20061020/news_1n20mildebt.html)

Maksutov
2006-Oct-20, 11:12 PM
Anyone who's spent some time at SUBASE* knows about Hospital Hill. About the highest point on the base.

Every Memorial Day we had a 5 miler from sea level to the top of the hill and back again. The race was open to the general public.

Thus the cadence near sea level went:

Look around you
What'd'ya see?

Bunch of civilians
Runnin' with me!

Really think they're
Doin' swell?

Wait 'til they get to
Hospital Hill!

Note: the "i" in "Hill" was sounded out as if it were an "e", in order to rhyme with "swell".

*The Naval Submarine Base New London (actually in Groton, CT)

Gillianren
2006-Oct-21, 09:54 PM
Actually, that doesn't necessarily follow. I was in the reserves (navy) and spent almost five years on active duty. Depends on the terms of the contract you sign.

He did active duty at the beginning of his service, but it was basically standing around airports with an empty gun, trying to look like a convincing deterrent to terrorism. Since he's 6'6", and was in very good shape, I suspect he did fairly well and would even if he hadn't had the gun.


Being in the reserves meant I did not have to resign my commission, and have the navy accept it, to remove myself from active duty once my term was up. And being in the nuclear field meant I couldn't be called up later, since once you're out, they don't (or didn't, back then) let you back in. That was reassuring during Desert Storm. Not that physics instructors were in any great demand...

I still don't understand the red tape that put him back to being a clerk; he didn't explain it very well. However, he's not an officer, so no commission to be resigned.


Anyway, I always thought of the "Army of One" along the lines of "OK, there's a conflict in Fictionalia. Charlie, we'll drop you in so you can take care of it."

Yeah, whatever happened to "be all that you can be"?

Actually, the first college information packet I got in high school was for West Point. I laughed 'til I cried, then called my best friend so she could do the same. (I wouldn't survive West Point even if they'd let me in, which they wouldn't've.)