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Fraser
2006-Nov-03, 01:55 AM
The Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the National Radio Astronomical Observatory teamed up to produce this composite image of galaxy cluster MS0735.6+7421, located about 2.5 billion light-years from Earth. The cluster contains dozens of galaxies held together by gravity. A truly supermassive black hole lurks at the heart of this cluster, containing more than a billion solar masses. The red areas are twin jets of material streaming away from the black hole.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/11/02/super-supermassive-black-hole/)

antoniseb
2006-Nov-03, 11:27 AM
The X-ray portion of the image shows enormous holes or cavities in the gas, each roughly 640 light-years in diameter — nearly seven times the diameter of the Milky Way.
As I noted in blob's thread in the astronomy section, the Science writer for the Chandra team transposed 640,000 light years into 640 light years. The Milky Way galaxy can be measured in lots of ways, but there is no way to say it is only 90 light years in diameter.

That being said, this is a fascinating object, and looks like it was the location of an SMBH merger a few million years ago, as the jets of material seem to have changed direction suddenly.

Don Alexander
2006-Nov-03, 02:46 PM
Fraser wrote:

The cluster contains dozens of galaxies held together by galaxy.

Anyone else notice something?

Alex

Nereid
2006-Nov-03, 02:56 PM
If the cluster gas is disrupted so much, by the jets, then modelling it as isothermal spheres (or whatever simple models are used), for analyses of microwave observations in terms of the SZE, will yield somewhat noisy results, won't it?

Or maybe even make such an exercise close to useless?

Of course, very good x-rays and radio data may be used to create a good map of the (integrated) electron density and temperature, across the cluster, which could be used as input to 'deconvolving' the microwave data, to extract the SZE signal .... or could it?

ranger2061
2006-Nov-03, 03:00 PM
Wow, this is one ugly picture. I can't relate to blobs of blue and streaks of red. I'd like to see the Hubble (optical) portion of this galaxy cluster. I don't see anything that looks like a galaxy here. It would be nice to have the individual pictures from each telescope to compare them with the composite. Its great science though. Keep up the good work!

Ron

Fraser
2006-Nov-03, 03:03 PM
Fraser wrote:

The cluster contains dozens of galaxies held together by galaxy.

Anyone else notice something?

Alex

Ah... fixed.

Fraser
2006-Nov-03, 03:04 PM
Wow, this is one ugly picture. I can't relate to blobs of blue and streaks of red. I'd like to see the Hubble (optical) portion of this galaxy cluster. I don't see anything that looks like a galaxy here. It would be nice to have the individual pictures from each telescope to compare them with the composite. Its great science though. Keep up the good work!

Ron

Here you go, this page has all the separate images in it.
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2006/51/image/

ranger2061
2006-Nov-03, 03:35 PM
Thanks Fraser, that was quick.

The optical portion wasn't so beautiful, but it put this image into perspective. That supermassive black hole must be really huge. Is it one of the largest known?

Ron

Ps: Your podcasts are excellent!

Aknauta
2006-Nov-03, 06:12 PM
I'm wondering about the energy consumed by a black hole. Does it gradually dissipate? Can a black hole reach a state where it's influence has reached an area where no more material can be collected, thus it begins to shrink due to the lack of material? Do the laws of our material universe operate in black holes?

eachus
2006-Nov-03, 06:15 PM
The separated images make it clear that there is a large elliptical galaxy around the super-massive black hole. From the radio and x-ray images, it seems possible that this galaxy was created from the merger of two other galaxies fairly recently (in astronomical terms).

I have to wonder if LIGO could have seen the gravity waves as the two central black holes spiraled around each other prior to merging. I assume of course, that the merger occurred before any of the modern gravity wave detectors were operational. I also have to wonder if the final merger of the two black holes could have created a gravity wave signal seen by Weber...

Hamilcar
2006-Nov-04, 12:19 AM
A truly supermassive black hole lurks at the heart of this cluster, containing more than a billion solar masses.

Still not bigger than M87, which is (IIRC) 3 x 10^9 M_sun

RUF
2006-Nov-04, 04:10 AM
Can a black hole reach a state where it's influence has reached an area where no more material can be collected, thus it begins to shrink due to the lack of material? Do the laws of our material universe operate in black holes?

After sucking down large amounts of material, a Black Hole will "Burp", blowing the accreated material away from the BH. It may blow that material so far from the black hole that it can no longer gobble up material. The black hole is then said to be "dormant."

Hamilcar
2006-Nov-04, 02:49 PM
After sucking down large amounts of material, a Black Hole will "Burp", blowing the accreated material away from the BH. It may blow that material so far from the black hole that it can no longer gobble up material. The black hole is then said to be "dormant."

SMBHs can also self-limit their growth via feedback. A low level of accretion can potentially stop any further supply of significant amounts of fuel.