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Fraser
2006-Dec-02, 02:30 AM
NASA researchers have discovered organic material inside a meteorite the recently fell in Canada's Tagish Lake. The meteorite is especially valuable because scientists collected it shortly after it crashed in 2000, ensuring it wasn't contaminated by local bacteria. The meteorite seems to contain many small hollow organic globules, which probably formed in the cold molecular cloud of gas and dust that gave birth to the Solar System. Meteorites like this have been falling to Earth for billions of years, and probably seeded the early planet with organic material.

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2006/12/01/organic-material-found-in-an-ancient-meteorite/)

George
2006-Dec-03, 03:28 AM
I have read about meteorites in blue ice in Antarctica. Is this an example of blue ice?

Zarn
2006-Dec-03, 11:18 AM
"Organic material" is an hollow expression - every compound that contains Carbon may have this title. If we're talking something more complex - say, a known protein - this is a different thing altogether.

antoniseb
2006-Dec-03, 01:55 PM
"Organic material" is an hollow expression - every compound that contains Carbon may have this title. If we're talking something more complex - say, a known protein - this is a different thing altogether.

True. Since the meteorite was Carbonaceous, you'd expect it to have some carbon containing (organic) molecules, but if this object were found to contain proteins, they'd have said protein, and not organic material. They certainly didn't mean to imply 'material from the organs for animals'. IIRC, we've detected amino acids in meteorites before, so I'm not certain what really sets this observation apart. I imagine that there is something, but the press release did not make clear what it was.

BTW, welcome to the BAUT forum.

Blob
2006-Dec-03, 04:18 PM
Hum,
see also http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=41521

Latitude:59.704100N; Longitude: -134.207477W

Jerry
2006-Dec-04, 03:26 PM
It is clear, from the body of the article, that the organics found inside the Tagish Lake meteorite contain nitrogen as well as carbon. This moves us a baby-step closer to the possibility that life on earth had a celestial origin.

There is an important distinction left out of the article: The term organic does not indicate 'living' or of biological origin. Organic means carbon-containing - this is kind of a bad chemistry misnomer.

antoniseb
2006-Dec-04, 04:14 PM
I imagine that there is something, but the press release did not make clear what it was.

I've seen another article about this. The thing that is new here seems to be that this study has a much increased certainty that the Carbon & Nitrogen bearing molecules are not Earthly contamination.

Blob
2006-Dec-04, 06:44 PM
Hum,
while a small amount of earthly contamination was possible, the fact that the fragments were recovered from frozen ice soon after the meteorite fall, and the proportions of initial tests on the isotope ratios, excluded high contamination.
For all intents the meteorite is a pristine sample of the early solar system.

John Mendenhall
2006-Dec-08, 07:54 PM
Hum,
see also http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=41521

Latitude:59.704100°N; Longitude: -134.207477°W

Blob, I give up. What is supposed to be at these coordinates? Is W really negative? Or should it be E? I can't find anything with Google Earth. Transposing for S doesn't help either.

01101001
2006-Dec-08, 08:18 PM
Blob, I give up. What is supposed to be at these coordinates? Is W really negative? Or should it be E? I can't find anything with Google Earth. Transposing for S doesn't help either.

Isn't Latitude:59.704100°N; Longitude: 134.207477°W (http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=59.704100%C2%B0n+134.207477%C2%B0w&ie=UTF8&z=9&ll=59.721792,-134.206238&spn=0.625947,2.727356&om=1) within Tagish Lake, site of meteor recovery described in original article?

Blob
2006-Dec-08, 09:33 PM
Hum,
it should be 134.207477W, the location of Tagish Lake. The original meteorite was considerably larger and most of it still remain spread over the area.

Sticks
2006-Dec-09, 06:56 AM
This sounds very close to panspermia which seems like a big cop out on the question of how life gets started. You find out maybe that the evidence suggests that the conditions on the early Earth would have been hostile to life starting, so you import it from outside.

All this does is move the problem somewhere else