PDA

View Full Version : if earth caught the comet mcnaught in its atmosphere



suntrack2
2007-Jan-25, 05:33 PM
so what will happen, will be the 1. sudden rains starts, 2. the tides will errupt from the oceans of the earth, 3. ice falling experience can be seen, 4. jerk to earth, 5. earth will twist in 2 parts, 6. dust and ice particles will finish the environment surrounded with earth, 7. immidiate global warming will be follow ?

we know that it is not going to fall on the earth, but what will be the probable answers for the above 7 questions!!

(imagination) :)

Squashed
2007-Jan-25, 05:55 PM
so what will happen, will be the 1. sudden rains starts, 2. the tides will errupt from the oceans of the earth, 3. ice falling experience can be seen, 4. jerk to earth, 5. earth will twist in 2 parts, 6. dust and ice particles will finish the environment surrounded with earth, 7. immidiate global warming will be follow ?

we know that it is not going to fall on the earth, but what will be the probable answers for the above 7 questions!!

(imagination) :)

I haven't kept up with this comet: how big (massive) is the comet?

01101001
2007-Jan-25, 06:22 PM
More red rain in Kerala! (Not.)


so what will happen, will be the 1. sudden rains starts, 2. the tides will errupt from the oceans of the earth, 3. ice falling experience can be seen, 4. jerk to earth, 5. earth will twist in 2 parts, 6. dust and ice particles will finish the environment surrounded with earth, 7. immidiate global warming will be follow ?

Earth couldn't catch a comet in its atmosphere, not in the usual meanings of "catch", any more than it could catch a child's ball tossed into the air.

A comet could pass through the Earth's atmosphere. But it would be a fantastically rare event. And scary! Passing though the atmosphere, it could either emerge and continue its voyage, its orbit around the sun, or it could strike this planet -- disaster for us. It could not remain in the atmosphere: it's too big, it's traveling too fast, and the atmosphere is too thin. Tiny bits of it -- comets this near the sun are outgassing and sloughing off particles -- being light, might hang in the atmosphere a time.

Now I think you have to describe what kind of interaction you meant by "caught", I think, before we can conjecture on particular effects.

tusenfem
2007-Jan-25, 06:27 PM
How about, most of it burns up in the Earth's magnetosphere, atmosphere, and perhaps a big chunk may land on the roof of your house?

1. No rain, although there is a lot of water in the comet, it will evaporate due to the rubbing off the atmosphere (see entry of space shuttle).
2. No tides, I would estimate that the gravitational pull of the moon is orders of magnitude greater than that comet would have.
3. No falling ice, see no rain.
4. The Earth is soooo much heavier than the comet that there will be only a "jerk" when that last piece drops down on your roof.
5. Earth will definitely not "twist in two parts" whatever that may be.
6. If a really big part would impact the Earth, it may cause lots of dust in the atmosphere (see Big Impact).
7. Global warming, or sooner global cooling like in a nuclear winter, only if the cometary rest would be really big.

I put my bet on the partly burning up, and then in the end a "Tunguska like" event.

astromark
2007-Jan-25, 06:47 PM
Things you need to know. . . . Mass, Density, Velocity, and orbital path.
Like any asteroid this comet would need to be on a Earth crossing track. If you consider that this object has come from the outer solar system and has gone inside the orbit of Mercury It is a risk. However that risk in this case is very small. Yes there are two opportunities for a Comet Earth collision. In this comets track we need not worry. It missed., and on its outward trip will again. It will not be back for The next generation. . . over 100 years.
If this comet were to collide with Earth it would cause local devastation. Its velocity and mass would tear it to bits as it slammed into our atmosphere. The remaining core would slam into The planet and a crater would be born. Very messy if it was near to where you live. But not this one, this time. :)

Kaptain K
2007-Jan-25, 07:42 PM
FWIW, the Earth passed through the tail of comet Halley in 1910. Hucksters made a killing selling "anti-cyanide" pills, even though the total HCN the Earth collected from the comet was only a few grams!

Spaceman Spiff
2007-Jan-26, 02:51 AM
We don't have to guess.

Go here (http://www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects/), and put in some numbers that might match that of a typical comet.
Let's drop it into Northern Canada 1000 km to the north of me (not that it really matters too much)
Density 500 kg/m^3 (they're fluffy)
Diameter 10,000 m
impact velocity 50 km/s
angle of impact ah, pick 45 degrees
drop into crystalline rock, as found in Canada (not that it matters all that much)
hit the "calculate effects" (sheesh) button and watch what comes back. And that's only the beginning (of the end...)

Ok, now try this "game (http://www.barringercrater.com/game/)"; choose the text only version. Then choose from 4 rocky/iron meteoroid diameters and drop it near 1 of 4 of your big city favorites, and read the "news report" that comes back.

Then go here (http://www.sandia.gov/video/CometSim.htm) to see an animation of a computer simulation of a comet strike. More info about the simulation can be found here (http://www.sandia.gov/media/comethit.htm), although several of the links are disconnected.

astromark
2007-Jan-26, 07:05 AM
This excellent link ( above ) Is lots of very interesting gloom, Doomsday stuff. The fact is that in order to be hit we need to be very unlucky. It is possible for a comet to graze the Earth. Bounce off the atmosphere, No damage. It is Highly probable that at some time in the future the Earth will be targeted and struck by a significantly damaging impact. This is like predicting earthquakes. We have no reason to worry at this time. Be comforted by the knowledge that as our ability to see and track these objects improves so to does the chances we can deflect same. I sleep well. :)

suntrack2
2007-Jan-26, 05:08 PM
01101001 quote: > Now I think you have to describe what kind of interaction you meant by "caught", I think, before we can conjecture on particular effects.

well, I have used this word "caught" with the immidiate meaning of "falling in the atmosphere".(my english is little bit poor)

:)
sunil

01101001
2007-Jan-26, 05:21 PM
well, I have used this word "caught" with the immidiate meaning of "falling in the atmosphere".(my english is little bit poor)

That's OK.

So this comet -- well, McNaught won't; it never came anywhere near Earth -- a hypothetical comet, will not be caught in Earth's atmosphere, but will pass through the atmosphere and smash into the planet.

Well, that would be an extremely rare and very bad thing. Its effect would depend a lot on its size, and some on its particular path, some on the part of the planet it hits. I think the scenario possibilities have been touched on, above.

Spaceman Spiff
2007-Jan-27, 07:15 PM
This excellent link ( above ) Is lots of very interesting gloom, Doomsday stuff. The fact is that in order to be hit we need to be very unlucky. It is possible for a comet to graze the Earth. Bounce off the atmosphere, No damage. It is Highly probable that at some time in the future the Earth will be targeted and struck by a significantly damaging impact. This is like predicting earthquakes. We have no reason to worry at this time. Be comforted by the knowledge that as our ability to see and track these objects improves so to does the chances we can deflect same. I sleep well. :)

I sleep well, too. My post was not to scare anyone, but merely to demonstrate that we do not have to guess about what might happen due to such "encounters", however unlikely. And just as an aside, a comet "ricocheting" off our atmosphere is unlikely to result in "no damage" to those beneath the path. I haven't done any of the computer simulations, but if a boulder ablating and breaking up at high altitude as it encounters our atmosphere at a shallow angle produces a spectacular bollide event, a 10 km comet might provide just a tad too much excitement. ;)