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Fraser
2007-Feb-07, 01:54 AM
One of the great outstanding questions in science is known as the "theory of everything". What underlying laws of physics explain the forces we see in nature? ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/02/06/heres-a-way-to-look-for-extra-dimensions/)

trinitree88
2007-Feb-07, 11:47 PM
Fraser. Of course there is at least one unified theory curled up inside the Standard Model of particle physics that has made predictions of physical effects seen at six separate major independent labs, peer reviewed and published a few dozen times....without invoking either DM, DE, strings, phlogiston, caloric or polywater. All options ought to be considered.

John Mendenhall
2007-Feb-08, 08:23 PM
Fraser. Of course there is at least one unified theory curled up inside the Standard Model of particle physics that has made predictions of physical effects seen at six separate major independent labs, peer reviewed and published a few dozen times....without invoking either DM, DE, strings, phlogiston, caloric or polywater. All options ought to be considered.

What?

Thanks, J.M.

bigsplit
2007-Feb-10, 10:58 PM
I still do not see anything in their illustration that could possible be another dimension. I keep hearing that they are curled up, or very small. This does not qualify it for a different dimension. There are 3 spacial dimensions, anything else and we are just fooling ourselves. Why don't they use some other word besides dimensions. Just because it is small or curled up does not mean its an extra dimension, maybe a smaller scale would do. These are serious physicist toiling over such things and it is pure science fiction. x, y and z is all that is needed and all these dimensions are just distractions.

Blob
2007-Feb-13, 03:14 PM
Hum,

General relativity in five dimensions gave theoreticians five additional quantities to manipulate beyond the 10 needed to adequately define the gravitational field. Kaluza and Klein noticed that four of the five extra quantities could be identified with the four components needed to define the electromagnetic field. In fact, to the delight of Kaluza and Klein, these four quantities obeyed the same types of equations as those derived by Maxwell in the late 1800s for electromagnetic radiationl Although this was a promising start, the approach never really caught on and was soon buried by the onrush of theoretical work on the quantum theory of electromagnetic force.

Read more (http://www.astronomycafe.net/cosm/dimens.html)


In 1919, Polish mathematician Theodor Kaluza proposed that the existence of a fourth spatial dimension might allow the linking of general relativity and electromagnetic theory.

Read more (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/elegant/dimensions.html)


Lisa Randall, one of the world's most influential physicists, explains why we need more than three dimensions to understand the cosmos

Read more (http://randall.physics.harvard.edu/RandallCV/Telegraph.pdf) (39kb, PDF)

jamini
2007-Feb-13, 03:22 PM
I still do not see anything in their illustration that could possible be another dimension. I keep hearing that they are curled up, or very small. This does not qualify it for a different dimension. There are 3 spacial dimensions, anything else and we are just fooling ourselves. Why don't they use some other word besides dimensions. Just because it is small or curled up does not mean its an extra dimension, maybe a smaller scale would do. These are serious physicist toiling over such things and it is pure science fiction. x, y and z is all that is needed and all these dimensions are just distractions.
Pure science fiction? You must have a deep intuitive understanding of quantum physics and an explanation for why quantum gravity is so weak compared to the other forces of nature; as well as why no one as of yet has been able to unify the laws of quantim physics with classical physics. Would you be so kind as to educate us?

magma
2007-Feb-13, 05:45 PM
Does an 'anti'-universe qualify as another dimension. ;)

Blob
2007-Feb-13, 09:42 PM
Hum,
in the same way as we can equate an iceberg to a luxury liner.