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View Full Version : Is the sun getting hotter?



briandunning
2007-Feb-07, 06:08 PM
I am preparing a Skeptoid podcast episode about chemtrails, and one of the claims I have to deal with is that the sun has been gradually getting warmer. Before rejecting this at face value, I wanted to double check with the experts and see if there might possibly be some kind of solar cycle that we may be on the upswing of. Maybe he was talking about the 11-year solar flare cycle? Is there any other cycle we might be on?

korjik
2007-Feb-07, 07:09 PM
Depends on what scale you are talking about. At the scale of millions of years, the sun is getting slowly hotter as the increased He content of the core forces it to heat up. On the scale of years, the sun does show some changes, but they are generally pretty small

neilzero
2007-Feb-11, 01:03 PM
There are some clues that the Sun has not gotten warmer by even 10% the past 4 billion years, unless that was compensated by Earth moving farther from the sun and/or a long term decrease in green house gases.
The analysis is complicated by the geographic poles moving a fraction of one degree per thousand years, and the tilt of the Earth's axis changing at a slow rate. While some experts speak authoritively, my guess is we don't know. Neil

satori
2007-Feb-11, 08:25 PM
Brian,
the "global warming deniers" (some of them) like the idea of a slowly hottening sun, as it takes the onous of guild away from CO2! This heating up is disputed and can't be any big in the "best" case. As neilzero pointed out, the solar wattage seems to be nearely constant even over looong stretches of time. We are graced!!!
But I know from another thread, that you are into catastrophes. So even with our friendly patron overhead, something unplesant could happen...
Inside of the sun you have a fusion reactor in full swing, pumping out energy in the form of photons. These photons scatter all about and need on their erratic pathes in the order of a million years to reach the convection zone, where they or their heat energy input get transported by a convective lift system all the way up to the surface. Note that you have a similar process going on right under our feet...
NOW you know, that their might be instabilities in this flow.Plumes of magmatic rocks can build, burning their way all the way up thru the colder layers above , giving subsequently rise to volcanos.
That were the "plumes". But you have also super plumes and associated a kind of volcanic activity that is of a totaly different order then your normal Mnt.Vesuvius let's say.
Now what I wanted to conway is, that there might(!) be instabilities in the heat (and matter) conveying belts in the sun as well !Not that I had ever heard of!!! though...
I would think that the sun research is a well advanced science but none the less not complete .Should there be a Super Plume Analogon on the Sun and would it be rare and would it be short it might have gone unnoticed until now, even if we have geological records and other "suns" of the "Sol type" to compare with...
So perhaps I should google a little or start a new thread.

closetgeek
2007-Feb-16, 03:18 PM
That is just shortsighted. Whether or not the sun is getting hotter is completely independent of the CO2 issue. Sorry but it is like speeding while you are driving drunk. You know you are heading for a disaster anyway...

I have to mention this because I couldn't help but giggle at how it sounded. I am fully aware that extremely bad winters, in no way, diminishes the threat of global warming, I just thought it was a funny play on words for a headline.

"Global Warming meeting delayed as a result of snowstorm"


Brian,
the "global warming deniers" (some of them) like the idea of a slowly hottening sun, as it takes the onous of guild away from CO2! This heating up is disputed and can't be any big in the "best" case. As neilzero pointed out, the solar wattage seems to be nearely constant even over looong stretches of time. We are graced!!!
But I know from another thread, that you are into catastrophes. So even with our friendly patron overhead, something unplesant could happen...
Inside of the sun you have a fusion reactor in full swing, pumping out energy in the form of photons. These photons scatter all about and need on their erratic pathes in the order of a million years to reach the convection zone, where they or their heat energy input get transported by a convective lift system all the way up to the surface. Note that you have a similar process going on right under our feet...
NOW you know, that their might be instabilities in this flow.Plumes of magmatic rocks can build, burning their way all the way up thru the colder layers above , giving subsequently rise to volcanos.
That were the "plumes". But you have also super plumes and associated a kind of volcanic activity that is of a totaly different order then your normal Mnt.Vesuvius let's say.
Now what I wanted to conway is, that there might(!) be instabilities in the heat (and matter) conveying belts in the sun as well !Not that I had ever heard of!!! though...
I would think that the sun research is a well advanced science but none the less not complete .Should there be a Super Plume Analogon on the Sun and would it be rare and would it be short it might have gone unnoticed until now, even if we have geological records and other "suns" of the "Sol type" to compare with...
So perhaps I should google a little or start a new thread.

satori
2007-Feb-18, 03:21 PM
i am not sure whether i got you
i am not sure whether you got me