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ToSeek
2003-May-22, 05:19 PM
Courtesy of Mars Global Surveyor (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/)

News article (http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=11583)

carolyn
2003-May-22, 05:52 PM
Thats lovely :D

g99
2003-May-22, 06:07 PM
you an even see the moon! I love it.

ZappBrannigan
2003-May-23, 01:04 AM
Oh, very cool pictures. Finally I know what the Martians were on about in The War of the Worlds...

Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

StarTalker
2003-May-23, 11:54 AM
Besides Moon,Mars,where else have human already taken the pictures of Earth from? :roll:

Eta C
2003-May-23, 01:20 PM
Voyager or Pioneer, I forget which, took a picture of the Earth-Moon system on its way out. It was beyond the Moon's orbit (obviously) but not as far as Mars. This may be the picture from the longest distance yet taken.

kucharek
2003-May-23, 02:10 PM
Voyager or Pioneer, I forget which, took a picture of the Earth-Moon system on its way out. It was beyond the Moon's orbit (obviously) but not as far as Mars. This may be the picture from the longest distance yet taken.

You refer to this image:
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01967
It was recorded Sept. 18, 1977, by NASA's Voyager 1 when it was 7.25 million miles (11.66 million kilometers) from Earth

But, I guess the longest shot taken of Earth is in
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00451
A famous composite of the solar system taken by Voyager 1 on Feb. 14, 1990, from a distance of approximately 4 billion miles.

Hope that helps.

And congrats to Eta C for becoming Bad Apprentice. And this is my 777th post here on this board. In German, we call such numbers a "Schnapszahl" (Schnaps-Number). Let's have one. Gulp.

Harald

Jovianboy
2003-May-23, 02:14 PM
Voyager or Pioneer, I forget which, took a picture of the Earth-Moon system on its way out. It was beyond the Moon's orbit (obviously) but not as far as Mars. This may be the picture from the longest distance yet taken.

I haven't been around for a while, but anyway...
The most distant picture ever taken was from Voyager 1:



OFFICE OF PUBLIC INFORMATION
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NATIONAL AERONAUTICs AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA. TELEPHONE (213) 354-5Oll
P36089 C
Voyager

These six narrow-angle color images were made from the first ever
"portrait" of the solar system taken by Voyager 1, which was more than
4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic.
the spacecraft acquired a total of 60 frames for a mosaic of the solar
system which shows six of the planets. Mercury is too close to the
sun to be seen. Mars was not detectable by the Voyager cameras due to
scattered sunlight in the optics, and Pluto was not included in the
mosaic because of its small size and distance from the sun. These
blown-up images, left to right and top to bottom are Venus, Earth,
Jupiter, and Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. The background features in the
images are artifacts resulting from the magnification. The images
were taken through three color filters -- violet, blue and green --
and recombined to produce the color images. Jupiter and Saturn were
resolved by the camera but Uranus and Neptune appear larger than they
really are because of image times. Earth appears to be in a band of
light because it, coincidentally lies right in the center of the
scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the
sun. Earth was a crescent only 0.12 pixel in size. Venus was 0.11
pixel in diameter. The planetary images were taken with the
narrow-angle camera (1500 mm focal length).


Parting glances of Earth and five other worlds (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/image/planetary/solar_system/family_portraits.jpg)

From a NASA page.

Cheers,

Matt.

*edited to replace ridiculously over-sized image with the URL/link.

Eta C
2003-May-23, 02:23 PM
Indeed it does. Thanks for the good wishes also. :)

Argos
2003-May-23, 02:47 PM
Our little blue pearl. The image of Earth and Jupiter almost made me cry. And we look so lonely...

ToSeek
2003-May-23, 03:57 PM
Our little blue pearl. The image of Earth and Jupiter almost made me cry. And we look so lonely...

Where's purplekitten gotten to? You seem to need a hug. ;)

Rodina
2003-May-23, 04:28 PM
Please note, however, that it does, in fact, block the view of Venus.

g99
2003-May-23, 05:25 PM
Did anyone else notice what was ontop? :-)

pmcolt
2003-May-23, 06:15 PM
I love that shot of Earth and the Moon. Someday, I'd love to go out on a clear Martian night, point my telescope towards Earth and see that with my own eyes. Yeah, yeah, a guy can dream, can't he?

It's a great shot. But...wait a second. Where are the stars? It's in space, right? Shouldn't there be stars in the picture? *gasp* Could MGS be (dramatic pause) faked?! ;)

crazy4space
2003-May-23, 09:28 PM
Besides Moon,Mars,where else have human already taken the pictures of Earth from? :roll:

I have a great shot of the Galileo probe from December 16th 1992 on its second pass of the Earth from approx. 3.9 million miles hanging in my office - wish I could find it on the net to post it. :o

ToSeek
2003-May-23, 09:45 PM
Besides Moon,Mars,where else have human already taken the pictures of Earth from? :roll:

I have a great shot of the Galileo probe from December 16th 1992 on its second pass of the Earth from approx. 3.9 million miles hanging in my office - wish I could find it on the net to post it. :o

Will these do? (http://www.geosci.unc.edu/classes/Geo15/EarthGalileo.gif)

purplekitten
2003-May-24, 08:09 PM
Argos Wrote:

Our little blue pearl. The image of Earth and Jupiter almost made me cry. And we look so lonely...

Im right here :) *hugs Argos* :D

Some very poetic words there :cry: Earth does look so fragile and beautiful...

Those are some awesome pics.... :D

Crimson
2003-May-24, 10:58 PM
Besides Moon,Mars,where else have human already taken the pictures of Earth from? :roll:

I have a great shot of the Galileo probe from December 16th 1992 on its second pass of the Earth from approx. 3.9 million miles hanging in my office - wish I could find it on the net to post it. :o

Here it is (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00134), complete with the Moon.

Selenite
2003-May-24, 11:45 PM
The real eye behind the camera...

http://pages.prodigy.net/rhea54/tweety/marvin1.gif

tracer
2003-May-25, 05:40 AM
I have a great shot of the Galileo probe from December 16th 1992 on its second pass of the Earth from approx. 3.9 million miles hanging in my office - wish I could find it on the net to post it. :o

Here it is (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00134), complete with the Moon.
Note the following sentence in the caption for that picture:

"At the bottom of Earth's disk, Antarctica is visible through clouds."

Even in space, north is up and south is down. ;)

kilopi
2003-May-25, 12:40 PM
In the Earth and moon pic (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/earth_a100.jpg), the disk of the Earth is plainly visible, but the moon seems a lot smaller than the Earth. Shouldn't the moon have about a quarter of the diameter of the Earth? It seems at least half again that.

girlgeek
2003-May-25, 03:44 PM
Thanks for posting the pics, ToSeek. I couldn't load the page earlier, but now I can. Yea! :P

I have a question about the family portrait that Matt posted. Why is earth bathed in a streak of yellow light? It's early Sunday and I can't seem to come up with a good reason.

Thanks.
girlgeek

darkhunter
2003-May-25, 03:55 PM
In the Earth and moon pic (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/earth_a100.jpg), the disk of the Earth is plainly visible, but the moon seems a lot smaller than the Earth. Shouldn't the moon have about a quarter of the diameter of the Earth? It seems at least half again that.\
Its further away...perspective.

kilopi
2003-May-25, 04:02 PM
Its further away...perspective.
Can't be much farther away. On May 8, Mars was 139 million km from the Earth, and the moon was less than 385 thousand km farther. That's only 385/139000, or just three tenths of a percent difference.

Avatar28
2003-May-25, 04:03 PM
The picture's taken from 80 someodd million miles away. I can't see an additional quarter million miles as making that much difference in size due to perspective.

Argos
2003-May-25, 06:30 PM
Argos Wrote:

Our little blue pearl. The image of Earth and Jupiter almost made me cry. And we look so lonely...

Im right here :) *hugs Argos* :D


Thanks, purplekitten. Im feeling more comfortable now. :)

Seriously, its hard to believe that that little sphere can harbour so much misery and desolation. Those images seem to cry out loud: look at the abyss; see how minute you are; live and let live; enjoy your brief stay.

From Pink Floyds "Two Suns in The Sunset" (from the album "The Final Cut"):

"(...) Ashes and diamonds
Foe and friend
Well be all equal
In the end."

Edited 1 time for errors.

Darnon
2003-May-25, 06:59 PM
Perhaps it's not the moon, but PX?! :wink:

Darnon

ToSeek
2003-May-26, 12:39 AM
I have a question about the family portrait that Matt posted. Why is earth bathed in a streak of yellow light? It's early Sunday and I can't seem to come up with a good reason.


Caption for Matt's photo (http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/photo_gallery/caption/family_portraits.txt)

"Earth appears to be in a band of light because it, coincidentally lies right in the center of the scattered light rays resulting from taking the image so close to the sun."

StarTalker
2003-May-26, 12:58 PM
Argos Wrote:

Our little blue pearl. The image of Earth and Jupiter almost made me cry. And we look so lonely...

Im right here :) *hugs Argos* :D


Thanks, purplekitten. Im feeling more comfortable now. :)

Seriously, its hard to believe that that little sphere can harbour so much misery and desolation. Those images seem to cry out loud: look at the abyss; see how minute you are; live and let live; enjoy your brief stay.

From Pink Floyds "Two Suns in The Sunset" (from the album "The Final Cut"):

"(...) Ashes and diamonds
Foe and friend
Well be all equal
In the end."

Edited 1 time for errors.

Moving

kilopi
2003-May-26, 01:08 PM
Moving
Be sure and leave a forwarding address. (http://mentock.home.mindspring.com/index2.htm)

nebularain
2003-May-27, 07:39 PM
In the Earth and moon pic (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/earth_a100.jpg), the disk of the Earth is plainly visible, but the moon seems a lot smaller than the Earth. Shouldn't the moon have about a quarter of the diameter of the Earth? It seems at least half again that.

Will this help?

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap011015.html

kilopi
2003-May-27, 07:54 PM
Thanks Neb, those are lot better pics. As the caption says, the moon has a quarter of the diameter of the Earth.

I think I figured out my problem. When I was viewing the other photos, part of the moon was washed out so it looked a lot smaller. I enhanced the photo and it looked about twice as big as it had before--but the Earth stayed about the same size. My bad.

A.DIM
2003-May-27, 08:03 PM
Something just came to mind while reading about the relative sizes of the Earth-Moon system: isn't the Moon too large for a planet the size of Earth?

This is, perhaps, deserving of another thread, but...

kilopi
2003-May-27, 08:07 PM
Too large? I'm glad you told me, I think I still have the receipt.

A.DIM
2003-May-27, 08:56 PM
Too large? I'm glad you told me, I think I still have the receipt.

Seriously though, you know more about this than I - is it? I mean, isn't there some model that shows this?

kilopi
2003-May-27, 09:39 PM
It is rather largish, but what does it mean to be too large? Too large for what? It seems to be doing OK as it is, but are you thinking that it's a miracle or something that Earth was able to capture it?

Some of the current theories has it being built up on the spot.

A.DIM
2003-May-27, 10:38 PM
It is rather largish, but what does it mean to be too large? Too large for what? It seems to be doing OK as it is, but are you thinking that it's a miracle or something that Earth was able to capture it?

Some of the current theories has it being built up on the spot.

No, I'm not thinking its some sort of miracle that our moon is as large as it is; however, I don't subscribe to the"capture" theory either.
Seems like I read somewhere that when compared to all the other planets in our solar system, the Earth-Moon system contains a mass ratio out of whack with what is found elsewhere.

Avatar28
2003-May-27, 10:48 PM
Perhaps because the Earth is the only non-gas giant planet with a moon larger than an asteroid. Okay, well there is Pluto/Charon and that's even more out of whack.

kilopi
2003-May-28, 02:08 AM
Like my old music teacher used to say, somebody's always out of whack.

SeanF
2003-May-28, 01:25 PM
Like my old music teacher used to say, somebody's always out of whack.

I bet I know who he/she was talking about . . .
;)

kilopi
2003-May-28, 01:38 PM
You'd lose that bet. I never had an old music teacher, I just made that up. :)

But my point is that in a finite set, there is always one object that is smaller than all the rest, or larger than all the rest, or denser than all the rest. As my old geology teacher used to say, there's always one that's not as dense as all the rest.

SeanF
2003-May-28, 02:13 PM
You'd lose that bet. I never had an old music teacher, I just made that up. :)
What, do you work for the Times now?


But my point is that in a finite set, there is always one object that is smaller than all the rest, or larger than all the rest, or denser than all the rest. As my old geology teacher used to say, there's always one that's not as dense as all the rest.
Cute.

You're right, of course. People often assume that there must be something special about the "extremes," forgetting that there are always extremes.