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Kevn
2007-Mar-03, 06:00 PM
Anyone read this book? It came out in 2005, and in paperback last November.

I started it, but my brain is leaking out of my ears because of the bad astronomy, and I'm only into the first chapter.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Mar-03, 06:23 PM
So what's the idea - the same as the original? And give us an example of the bad astronomy, please.

torque of the town
2007-Mar-03, 06:49 PM
C'mon dude spill the beans.

Kevn
2007-Mar-03, 09:24 PM
This book is sort of a "reimagining" of the classic HG Wells book, but takes place "today" and in the USA.

Some of the "bad astronomy" (and possibly bad) are...


NASA/JPL lands a rover in Valles Marineris.
Communication time between Earth and Mars is 10 minutes.
A retired astronomer goes out into a field in Wisconsin with his portable telescope, and observes Valles Marineris and craters on Mars. He then sees a flash of light in the Valley.
He goes on the web afterwards to look for information, and except for space.com, only hits amateur sites and forums.
The big hypothesis is that it's volcanic activity.
"Nothing would cause a flash on the surface of Mars" (a quote).
All times quoted are standard 12 hour times.

And some of these are before the first 10 pages!!!

My problems with those above are...


Why land a rover in the Valley? Oh yeah, I can see it would be a great place, but I think the risks would be too great to risk it.
Even back in 2003 with the Mars opposition, I think a ten minute round trip comm time to Mars is too short, but I might be wrong.
Ummm... Can any ground-based scope see craters and Valles Marineris on Mars? I know my 16-inch SCT can't. And I know that the Valley and even Nix Olympica wasn't known of until the Mariner probe.
Why wouldn't an astronomer - even a retired one - not call someone "official" about the flash he observed? Why hang out in chat rooms?
Volcanic activity in the Valley? I don't think so sir!! (But what's funny is that years ago, while observing Mars at an opposition while listening to the War of the Worlds radio program, I thought that the "logical" place for the Martians to launch from were the volcanoes. Olympus Mons and the other volcanoes are huge launch complexes.)
No flashes ever observed on Mars? Why do we look for them at every opposition? Flashes have been seen before.
What astronomer do you know who says they observed at 9:35pm? The ones I know - if they don't use a 24 hour clock - use Universal Time.

I was going to just throw the book away, but I'm going to read it more, to find out how many other screw-ups the "author" puts in there. But I'm afraid more of my brain will leak out of my ears the more I read.

Lianachan
2007-Mar-03, 09:50 PM
This book is sort of a "reimagining" of the classic HG Wells book, but takes place "today" and in the USA.

So it's not at all like the recent abomination starring Mr Cruise?

Grand_Lunar
2007-Mar-03, 09:53 PM
Glad I read this, so as not to waste my time with this book. Glad I have the original.


Ummm... Can any ground-based scope see craters and Valles Marineris on Mars? I know my 16-inch SCT can't. And I know that the Valley and even Nix Olympica wasn't known of until the Mariner probe.

I don't think a ground based scope can see Valles Marineris. If it was possible, we'd have seen it before the Mariner probe saw it.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Mar-03, 10:20 PM
Even back in 2003 with the Mars opposition, I think a ten minute round trip comm time to Mars is too short, but I might be wrong.

I think you're wrong on this one (tho' probably not the others).

35,000,000 miles at opposition.
SOL 186,000 miles per second.

35,000,000 / 186,000 = 188sec = 3min 8sec

Kevn
2007-Mar-03, 10:32 PM
So it's not at all like the recent abomination starring Mr Cruise?
No, it's an abomination all it's own.

novaderrik
2007-Mar-03, 11:15 PM
i'm still waiting for "Da War of Da Woilds" as seen on SNL..

MG1962A
2007-Mar-04, 04:10 AM
On a more positive note, back in the mid 90's to celebrate the 100 years of the book. A collection of shorts was published, the authors had the brief of telling their tale within the HG Wells universe, but use a famous historical character as the narrator of their particular piece

Kevn
2007-Mar-04, 12:27 PM
On a more positive note, back in the mid 90's to celebrate the 100 years of the book. A collection of shorts was published, the authors had the brief of telling their tale within the HG Wells universe, but use a famous historical character as the narrator of their particular piece

Yeah, that was War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches. Very good book.

torque of the town
2007-Mar-04, 12:37 PM
So it's not at all like the recent abomination starring Mr Cruise?




Wallace and Gromits "A Grand Day Out" had more credibility than this film!


In fact I think NASA need to be mindful of a fridge type thing'y wielding a cosh and prowling the lunar suface..........

Maksutov
2007-Mar-04, 01:09 PM
On a more positive note, back in the mid 90's to celebrate the 100 years of the book. A collection of shorts was published, the authors had the brief of telling their tale within the HG Wells universe, but use a famous historical character as the narrator of their particular pieceI remember that, Rotwang!

Nice compendium.

Ronald Brak
2007-Mar-04, 01:24 PM
I remember reading, 'Night of the Cooters,' about H.G. Well's martians landing in Texas or some other imaginary place.

MG1962A
2007-Mar-05, 07:18 AM
I remember that, Rotwang!

Can you lend me a hand ;)

Jason Thompson
2007-Mar-05, 11:37 AM
And I know that the Valley and even Nix Olympica wasn't known of until the Mariner probe.

While that is true of Valles Marineris, Nix Olympica was observed from ground based scopes well before the Mariner probe, it just wasn't identified as a volcano until the orbiter saw it poking out above the dust storm.

parallaxicality
2007-Mar-05, 01:02 PM
No flashes ever observed on Mars? Why do we look for them at every opposition? Flashes have been seen before.

I have to wonder if the author ever actually read the original book.

http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=16151&highlight=perrotin

MG1962A
2007-Mar-05, 05:24 PM
While that is true of Valles Marineris, Nix Olympica was observed from ground based scopes well before the Mariner probe, it just wasn't identified as a volcano until the orbiter saw it poking out above the dust storm.
__________________


If memory serves a planet wide sandstorm engulfed everything as the probe was getting close. Three features, all volcanoes stuck up out of the muck as dark spots against the a lighter background. They were nick named Moe Larry and Curly, till better images could be secured.