PDA

View Full Version : warmth, science not politics



phaishazamkhan
2007-Mar-05, 12:20 AM
There was a recent article at the National Geographic's website about how Mars is slowly warming up (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/02/070228-mars-warming.html) based on observations of its polar ice caps. There have been other stories about Pluto, which is heading towards apheilion, is warming up too (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/pluto_warming_021009.html) in addition to Neptune's moon Triton (http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/19980526052143data_trunc_sys.shtml). Also scientists speculate the appearance of Red Jr. on Jupiter is a sign that Jupiter's mean temperature may rise by 10 degrees Fahrenheit.
Does the science behind these observations and theories have a firm foundation? Could it be that the Earth isn't the only object in the solar system undergoing climate change as part of a greater cycle linked to the sun? Or are these reports and observations simply the work of cranks and bad science?
The only thing I know is that global warming isn't beneficial for the ecosystem or human civilization.

BigDon
2007-Mar-05, 01:09 AM
I believe it was Toseek who pointed out that Pluto is warming because its doing its approach to the Sun and that the claims of the other planets warming up is a falsehood spread by either panic mongers or anti-panic mongers. Conspiracists of both sides have always been able to use the same piece of evidence to prove their side of any story.

phaishazamkhan
2007-Mar-05, 03:28 AM
Pluto's going away from the sun towards aphelion.

Also I was looking for science, not politics and conspiracies. If I wanted the latter two I would've asked at RedState. I'd use the eyeroll emoticon but it's very rude.

Kaptain K
2007-Mar-05, 05:24 AM
Yes, Pluto is past perihelion, but just barely.The reason it is still showing signs of warming is thermal inertia. For an example closer to home, consider summer here on Earth. Here in the northern hemisphere, we get the most sunlight in June, but the hottest days of the year are usually in August.