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Fraser
2007-Mar-05, 10:11 PM
Pluto has been in the news of late. One occasion saw its status as a planet come up for debate. Another concerns the New Horizons probe which is well on its way to meet our outermost planet.. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/03/05/is-pluto-a-planet/?1413)

Sticks
2007-Mar-06, 11:42 AM
No - The IAU has spoken

hhEb09'1
2007-Mar-06, 01:27 PM
Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/03/05/is-pluto-a-planet/?1413)

David Weintraub in his book Is Pluto a Planet? gives the sound scientific reasoning for his own resolution.
Ah, come on... ...please...:)

Does he say yea or nay?

Jakenorrish
2007-Mar-06, 02:45 PM
It doesn't matter what he says, the answer is that according to the IAU, Pluto is a 'dwarf planet'. Whatever that is!

aurora
2007-Mar-06, 05:08 PM
Pluto is an object that has certain properties. What we call it doesn't change what it is.

sail4evr
2007-Mar-06, 06:51 PM
I think that since nobody can make up their mind, I'll add my 2 cents.
Planets are usually described by another description as well as all those used. It is often said that for example earth the 3rd planet from the sun. Well Pluto can't make up its mind whether it is the eight or ninth planet because of its orbit. Therefore its ambiguity should proclaim itself as not a planet until it can set itself a proper orbit. If it was an adopted ie captured "planet" then at best it would be a half planet like a half brother, born by some other astrophysical anomoly or accident.

hhEb09'1
2007-Mar-06, 06:54 PM
Well Pluto can't make up its mind whether it is the eight or ninth planet because of its orbit. Therefore its ambiguity should proclaim itself as not a planet until it can set itself a proper orbit. Maybe if Neptune would quit avoiding him, they could have that conversation and work it out. Is Neptune the 8th or 9th? But NOOOooo, everyone blames Pluto. They treat it like a dog.

Jakenorrish
2007-Mar-07, 10:09 AM
Well, Aurora is spot on. We could call it a 'giant snowball' for all it would matter. A quote by the comedian Steven Wright could be applied to Pluto.....

'Its a small world, but I wouldn't wanna paint it'....

torque of the town
2007-Mar-07, 02:42 PM
There were nine planets in our system when I was a kid, and there always will be;)




Remember Sir Patrick Moore's Western Sea..........

Tobin Dax
2007-Mar-07, 03:20 PM
There were nine planets in our system when I was a kid, and there always will be;)


And that, IMO, is the stupidest reason I've ever heard. There's no logic to it, it's more of a "I fear change" type of attitude. :rolleyes:

(No offense to you, torque, I'm just referring to the validity of that argument.)

aurora
2007-Mar-07, 03:48 PM
When I was a kid, we didn't know about DNA.

So there will never be a model for inheritence.

torque of the town
2007-Mar-08, 10:27 AM
And that, IMO, is the stupidest reason I've ever heard. There's no logic to it, it's more of a "I fear change" type of attitude. :rolleyes:

(No offense to you, torque, I'm just referring to the validity of that argument.)



just Call me a sentimental fool:boohoo:

Jakenorrish
2007-Mar-08, 10:57 AM
And that, IMO, is the stupidest reason I've ever heard. There's no logic to it, it's more of a "I fear change" type of attitude. :rolleyes:

(No offense to you, torque, I'm just referring to the validity of that argument.)

What's changed exactly? Pluto hasn't changed that we know of since the IAU fudged this issue completely. Torque is entitled to call Pluto a Planet as far as I'm concerned. The term 'Dwarf Planet' recognises that Pluto is different to the other planets. However, Mercury and Jupiter (for example) have many differences from each other, so it really is a messy issue.

Ashadelo
2007-Mar-16, 05:21 AM
What's changed exactly? Pluto hasn't changed that we know of since the IAU fudged this issue completely. Torque is entitled to call Pluto a Planet as far as I'm concerned. The term 'Dwarf Planet' recognises that Pluto is different to the other planets. However, Mercury and Jupiter (for example) have many differences from each other, so it really is a messy issue.


This being one of the reasons why this debate will continue for a long time.

Kullat Nunu
2007-Mar-16, 09:03 PM
And that, IMO, is the stupidest reason I've ever heard. There's no logic to it, it's more of a "I fear change" type of attitude. :rolleyes:

Yet it seems to be a common argument...

The original question is wrong, actually; it should be "is there eight or dozens of planets in the solar system?" It is not about Pluto, it is about all those smaller-than-a-proper-planet-but-larger-than-chunks-of-ice-or-rock objects.

Professor Tanhauser
2007-Mar-16, 09:30 PM
As an american call pluto a planet. The IAU decided to demote pluto because it was discovered by an american and they wanted to slight america anyway they could.

They also held the demotion meeting on sunday when the americans were mostly packing up to go home and weren't in attendance.

Pluto's demotion was just a pathetic slap at americans because pluto was discovered by an american.

Tobin Dax
2007-Mar-16, 09:56 PM
Pluto's demotion was just a pathetic slap at americans because pluto was discovered by an american.

That's because it was an American who was insane enough to keep looking for something that wasn't there.

Tobin Dax
2007-Mar-16, 10:07 PM
What's changed exactly? Pluto hasn't changed that we know of since the IAU fudged this issue completely. Torque is entitled to call Pluto a Planet as far as I'm concerned. The term 'Dwarf Planet' recognises that Pluto is different to the other planets. However, Mercury and Jupiter (for example) have many differences from each other, so it really is a messy issue.

The whole point is that it's a messy issue. Mercury is a terrestrial planet, Jupiter is a Jovian planet, and Pluto is a dwarf planet. Uranus and Neptune can be classified as yet another type.

Pluto hasn't changed, but its classification has. In the last century, we've learned enough to reclassify it. This has happened before. I wouldn't doubt that it would happen again. The tem "planet" is historical and vague, and because of Pluto and all its cousins out there, and the fact that we finally have the technology to find them, the time came to set new classification standards. We did. Pluto is no longer a planet. That has changed, and people have responded to that change as people respond to almost any change.

You and torque can call Pluto what ever you want to. It's officially not a planet, and calling it one won't make it true, but I don't care if you call it a planet or not. Please don't imply that I was attacking him when I clearly stated that I wasn't.

Amber Robot
2007-Mar-19, 03:52 PM
Pluto's demotion was just a pathetic slap at americans because pluto was discovered by an american.

I'm an American, and I agree with the IAU decision. It was not a slap at all, just a sensible decision.

Nick4
2007-Jun-07, 05:02 AM
I still consider pluto a planet even though its not.

Identity 4
2007-Jun-07, 05:08 AM
old sentiments, eh? :) I was always told in school it was a planet (although a rather small and sad one...) Now i guess they are saying it has more in common with a comet. Thats probably very true...

hm....heres an odd thought....i wonder how common it is for things like comets and such to have satellites? ...hm... :)

-=Identity 4=-

Kullat Nunu
2007-Jun-07, 08:22 PM
hm....heres an odd thought....i wonder how common it is for things like comets and such to have satellites? ...hm... :)

Well, if you consider largest Kuiper Belt objects as gigantic comets, then the answer is very common at least in their case as majority of them have satellites.