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BigJim
2003-May-29, 01:56 AM
This is supposed to be a picture of Gemini 3 on the launch pad at night- why is the top white? Is it overexposed, or is that some sort of protective cover?

http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/iams/images/pao/GT3/10073866.jpg

Glom
2003-May-29, 11:37 AM
It does look a bit overexposed. There are bright lights on the space vehicle and none on the LUT and yet we can still see the LUT reasonably well.

Donnie B.
2003-May-29, 04:49 PM
What, you mean you don't remember the reactor meltdown that heated the capsule to white-hot? :P

JackC
2003-May-29, 05:50 PM
My opinion - overexposed.

I don't know when the pic was taken, but chances are, if it was mid-60s, a hand-held light meter MAY have been used - or a simple estimation of the shot taken by an experienced photographer. I did this all the time when I had my only sort of autopmatic Nikon FTN.

The spots in the lower right appear to be almost directly aimed at the nose, so any estimation of the average brightness of teh field would probably under-allow for the bright nose.

The shot had to be long to get the gantry detail, but that length would over-expose the brightly lit nose.

Even today, with most consumer-based automatic cameras, the shot may come out about the same. These cameras will judge light from the centre field. I do have a nice little Minolta though that offers som interesting averaging values as well, so the opportunity exists to take a different picture.

I think had that been done though, the gantry would not have been as visible and the photo would not have been as visually stunning.

Jack

David Hall
2003-May-30, 02:10 PM
Here's the next photo in the series. Capsule looks dark here.
http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/iams/images/pao/GT3/10073867.jpg

Edit: Here's another one at launch. Notice there's a bit of a reflective gleam on one side.
http://images.jsc.nasa.gov/iams/images/pao/GT3/10073869.jpg

Irishman
2003-Jun-01, 06:58 AM
The Gemini capsule is brightly lit, with the rest of the rocket and gantry with fewer lights. Thus the discrepancy in brightness causing overexposure on the nose.