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NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-14, 03:31 PM
CNN Does it again
Diets an unhealthy fix for teen weight concerns (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/diet.fitness/03/13/teen.weight.reut/index.html)

Summary: Teens who diet, tend to gain weight. :think:


It's possible, she explained, that people who are at greater risk of becoming overweight are also more likely to be dieters,


And...

Nevertheless, the findings show that dieting is a short-term fix that teens choose instead of longer-term, healthier -- and more effective -- strategies such as eating more fruits and vegetables
Isn't that dieting?

Why can't they just say you should adopt the right eating hapits. :rolleyes:

Fazor
2007-Mar-14, 04:32 PM
:) Well, if thier point was suppose to be that "eating healthy food and getting excersize shouldn't be dieting, it should be NORMAL" then I see where they're coming from. BUT I don't think that was thier point.

I think it should have said "crash diets" or "starvation diets", if that's what they're talking about. (methinks it is).

But since when does the media pay attention to details? It doesn't matter if the people get the right idea or not, just matters how many people read/watch the news. it's not like news should be informative or anything...

Peter Wilson
2007-Mar-14, 10:18 PM
Dieting doesn't work because the mind cannot fool the body.

If the government (the "mind") announces that sugar is to be rationed, what happens? Individuals (the "body") stock-pile sugar. So when your mind announces to your body, "calories are to be rationed," ("I'm going on a diet..."), your body responds in an appropriate manner: it begins "stock-piling" calories. (Or if that is not an option, when you inevitably go off-diet, your body stock-piles calories, "in case it happens again.")

Anyway, that is my pet-theory as to why dieting doesn't work...and I'm sticking to it ;)

Gillianren
2007-Mar-15, 08:48 AM
It's a pretty good analogy for what really happens.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-16, 06:37 PM
Todays candidate...
Playing video games improves eyesight (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17645473/)
People who started out as non-gamers and then received 30 hours of training on first-person action video games showed a substantial increase in their ability to see objects accurately in a cluttered space, compared to non-gamers given the same test,
Well, I can see that, But:
What about non-gamers, or maybe other visual stimulants? Would this be like saying bananas can help cure hunger? Why ones that involve firing guns?
How did they measure this? What test?
Why did they study this?

This sounds to me more like, "how can a university student justify long hours playing violent video games into?"

Fazor
2007-Mar-16, 07:09 PM
Todays candidate...
Playing video games improves eyesight (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17645473/)
People who started out as non-gamers and then received 30 hours of training on first-person action video games showed a substantial increase in their ability to see objects accurately in a cluttered space, compared to non-gamers given the same test,
Well, I can see that, But:
What about non-gamers, or maybe other visual stimulants? Would this be like saying bananas can help cure hunger? Why ones that involve firing guns?
How did they measure this? What test?
Why did they study this?

This sounds to me more like, "how can a university student justify long hours playing violent video games into?"


I'd love to believe this, but I'm fairly certian that the hours I spend playing WoW (ontop of the 8 hours a day I spend on the computers at work) have a much more detrimental effect on my vision than any supposed benefits.

Wouldn't spending a few hours a day with "Where's Waldo" type books give the same benefit? Isn't the real conclusion "People who practice identfing object in cluttered spaces are better at identifing objects in cluttered spaces"?

Of course, I like video games, so we can always just nod and go along with that study's version of life :)

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-16, 07:36 PM
..."People who practice identfing object in cluttered spaces are better at identifing objects in cluttered spaces"?...
How can that work?

(actually, that's good phrasing for what I was thinking)

Fazor
2007-Mar-16, 08:12 PM
:) It just falls under one of my favorite catagories ('caus I get to use one of the few scientific words I know and possibly sound intelligent for a change).

And that's the simple, but extreemely common on all levels of science, mistake of confusing an indirrect corrolation for a dirrect one.

(coincidentally, one of my fav Simpsons scenes on this topic)


Homer "Ah, the bear patrol works perfectly! Not a single Bear in sight!"
Lisa "Thats facetious (sp?) reasoning dad"
Homer "Thank you!"
Lisa "No! I mean, take this rock. You don't see any tigers around do you? So this rock must repell tigers"
Homer "I'll give you twenty dollars for said rock!!"
Lisa "No! Oh..." *shrugs and swaps money for rock*


edit: speaking of mistakes, i said indirrect twice. corrected to make more sense :)

Peter Wilson
2007-Mar-16, 09:44 PM
edit: speaking of mistakes, i said indirrect twice. corrected to make more sense :)

You also "r-ed" indirect incorrectly twice ;)

closetgeek
2007-Mar-19, 04:13 PM
No WOW makes life better in every aspect. That's what I tell myself anyway. As for video games, I will say this. I spent some time playing on the Wii with my kids and I felt like I got a workout. I think that was a genius idea from Nintendo. Now we can use it to babysit our children and know they are getting exercise. Lol, that was a joke. They do have a limited amount of electronic entertainment time. I just like it cuz we are all moving rather than sitting on the couch, blindly staring at the tv.


I'd love to believe this, but I'm fairly certian that the hours I spend playing WoW (ontop of the 8 hours a day I spend on the computers at work) have a much more detrimental effect on my vision than any supposed benefits.

Wouldn't spending a few hours a day with "Where's Waldo" type books give the same benefit? Isn't the real conclusion "People who practice identfing object in cluttered spaces are better at identifing objects in cluttered spaces"?

Of course, I like video games, so we can always just nod and go along with that study's version of life :)

Fazor
2007-Mar-19, 04:50 PM
You also "r-ed" indirect incorrectly twice ;)

Yeah I always do that, but I don't know why. I know it's wrong, and it just looks wrong, but I still always type it that way. Altho I don't do it when I write the word by hand. *shrugs* probably the same reason why i always type business "Buisness" and any word that starts with "prob" ends up "probably" even if i'm trying to type "problem" "probable" etc. I think there's a few lazy neurons in the typing section of my brain.

mugaliens
2007-Mar-19, 07:19 PM
When I was in high school, no one worried about dieting. We were all too busy playing soccer, vollyball, tennis, football, field hockey, bicycling, track and field, swimming, etc., to grow fat.

Even then, some were a bit heavier set than others, but it was the extremely rare exception to the case, and even they played sports.

I'm scratching my head trying to remember if there was anyone who was a "fatty" who wasn't on the football team, and I'm drawing a complete blank. Even going through my yearbook, I think there was only one such person in our graduating class of more than 500 who didn't actually play one sport or another, either officially with the school or unofficially, such as sandlot baseball or pickup soccer.

Argos
2007-Mar-19, 07:56 PM
The word 'diet' alone defines an eating plan, though culturally it is related to losing weight. Years ago ago I made a diet to fatten.

danscope
2007-Mar-19, 08:05 PM
When I was in high school, no one worried about dieting. We were all too busy playing soccer, vollyball, tennis, football, field hockey, bicycling, track and field, swimming, etc., to grow fat.

Even then, some were a bit heavier set than others, but it was the extremely rare exception to the case, and even they played sports.

I'm scratching my head trying to remember if there was anyone who was a "fatty" who wasn't on the football team, and I'm drawing a complete blank. Even going through my yearbook, I think there was only one such person in our graduating class of more than 500 who didn't actually play one sport or another, either officially with the school or unofficially, such as sandlot baseball or pickup soccer.

The introduction of high fructose corn syrup into 85% of everything you eat
has been a contributor to the fat problem. It is a national and scientific disgrace. Powerfull interests are making money.
Arm yourself with education and the hard work of making better decisions when you eat and what you eat, and "WHERE" you eat. And....the exercise is a good thing.
Best regards, Dan

Peter Wilson
2007-Mar-19, 09:39 PM
And after they outlawed trans-fat (or whatever it was) I thought all our food was safe!

:doh:

Gillianren
2007-Mar-19, 10:04 PM
I've never been one for organized sports, but my best friend and I used to take walks all the time. I attribute my current weight gain (though I'm slowly losing again) to the fact that my body is no longer up to walking a mile or two at a go.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-20, 04:26 PM
Ok; I never heard of this cure, apparently it's pretty popular.

Ouch: Duct Tape May Not Get Rid Of Warts (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/11298561/detail.html)

And just to make sure the study meant nothing:


But researchers used transparent duct tape. Only later did they learn that the transparent variety does not contain rubber, unlike the better-known, gray duct tape that appeared to be effective in the 2002 study.


Edit to add:
Must be big news because there's more than one local station (different networks) carrying the story.
But this one in Readers Digest form (http://www.wkyc.com/news/health/health_article.aspx?storyid=64598)

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-21, 05:55 PM
...Wouldn't spending a few hours a day with "Where's Waldo" type books give the same benefit?...

Yes, according to this article. (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17705002/)

Interesting, a research article that actually says something.

mugaliens
2007-Mar-21, 08:22 PM
I never gained more than 6% body fat until I'd exited the "sports is for fun" mode.

Since then, I've returned, quite remarkably, towards a lighter load, because I've chosen activity over inactivity, healthy food over unhealthy food, and smaller portions over larger ones.

Three simple steps, people.

If you can't take these steps, then spend tens of thousands of dollars getting your stomach stapled shut.

Or die.

Your choice either way.

I've chosen life, and don't for a second tell me some people are somehow "unable" to make that choice.

Everyone makes choices, and how they live or die are a direct result of the choices they make.

Gillianren
2007-Mar-21, 08:36 PM
Really? You don't think some people can't make the choice of activity over inactivity?

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-21, 09:06 PM
I've chosen life, and don't for a second tell me some people are somehow "unable" to make that choice.
Sorry, too good a setup.



Choose Life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a ****ing big television, choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players and electrical tin openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisurewear and matching luggage. Choose a three-piece suite on hire purchase in a range of ****ing fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the **** you are on Sunday night. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing, spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing ****ing junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, ****ing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, ****ed up brats you spawned to replace yourselves. Choose your future. Choose life... But why would I want to do a thing like that? I chose not to choose life. I chose somethin' else. And the reasons? There are no reasons. Who needs reasons when you've got heroin?


Incidentally, there's lots of reasons out of a person's control which can make it impossible to chose activity over inactivity, including Osteoarthritis, depression and heart diseases, but from the smug self satisfied tone of your post I'd expect you to call those self induced.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-26, 08:09 PM
And for today...
Child care linked to later behavioral issues (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/parenting/03/26/childcare.ap/index.html)



• Kids in child care longer had more behavior problems in sixth grade
• Kids who'd been in child care also had better vocabulary scores in fifth grade
• Differences are still relatively small, National Institutes of Health says
• Results are from largest U.S. study of child care and development


How did they remove the parenting from the study. An important point since they stated this:
The researchers said that the increase in vocabulary and problem behaviors was small, and that parenting quality was a much more important predictor of child development.
Doesn't it just follow normally that parents who don't have the time for thier children tend to leave them longer in daycare?

Gillianren
2007-Mar-26, 08:26 PM
Doesn't it just follow normally that parents who don't have the time for thier children tend to leave them longer in daycare?

Depends on your definitions, really, and even then, no. When I was in junior high school, my little sister was left in daycare; I went home alone. Clearly, my mother didn't have extra time for me even though I've never been in daycare in my life. Honestly, it was that I'm more trustworthy than my little sister and can be left home alone. She couldn't. She's 26 now, and I still wouldn't leave her home alone.

Given the operating hours of daycare centers, too, a parent who works very hard during regular business hours but spends all weekend with their kid shows different parenting than one who doesn't put their kid in daycare but works evening and weekends. This isn't anybody's fault, necessarily, but it's a fact of life, at least in Olympia.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-26, 08:34 PM
Depends on your definitions, ...
I can understand what your saying, but I would think that the people stuck in those situations still have about the same ratio of inattentive parententing vs attentive, and the people not in those situation change the ratio based on convenience.

So; I would like to see how they account for that, or what facts show that it is not important, or sways it one way or another.

closetgeek
2007-Mar-26, 10:01 PM
Some of it is genetics, and that is undeniable. I was always an active kid. I was in Ballet, Jazz, Tapdancing, Gymnastic and track. Always a chubby kid though. My mother didn't starve us of junk food but that was very rationed. I maybe had a twinkie once a month. We had balanced meals and soda was a real treat. I was just a chubby kid. I think now though, other factors that add on to the weight problem is that everything is easier now than it was when I was young. If we wanted to get anywhere it was either hoof it or bike it. Now they have electric scooters and the likes so they don't ever have to break a sweat.

I never gained more than 6% body fat until I'd exited the "sports is for fun" mode.

Since then, I've returned, quite remarkably, towards a lighter load, because I've chosen activity over inactivity, healthy food over unhealthy food, and smaller portions over larger ones.

Three simple steps, people.

If you can't take these steps, then spend tens of thousands of dollars getting your stomach stapled shut.

Or die.

Your choice either way.

I've chosen life, and don't for a second tell me some people are somehow "unable" to make that choice.

Everyone makes choices, and how they live or die are a direct result of the choices they make.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-27, 07:46 PM
How about a way to make a Healthy Pizza (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/03/26/pizza.antioxidants.reut/index.html)?


• Researchers enhanced the antioxidant content of whole-grain wheat pizza dough
• Antioxidant levels rose by up to 60 percent with longer baking times
• Fatty toppings negate any good health effects, researchers said
Who wants a Pizza without the fatty toppings? :think:

Fazor
2007-Mar-27, 08:08 PM
Doesn't pizza without fatty toppings end up as just a large, round breadstick with the dipping sauce already on top?

Peter Wilson
2007-Mar-27, 08:17 PM
Who wants a Pizza without the fatty toppings? :think:

What is pizza without the fatty toppings?

An open-face tomato-sauce sandwich? :think:

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-28, 04:03 PM
Children's TV ads loaded with junk food (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17831211/)
Well; duh;
At least now we have numbers to back it up.

But; how do you tell a manufacturer to stop that? For the big guys that have many product lines that's fine. But; what's a potato chip, or candy company going to do?

Peter Wilson
2007-Mar-28, 09:46 PM
For the big guys that have many product lines that's fine. But; what's a potato chip, or candy company going to do?:boohoo:

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-29, 12:57 PM
But; how do you tell a manufacturer to stop that? For the big guys that have many product lines that's fine. But; what's a potato chip, or candy company going to do?
Since they are making products that are bad for people I really don't care what happens to them when they have to stop pushing their garbage.

NEOWatcher
2007-Mar-29, 02:00 PM
Since they are making products that are bad for people I really don't care what happens to them when they have to stop pushing their garbage.
I guess I didn't make myself clear.
I agree that they make bad products and that we are better of without them, but in the context of this article, they are talking about voluntary measures. Fat chance (pun intended)

In the end, the consumer must have some intelligence, and that aint happnin. (as a whole)
If consumers were conciensious of this, then bad food makers would be advertising more of a "If you're going to choose one, choose ours".

But right now, you only see that going on in alcohol. Probably because consumers, as a whole, are more aware of alcohol effects.

BTW, another point is that it is easier to mass produce and market something with a shelf life. Good foods generally have a short shelf life and end up being local, or regional markets. Add to that, especially for produce, you have a wide variability in quality based on conditions, and that's very hard to market.

Fazor
2007-Mar-29, 03:07 PM
Since they are making products that are bad for people I really don't care what happens to them when they have to stop pushing their garbage.

Cars kill thousands of people every year. Should we ban all car companies from advertising?

Yes, junk food is "bad" for you in excess. But it's not inherantly bad. If you remember from a month or two ago, someone died from too much water. ANYTHING taken in excess is bad. But in moderation, "junk" food is fine.

Why is it the company's fault that people don't have a propper diet?

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-29, 03:25 PM
Cars kill thousands of people every year. Should we ban all car companies from advertising?
I wouldn't care if banning car ads made the car companies lose money, which was my point.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-05, 03:02 PM
Try to be careful on this one, it could turn political if you get carried away.
I would like to point out the numbers mean nothing to me, not make any statement about immigration.

But:
Census: Immigrants stabilize big-city populations (http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/04/05/metro.population.ap/index.html)

• Without foreign immigration, many metro areas would be losing population
• Atlanta area added most people from 2000 to 2006
• St. George, Utah, is nation's fastest growing metro area
As opposed to what?
What is the poplulation growth due to immigration outside fo the metro areas?

What about other factors, like?
Without births, the metro area would be losing population.
Without people moving in, the metro area would be losing population.

Fazor
2007-Apr-05, 05:56 PM
Try to be careful on this one, it could turn political if you get carried away.
I would like to point out the numbers mean nothing to me, not make any statement about immigration.

But:
Census: Immigrants stabilize big-city populations (http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/04/05/metro.population.ap/index.html)

As opposed to what?
What is the poplulation growth due to immigration outside fo the metro areas?

What about other factors, like?
Without births, the metro area would be losing population.
Without people moving in, the metro area would be losing population.


I actually just e-mailed my Prof. a link to that article. That's what my last class is before I graduate is all about: Urban Politics. As to the last statement about "without people moving in", that's part of the problem. Not too many people move IN to the city, particularly the slums/ghettos that they're talking about with the immigrant population. They did a poor job of stating exactly what they are talking about, but they're trying to say that the new immigrants are filling the void from the ones that have "moved on up, to the east side and finally gotten a piece of the pie" :)

Really I found the article quite pointless. It starts out talking about influx immigration filling the void left by "urban sprawl" (but poorly defines what they're talking about) then degenerates into random population facts.

closetgeek
2007-Apr-10, 02:38 PM
Fruits and healthy snacks should not have to be advertised, they should be a given. On a lot of the kids channels, though, I do see plenty of suggestions for better snacks provided by the actual station. As far as I am concerned McDonald's, Lay's, and Hershey's can advertise all they want. My kids can beg all they want, I am still ultimately in control of what they put in their mouths.


Children's TV ads loaded with junk food (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17831211/)
Well; duh;
At least now we have numbers to back it up.

But; how do you tell a manufacturer to stop that? For the big guys that have many product lines that's fine. But; what's a potato chip, or candy company going to do?

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-10, 02:44 PM
Fruits and healthy snacks should not have to be advertised, they should be a given. On a lot of the kids channels, though, I do see plenty of suggestions for better snacks provided by the actual station. As far as I am concerned McDonald's, Lay's, and Hershey's can advertise all they want. My kids can beg all they want, I am still ultimately in control of what they put in their mouths.
And that's how it should be... Ok, now slap me and wake me up.

mugaliens
2007-Apr-10, 05:11 PM
CNN Does it again
Diets an unhealthy fix for teen weight concerns (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/diet.fitness/03/13/teen.weight.reut/index.html)

Summary: Teens who diet, tend to gain weight. :think:


And...

Isn't that dieting?

Why can't they just say you should adopt the right eating hapits. :rolleyes:


Because positive, healthy thinking doesn't sell newspapers. To do that, they have to incite fear, then hint that if you'll just read the article, they can help you fix the problem.

Must not be working - kids are fatter than ever, today.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-13, 04:17 PM
Gene Impacts Obesity Risk (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/11738985/detail.html)


British scientists have found a new fat gene, but they have no idea what it does.

How do they know that the gene is really related, and not some other relationship? For instance, nationality X has genes a,b,c. Nationality X eats more of whatever.
Statistical nothingness.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-13, 06:28 PM
It sounds like yet a statistics crapshoot, where they look through all the genes in their sample group and try to find one that matches the trait they're looking at then once such a correlation is found, they publish without trying so see if there's a mechanism relating the gene and the trait, possibly without even looking at a different sample group to see if that same correlation exists.

I've seen that story too many times to be impressed, remember the time they found the gene for homosexuality:wall:

mugaliens
2007-Apr-13, 10:35 PM
Cars kill thousands of people every year. Should we ban all car companies from advertising?

Yes, actually, we should. A bad thing is BAD, and there's no arguing around it.

Take DiHidrogen Monoxide, for example - it kills thousands each year, and as such, it should be banned, too...

(uh... ahem... those recognizing the term know this in tongue in cheek; those that don't, please Google it. Thanks).

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-17, 03:57 PM
Kids with head injury apt to have another (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/conditions/04/16/kids.head.injury.reut/index.html)

Within 6 months of the initial injury, 2.4 percent of the children suffered a subsequent head injury, the investigators report in the medical journal Pediatrics. Within 12 months, 4.1 percent had had a subsequent head injury.

Can you say "clumsy kid"? :think:

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-17, 05:55 PM
Can you say abusive parents?

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-17, 06:12 PM
Can you say abusive parents?
That thought crossed my mind, but I didn't want to go there, although I will go to over-permissive parents...or "don't worry, he's just a kid".

Gillianren
2007-Apr-17, 09:17 PM
Also, 4.1% isn't really very many. I think that figure is enough to cover both clumsy kids and abusive parents.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-23, 07:16 PM
High-Fat Breakfast May Increase Stress (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/12903725/detail.html)

The senior author of the study, Tavis Campbell, said that it was not clear what caused the effect, or what its long-term implications are.

As apposed to what? Don't we all know what fat does to the body?

LurchGS
2007-Apr-24, 03:16 AM
Y'know, I've been thinking about this bit with the video games. I'm not convinced it improves your eyesight (though for a man of my age my eyesight isn't awful. NOt bad for a blind guy)

*BUT*, video games such as first person shooters (there are others that require the same skill set that aren't anywhere near fo violent) might improve pattern recognition skills.

Think of it as sudoku for the eyes.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-24, 12:35 PM
Y'know, I've been thinking about this bit with the video games.
That's exactly what the article said.
It didn't do anything about the physical characteristics of the eye bringing the image to your brain. It dealt with the brain's interpretation of what that signal is. Therefore, any interpretive function of eyesight can be improved where physically it is not.

And of course, the reporter highlights the "eyesight" portion of this.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-24, 04:57 PM
Study: Nursing Won't Stop Child Obesity (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/12993032/detail.html)



Perhaps the obesity-preventing benefits of breast-feeding are strong for children but wane by adulthood, said the official, Larry Grummer-Strawn.


First: The reporter might want to know what the difference between and adult and a child is...



Still, the researchers believe the women's recollections of breast-feeding are reliable. ...

"A mother knows whether she breast-fed her child," said Michels, an associate professor of epidemiology.

Yep; something like that is probably easy to forget...;)

And, just to throw in a sexist remark...
How do you trust a study where you ask a woman thier weight? :whistle:

SeanF
2007-Apr-24, 05:04 PM
Perhaps the obesity-preventing benefits of breast-feeding are strong for children but wane by adulthood, said the official, Larry Grummer-Strawn.
First: The reporter might want to know what the difference between and adult and a child is...
I'm afraid I don't understand your objection to this statement. :think:

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-24, 05:12 PM
I'm afraid I don't understand your objection to this statement. :think:
The reporter introduces the article as "child obesity" but the entire study had to do with "adult obesity".

SeanF
2007-Apr-24, 06:52 PM
The reporter introduces the article as "child obesity" but the entire study had to do with "adult obesity".
Oh, I see. It's the headline that's wrong. Thanks. :)

Fazor
2007-Apr-24, 09:05 PM
I didn't read the article, but couldn't it have something to do with the fact that mothers that breast-feed, at least the ones I know, do it because of the health-benifits. Therefore, they tend to be more health-consious people. Therefore they feed thier kids healthier food as they grow up? Therefor as they become adults and start making thier own decisions about what to eat, they may start to eat less healthy?

I'm not saying every case fits into the "i breastfed therefore fed my kids healthier/I bottle fed and didn't care what my kid ate" thing, but just saying arent' there a lot of contributing factors that may have nothing to do with breast feeding?

Gillianren
2007-Apr-24, 10:13 PM
And, just to throw in a sexist remark...
How do you trust a study where you ask a woman thier weight? :whistle:

I'd tell you mine if I thought you had a reason to know. But, to be fair, would you tell me yours if you thought I had a reason to know, or would you maybe fudge a few pounds? In short, is it just a feminine trait, or is it a trait that we believe is feminine?

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-25, 12:05 PM
I'd tell you mine if I thought you had a reason to know. But, to be fair, would you tell me yours if you thought I had a reason to know, or would you maybe fudge a few pounds? In short, is it just a feminine trait, or is it a trait that we believe is feminine?
Which is why I indicated it was a sexist remark. It's not based on fact, only commonly held beliefs. I think most people fudge their weight at some time or another for various reasons.

Maybe we should do a study?;)

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-25, 04:10 PM
Kids Eat More After Food Ads In Study (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/13082250/detail.html)



After, the kids who saw food ads ate more. But those who were considered obese -- 11 of the 59 -- ate 134 percent more food. Overweight children doubled their intake, and those considered normal weight went up 84 percent.

134% more...I hate that. Is it 134% of the normal or 234% of the normal? Considering they say double, I would assume the later one.

Anyway, in summary, a food ad causes kids to eat more.

Sounds like the ad agency is doing their job well. :lol:

Gillianren
2007-Apr-25, 09:38 PM
Which is why I indicated it was a sexist remark. It's not based on fact, only commonly held beliefs. I think most people fudge their weight at some time or another for various reasons.

Maybe we should do a study?;)

Actually, I just wrote a piece today about the annoyances of plus-size dress shopping. (I've been looking for an elegant black dress, on request from my boyfriend. It's astonishingly hard to find one in my size--though if I wanted a muumuu, caftan, or daishiki, I'd be set.)

LurchGS
2007-Apr-26, 05:08 AM
Can you say abusive parents?

Henrik - I have to disagree with this.

1) I think parental abuse tends to focus below the neck - broken arms/ribs and the like. I could be wrong, not seen any studies on it - just going on experience.

2) I don't consider myself abusive - yet my younger boy was in the hospital 3 times in a year for stitches to his head. Since then (10 years) he's got whacked in the head by a golf club, and fallen from a scooter and broken a tooth (there are almost certainly many events of which I am unaware).

I note they don't provide an age grouping in the article. how many of those 11 thousand patients were under the age of 18 months? How many injuries were from learning to walk and falling on a door-jamb? How many, on the other hand, were like Megalon's - the result of a younger sibling trying to keep up with an older?

There's a lot of factors left out of the article before we can start pointing fingers

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-26, 04:21 PM
Alternate title "Gillianren in Ireland".

Report: Text messaging harms written language (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/04/26/ireland.text.message.reut/index.html)


The report laments that, in many cases, candidates seemed "unduly reliant on short sentences, simple tenses and a limited vocabulary".


I don't think we ever touched on this before.

mugaliens
2007-Apr-26, 04:26 PM
Why can't they just say you should adopt the right eating hapits. :rolleyes:

Because informing the public about something it already knows doesn't sell newspapers. Making a buck in that industry requires one to inflate an issue, instill fear, then sell the solution for 50 cents during the weekdays.

Fazor
2007-Apr-26, 05:08 PM
Because informing the public about something it already knows doesn't sell newspapers. Making a buck in that industry requires one to inflate an issue, instill fear, then sell the solution for 50 cents during the weekdays.

Goes back to my favorite, "Simple household item that you are probably holding in your hand right now and your children have access to could kill you instantly!!!! ....Find out what it is at 11:00"

:rolleyes:

Peter Wilson
2007-Apr-26, 06:31 PM
Ok, its 11:32.

Are you going to tell us, or keep us in suspense?

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-26, 06:38 PM
It's a fork, right?

SeanF
2007-Apr-26, 06:51 PM
Here's (http://news.scotsman.com/health.cfm?id=634472007) another study about junk food ads aimed at kids.

I'm really just linking to it because of the headline, though. :)

"Get in my belly!"

Fazor
2007-Apr-26, 06:52 PM
It's a fork, right?

The correct answer was, "A glass of water"
See Woman Dies After Water Drinking Contest (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16614865/)

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-26, 06:59 PM
Here's (http://news.scotsman.com/health.cfm?id=634472007) another study about junk food ads aimed at kids.
That's the same study I mention above (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=975114&postcount=57).

Gillianren
2007-Apr-26, 07:20 PM
I'm really just linking to it because of the headline, though. :)

Well, obese children are probably more tender.

SeanF
2007-Apr-26, 07:55 PM
That's the same study I mention above (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=975114&postcount=57).

You know, I even glanced through the thread, but I didn't see that post...

Oh, well, my headline's better, anyway. :D

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-26, 09:09 PM
Well, obese children are probably more tender.
And the Irish are the best (http://art-bin.com/art/omodest.html).

Peter Wilson
2007-Apr-26, 09:47 PM
Well, obese children are probably more tender.
Yeah, Hansel & Gretel found that out the hard way!

Of course, back then there were no studies...

LurchGS
2007-Apr-29, 04:16 AM
sure there were - they just called them libraries!

NEOWatcher
2007-May-02, 06:36 PM
The incredible edible egg...

Women On Egg Diets Lose Weight Faster [than on bagels] (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/13243379/detail.html)



...The research, which was funded by the American Egg Board...The study's results are considered statistically unlikely to be due to chance, but were near the mathematical limit for that distinction.

Moose
2007-May-02, 07:00 PM
Of course, the women lost weight through decomposing after their cholesterol-induced massive heart attacks.

NEOWatcher
2007-May-15, 07:04 PM
Study: Web can encourage exercise (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/internet/05/15/internet.exercise.reut/index.html)

or...Study: telling somebody to exercise can encourage exercise...



One year later, all three groups were doing similarly well, Marcus and her colleagues found. Those who used the tailored Web site were getting an average of 90 minutes of exercise per week, as were men and women in the group that received help by mail.

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-07, 01:28 PM
This one doesn't actually mean nothing, but I felt it was similar because it is a statistician's playground that can be used to show just about anything, and the missing relationships make it very grey.

Accidental death rate creeping higher in U.S. (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19080118/from/RS.4/)

Just about every paragraph I have asked 2 questions.
What was population growth in that time period?
What is the percentage of that age group compared to the previous period?

But they do that to compare it to a declining period.

A few standouts...

The nation’s accidental death rate has been gradually creeping higher and is up 12 percent compared to the lowest rate on record
Now there's a fair comparison.



Older motorcycle operators also add to the death toll, McMillan said. Thirty-five percent of motorcycle deaths in 2005 were among bikers age 45 and older. A decade earlier, 15 percent of biker deaths were among the older age group

How many motorcycle riders in total and 45 and up were there then and now? I would assume the growth is not in line considering the gas prices.



Accidents are the fifth leading cause of death behind heart disease, cancer, stroke and respiratory disease, the council said. But for people ages 1 to 44, accidents are the top killer.

Does this mean old age does not affect young people?

Peter Wilson
2007-Jun-07, 06:42 PM
It means if you are not tragically killed at a young age through recklesness, you'll die due to the slow, cumulative effects of bad habits :)

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-08, 05:34 PM
This one sounds like a lot of nunsense.

A study using nuns shows that beer may help to reduce cholesterol levels. (http://www.wkyc.com/news/watercooler/watercooler_article.aspx?storyid=69317)


Fifty nuns drank a pint of beer for 45 days, then stopped for six months.

Is that anything like that endless basket of fish in the bible?


The study was conducted out by a group financed by the Spanish Beer Makers' Association.
Yep; completely independent.

Fazor
2007-Jun-08, 05:37 PM
Nunsense? Drinking beer reduces stress which reduces cholesterol. :) At least, until the nun wakes up next to that monk who's not nearly as hot as he looked last night...

"Ah, alcohol. The cause of...AND solution to...all of life's problems!"

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-08, 06:10 PM
Nunsense? Drinking beer reduces stress which reduces cholesterol. :)
Not to mention it's a bad habit.

Fazor
2007-Jun-08, 06:17 PM
Not to mention it's a bad habit.

Oh no, it's spreading quicker than we can kill it! Do they make pesticide for puns?

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-08, 06:19 PM
Oh no, it's spreading quicker than we can kill it! Do they make pesticide for puns?
No; they always had trouble with the pungent aroma.

Fazor
2007-Jul-10, 03:49 PM
Well here's a good one for this thread:
Women drawn to men with muscles (http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyid=2007-07-09T222618Z_01_N09290845_RTRUKOC_0_US-SEX-MUSCLES.xml)


Muscular young men are likely to have more sex partners than their less-chiseled peers, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles said on Monday.

....uh.....duh?

Lurker
2007-Jul-10, 06:19 PM
Well here's a good one for this thread:
Women drawn to men with muscles (http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyid=2007-07-09T222618Z_01_N09290845_RTRUKOC_0_US-SEX-MUSCLES.xml)
Quote:
Muscular young men are likely to have more sex partners than their less-chiseled peers, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles said on Monday.

....uh.....duh?
Yeah well, I'm here to tell ya that there are more than enough women who find a guy that can recite pi or the permeability of free space (μ0) to 40 or 50 places, or who can compare and contrast a variety of computer architecture types, really hot... that I have had few reasons to be concerned... :)

NEOWatcher
2007-Jul-10, 06:49 PM
Well here's a good one for this thread:
Women drawn to men with muscles (http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyid=2007-07-09T222618Z_01_N09290845_RTRUKOC_0_US-SEX-MUSCLES.xml)


Muscular young men are likely to have more sex partners than their less-chiseled peers, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles said on Monday.

....uh.....duh?
Or known by it's other title... How I got credit for spending time at muscle beach.

Fazor
2007-Jul-10, 06:54 PM
I was going to post the dangers of this phenomenon by linking the article about the highschool football player who was free-lifting by himself with tragic but not un-foreseeable results, but thought it would be a bit unsensative even for me.

NEOWatcher
2007-Jul-10, 06:55 PM
I was going to post the dangers of this phenomenon by linking the article about the highschool football player who was free-lifting by himself with tragic but not un-foreseeable results, but thought it would be a bit unsensative even for me.
I was considering that one for the Darwin 2007 thread, but I do see some connection.

John Mendenhall
2007-Jul-11, 02:40 PM
Or known by it's other title... How I got credit for spending time at muscle beach.

Being a muscular old guy doesn't hurt, either.

NEOWatcher
2007-Jul-11, 04:52 PM
Poll: 92 percent want 'country of origin' labels (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19709686/)


“I was definitely shocked at how high these numbers were,” said the study’s coauthor

I'm not, considering what people want in a label vs what people will do because of the label are two completely different questions.

I am very interested in where the food is coming from and would have said yes to the poll, but will it change my buying habits?
Probably not, because, for one, I don't have a lot of shopping choices in my neighborhood. (there's only one major grocery store within a 20 minute drive)
And; for many, I'm sure it would take another scare before going paste the other label that has the price tag.

Fazor
2007-Jul-11, 05:21 PM
I read the first line (of your post) and assumed they wanted to label people by their country of origin. Products? What's wrong with that? I [redneck-adjective]-well want to know where the things I'm buying are coming from. Currently, many countries first ship their products to Mexico or Canada, so they can say "Imported from Canada" (or, obviously Mexico in that case). That doesn't tell me where it's made, just how it entered the States.

Just as an aside, the article ended with this paragraph:

The Consumer Reports study found 86 percent of those surveyed expect the “natural” label to mean that processed foods do not contain artificial ingredients. Still, the group said many manufacturers call their products natural foods even though they contain artificial sugars and oils.

Aside from it being a question on the same survey, it seemed odd how they just tacked this unrelated gem of information to the end. Like there was some word-count requirement that they couldn't meet with the main story.

Gillianren
2007-Jul-11, 07:34 PM
I will say that I'm more supportive of country-of-origins lately than I would have been even just a couple of months ago; I really want to know if my purchases originate in China.

Fazor
2007-Jul-12, 05:48 PM
I will say that I'm more supportive of country-of-origins lately than I would have been even just a couple of months ago; I really want to know if my purchases originate in China.

What, you don't like tastey treats such as these (http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/07/12/cardboard.food.ap/index.html)?


BEIJING, China (AP) -- Chopped cardboard, softened with an industrial chemical and flavored with fatty pork and powdered seasoning, is a main ingredient in batches of steamed buns sold in one Beijing neighborhood, state television said.

Yum. :sick:

Peter Wilson
2007-Jul-12, 11:13 PM
Muscular young men are likely to have more sex partners than their less-chiseled peers, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles said on Monday.

Are they sure muscular young men can count?

:razz:

Lurker
2007-Jul-12, 11:15 PM
Are they sure muscular young men can count?

:razz:
hmmmmm.... this could be a real flaw in the study design... :think:

Van Rijn
2007-Jul-13, 12:48 AM
What, you don't like tastey treats such as these (http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/07/12/cardboard.food.ap/index.html)?

Yum. :sick:

Well, it's just roughage. :) Actually, while I'm not impressed with their method of production, it occurs that there might not be that much difference between different sources of cellulose in the diet, as long as safety practices are followed.

Maksutov
2007-Jul-13, 09:45 AM
The introduction of high fructose corn syrup into 85% of everything you eat
has been a contributor to the fat problem. It is a national and scientific disgrace. Powerfull interests are making money.
Arm yourself with education and the hard work of making better decisions when you eat and what you eat, and "WHERE" you eat. And....the exercise is a good thing.
Best regards, DanYou're missing the impact of the presence of dihydrogen monoxide (http://www.dhmo.org/) as a major component in almost all our foods.

Insidious.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-07, 03:44 PM
A new study says that how we choose our friends is strongly influenced by genetic factors (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20149020/site/newsweek/)

I understand that they are distinguishing this from the environment, but what is to distinguish this from the "people like me" factor?

The Backroad Astronomer
2007-Aug-08, 04:02 AM
Muscular young men are likely to have more sex partners than their less-chiseled peers, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles said on Monday.
Its not quanity but quality.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-23, 01:16 PM
Soccer Burns More Fat Than Jogging (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/13951756/detail.html)


Playing team sports helps people get in shape more quickly than just running, according to new research in Denmark.
[...]
Researchers said it may be because soccer players can focus on their team or other activities, while all runners have to think about is themselves.


Translation...Running=boring, Sports=fun

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-23, 02:09 PM
Some of the inferences, or speculations that resulted from this study are worth following up on. But; without those followups, relying solely on the results here, it sounds rather DUH.

Gastric Bypass Lowers Risk of Death (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1655367,00.html)


Studies have shown that after surgery, patients often lose 50% or more of their excess weight — and keep it off

Which is why they have the surgery. They have exhasted other forms.

and symptoms of obesity-related conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and sleep apnea are improved or eliminated altogether. Now, two new studies in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) show another long-term benefit: a lower risk of death.
Which is most likely due to lower incidences of diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesteral. Which is exactly what they say farther down in the article.


Results like these have got some doctors intrigued enough to start thinking about bariatric surgery as a treatment for conditions other than obesity —especially diabetes
Ok; I understand maybe studying this, but what makes them think there is more than the obesity connection here?


The interesting thing is that the resolution of diabetes happens within a few weeks following surgery, long before patients have lost their weight.
Never mind, this may be the connection, but what's to say that the sudden change in the rate of absortion doesn't do it?


The second study [...] Ten years after surgery, researchers report, the bariatric surgery patients had lost more weight and had a 24% lower risk of death than the comparison group. [...] after 10 years, bypass patients had maintained a 25% weight loss, compared to a 16% loss in patients who had stomach stapling, and 14% in those who underwent a banding procedure.
But not compared to non-surgical procedures?


but an interesting finding in the Utah study shows that these patients were 58% more likely to die from other causes, such as suicide and accidents
So; people who don't die one way are likely to die another way?

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-23, 03:18 PM
It's got to be a slow news day...
Besides the various sex studies that are out (I really don't care how much a 70 year old has sex)
This one gave me a chuckle...
Asking for a Raise? Read This First (http://blog.newsweek.com/blogs/labnotes/archive/2007/08/21/asking-for-a-raise-read-this-first.aspx)


Advice: if you’re going to ask the boss for a raise, wait til she’s in a good mood. But don’t do anything that will let her know you know she’s in a good mood.

But what about if you don't know if she doesn't know that you don't know, that she knows, she is in a good mood? You know?

Lurker
2007-Aug-23, 04:46 PM
Really? You don't think some people can't make the choice of activity over inactivity?
There are some who can't, but I think the question is should it be the government's responsibility to make sure that these people adjust their lifestyles to accomodate their level of activity.

This is why I find the government's ban on trans fatty acids so amusing. If there is a requirement that foods be labeled as containing them, people have the choice to avoid them. If people chose not to, it should be up to them.

Nicolas
2007-Aug-31, 12:48 PM
Sorry if it has been covered already, but I couldn't make sense out of these study results:

-they investigated heterosexual couples who were a couple from before their first child to after their last child, all clear here.
-women who had a partner 4 year older on average had the most children. Clear.
-men who had a partner 6 years younger on average had the most children. If the results are statistically significant, how is that possible given the previous conclusion??

I seriously doubt the statistical significance of the results anyway, since they are talking about a 0.1 child difference. This means a variance of less than +- 0.05 children, which would mean a very large amount of couples given the spread in number of children people get.

The only way I can possibly make sense out of the results is that for the women they investigated, their men had children in other relationships before or after this relationship and vice versa. In which case the investigation results still are quite rubish, and they'd better investigated the relationship between age differences and number of relationships, or the relation between number of relationships and number of children per relationship :).

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-31, 01:39 PM
Sorry if it has been covered already, but I couldn't make sense out of these study results:
I don't recall that one, but there was one recently that sounded strange in the same way.
Men had more sexual partners than women on average (by a very wide margin).
Now; unless men are much more homosexual than women, I can not understand how any average can be anything but 50-50.

Delvo
2007-Aug-31, 03:02 PM
That last one's easy. It was a survey. ;)

(Also, there are slightly more women than men, and the study might have excluded virgins or excluded certain ages or something like that.)

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-31, 03:17 PM
That last one's easy. It was a survey. ;)
Exactly my point... My conclusion was how much more a man will exaggerate.

Delvo
2007-Aug-31, 04:13 PM
...or how much more a woman will in the other direction.

NEOWatcher
2007-Aug-31, 04:16 PM
...or how much more a woman will in the other direction.
Touche http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/sportlich/a010.gif

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-19, 05:05 PM
Nutritionists: Soda making Americans drink themselves fat (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/diet.fitness/09/18/kd.liquid.calories/index.html)

Guess what? Sodas that are sweetened with sugars have calories. :eek:



Jacobson said the CSPI [Center for Science in the Public Interest] is pushing to require obesity (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/obesity) warning labels on the sides of soda cans, like the surgeon general's warning on cigarettes.

I guess that top line of the nutrition information labeled "calories" with a number next to it means nothing?


"Soup is the anomaly to the liquid calorie research," he said. "People perceive soup as a meal, unlike drinking a Coke. So when we've done these types of studies, but used soup as the liquid, we don't see the same differences in [appetite] response."
Does anybody know of a good recipe for a sugar based soup?

Fazor
2007-Sep-26, 03:06 PM
Well, the headline basically says it all, but I'll post the link and a quote as a formality:
Study: Steroids Could Significantly Increase Home Runs for Professional Players (http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/09/a-little-more-m.html)

A Tufts physicist and baseball fan will publish an article in the upcoming issue of the American Journal of Physics detailing how a small increase in muscle mass could increase the amount of home runs a professional-baseball-level player would hit by over 50 percent.

Okay so I guess the point is to show just how little a change can make such a big difference.

Wait, no I think the point is this guy wants to get his name out there by leeching onto a popular news media subject. ;)

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-26, 03:18 PM
Okay so I guess the point is to show just how little a change can make such a big difference.
I would give that benefit of the doubt... but...


Wait, no I think the point is this guy wants to get his name out there by leeching onto a popular news media subject. ;)
Why is the study focusing so tightly on this one ability?

I wouldn't mind if they studied power vs muscle mass vs overall drug effects, or something like that.

Or; maybe it's just a math exercise showing how a 4% distance increase changes the distribution to overcome that "fence".

No matter what... it's an ho-hum made stupid by the media (IMO).

Fazor
2007-Sep-26, 03:26 PM
No matter what... it's an ho-hum made stupid by the media (IMO).
Agreed. But if it's a simple math excersize, why is he publishing it to begin with? But isn't that the whole point of this thread? :)

NEOWatcher
2007-Sep-28, 05:25 PM
The big story here, is not that there was a poll and it reveals nothing, but that they are reporting that it means nothing.

The Web: Just another way to avoid sex, friends (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20999608/)

Recently-released poll results about Internet use don't tell us anything new

So viva la distraction, or whatever. Just like the Boyfriend of GGG Girlfriend would’ have been a perverted jerk even if Al Gore never invented binary code or whatever. If it wasn’t the Internet, we’d find some other reason to avoid our friends and sex.

And; you have to go past the anecdotal garbage to get to the story.

KaiYeves
2007-Sep-29, 12:57 AM
But the Internet, as an epherial thing, is, as a plus, immune to physical damage. They can't burn it as they burned Alexandria.

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-01, 07:57 PM
Teens' reaction after first cigarette puff is key (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21081664/)


CHICAGO - Teenagers who feel relaxed after their first drags on a cigarette are most likely to become addicted to smoking, a sign that some people's brains are more susceptible to nicotine, researchers said on Monday.


Translation... those that like it the most are most likely to be addicted.

KaiYeves
2007-Oct-01, 08:25 PM
Translation... those that like it the most are most likely to be addicted.
Did those reporters ever take seventh-grade health. I was unlucky enough to have it before lunch.
Since then, my mantra has been- School should be just for studying academics.

Whirlpool
2007-Oct-02, 09:39 AM
I had my first try of cigarette when I was in my freshman in high school.

And after tasting it , I swear to never try and smoke again ever.

:sick:

The_Radiation_Specialist
2007-Oct-02, 09:46 AM
I had my first try of cigarette when I was in my freshman in high school.

And after tasting it , I swear to never try and smoke again ever.

:sick:

Maybe because you had it the wrong way?

:D

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-02, 12:05 PM
I had my first try of cigarette when I was in my freshman in high school.

And after tasting it , I swear to never try and smoke again ever.
:sick:
Did you swallow?

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-02, 02:05 PM
Is your credit card making you fat? (http://www.wkyc.com/news/national/news_article.aspx?storyid=75308)


There is new concern that using credit cards is helping fast-food customers pack on the pounds.
...
According to a study from Visa, fast-food customers who pay with plastic spend 30 percent more than those who pay with cash.



Uh, could it just be possible that it's the people who spend more tend to use credit cards? :hand:

Fazor
2007-Oct-02, 03:55 PM
Is your credit card making you fat? (http://www.wkyc.com/news/national/news_article.aspx?storyid=75308)


Uh, could it just be possible that it's the people who spend more tend to use credit cards? :hand:

No, no no. That's crazy talk. Obviously, big corporations are to blame for America's eating habits. It's Ronald and Visa's fault that I'm overweight...it has nothing to do with the fact that lately I've been too lazy to clean my kitchen, therefore unable to make a home-cooked meal. If only there was something I could do, but how am I as an individual suppose to fight the huge evil corporations?! :)

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-02, 04:46 PM
No, no no. That's crazy talk. Obviously, big corporations are to blame for America's eating habits...
No, no, it has to be the Chinese. Don't they make paper?

Studies show that food wrapped with paper have more calories than food not wrapped in paper. Obviously, the paper is introducing calories into the food.

Fazor
2007-Oct-02, 04:48 PM
It's soo obvious! How did I miss that? I'll be back in a bit--have to make sure the 6 o'clock news runs a segment informing people to pick plastic at the grocery store instead of paper, or else home-cooked food will be just as calorie-loaded.

Whirlpool
2007-Oct-03, 05:42 AM
I think paper-wrapped food is more safe that plastic.


:think:

Neverfly
2007-Oct-03, 05:47 AM
I think paper-wrapped food is more safe that plastic.


:think:

I think he was referring to the bags...

NEOWatcher
2007-Oct-03, 01:50 PM
I think paper-wrapped food is more safe that plastic.
:think:

Sigh... I guess I need to explain the joke. (At least Fazor seems to have got it)

Fattening foods are often bought at fast food joints and are usually wrapped in paper. (sometimes even to soak up the fat)
Healthier foods are often bought bare, or packaged in other ways...

Fazor
2007-Oct-03, 02:38 PM
Pointing out irrelevant correlations in studies is one of my favorite pass-times, so of course I got it. :)

Whirlpool
2007-Oct-04, 01:54 AM
Oh. I got it.


What's that again ? :think:



:p

NEOWatcher
2007-Dec-14, 01:59 PM
Study: Students Who Pull All-Nighters Have Lower GPAs (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,316796,00.html)



A survey of 120 students at St. Lawrence University, a small liberal arts college in northern New York,

Ok, so among liberal arts students. What about other disciplines? Or are the liberal arts students the ones that need to learn this?



Many college students, of course, have inadequate or irregular sleep, for reasons ranging from excessive caffeine to poor time management.

Which is probably more prevelent in students with lower GPA's.

Fazor
2007-Dec-14, 06:55 PM
I'd be willing to bet that the greater majority of students pulling "all-nighters", or last minute study sessions, are doing so because they did not study in the prior days, weeks, and/or months. To me, this suggests that students with poor study habits get lower grades than those with better study habits. (what a shocker!)

However, I won't argue that poor sleep and diet habits also have an adverse effect on mental performance. I don't think I've ever heard anyone argue that sleep isn't necessary, or that lack of sleep does not cause problems. But if this study proves that point, it's only a part of the larger cause for the poor(er) grades.

NEOWatcher
2007-Dec-20, 03:09 PM
There may be some good information in this, but the overall message is kinda like "DUH".

Cancer quicker to claim the uninsured (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22332573/)

I'm pretty sure that the situation is not limited to cancer.



according to the first national study of its kind and one that sheds light on troubling health care obstacles
...
Earlier studies have also shown differences in cancer survival rates of the uninsured and insured, but they were limited to specific cancers and certain geographic areas.

"First of it's kind" is stretching it IMO.



Those dealing with cancer and inadequate insurance weren’t surprised by the findings.

I would like to know who is surprised by the findings.


“The truth is that our national reluctance to face these facts is condemning thousands of people to die from cancer each year,” Dr. Elmer Huerta wrote.
Is it that they are not facing the facts, or that they just haven't figured out a good solution that addresses all the concerns?

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-03, 04:51 PM
Free drug samples go to wealthy and insured (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22486745/)

Who said that the samples are meant for needy people?

The drug companies also have drug assistance programs which are meant for the needy.

2 completely different things.

Now; is the balance between them fair? that's also a different issue.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Jan-03, 08:32 PM
Free drug samples go to wealthy and insured (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22486745/)
Well duh!
The samples are part of marketing, marketing is interested in paying customers.

Gillianren
2008-Jan-03, 08:37 PM
My first psychiatrist gave me drug samples when he could. I know they're intended to drum up business, but since I think medical coverage in this country is completely mismanaged, I'm all for giving the samples to people who need them.

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-08, 05:16 PM
Study: Chronic worrying increases your odds of a heart attack (http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=80963)



Doctors say the research is important because patients are usually treated for the physical factors leading to heart trouble, but not the psychological ones. They say physicians need to be aggressive about "really getting into their patients' heads."

Um, if it's that bad, shouldn't that person seek psychological help wether its related to heart disease or not?

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-08, 06:31 PM
Healthy Habits Can Mean 14 Extra Years (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1701330,00.html)

First: people who adopted these four healthy habits lived an average of 14 years longer than those who didn't.
Later: "We can't say that any one person could gain 14 years by doing these things,"
The definition of average?

Public health experts said they hoped the study would inspire governments to introduce policies helping people to adopt these changes.
WE NEED LAWS!!!! :rolleyes:

Experts are also unsure if these new findings will actually improve the public's health.
"What stops people from changing their behavior is not a lack of knowledge," Jebb said.
Well; it really depends on the person, but I think he's on to something

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-09, 04:57 PM
Key to longer life? Exercise ... and a little booze (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22571032/)
Couch potato teetotalers have higher risk of heart disease, new study finds.


But the Danish study, one of the largest of its kind to examine the combined effect of drinking and exercise, found there were additional protective effects gained from doing both.

So two good things may actually be better than one?

Gillianren
2008-Jan-09, 08:02 PM
Just be careful about combining the two. Skiing while drunk, for example, is not a smart idea.

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-09, 08:05 PM
Just be careful about combining the two. Skiing while drunk, for example, is not a smart idea.
Aha, that explains it. The risk is lower for heart disease because they already died in a horrible and embarrasing accident.

Fazor
2008-Jan-09, 08:52 PM
Aha, that explains it. The risk is lower for heart disease because they already died in a horrible and embarrasing accident.
Exactly! Can't argue with results!
Infact...if we set up a system where once someone is born, we kill them, we'll reduce cancer deaths 100%!
Genius!

NEOWatcher
2008-Jan-31, 04:58 PM
Investors Favor Companies With Likable Commercials (http://www.newsnet5.com/money/15183819/detail.html)


According to a new study, when television viewers like a company's Super Bowl commercial that company's stock price goes up.
...
In other words, these investors are making a decision to buy stock based on a TV commercial they liked, instead of on the firm's long-term value.

Sure, there may be...but maybe, just maybe... some investors see the comercial as a boost in sales, which will make the stock a good value. So, maybe there's an investment type reason to it?

NEOWatcher
2008-Feb-11, 04:52 PM
Where do we begin on this one...
Some breast cancer Web sites inaccurate (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23109464/)



WASHINGTON - Five percent of breast cancer Web sites have mistakes, with those involving alternative or complementary medicine the most likely to be misleading, U.S. researchers reported on Monday.



No combination of the criteria allowed us to differentiate the Web sites with accurate information versus those that did not."

Selling you a cure might be one that eliminates many.

Gillianren
2008-Feb-11, 06:59 PM
My doctors are always encouraging me to research online, saying, "Well, you know what you're doing with the internet; why don't you do this more?" And my answer, of course, is that, because I know what I'm doing with the internet, I know that you can't trust a lot of what you read on it. Especially about any kind of chronic condition without a cure--or, of course, a potentially lethal illness. Either one of those makes a lot of people desperate and therefore vulnerable.

NEOWatcher
2008-Mar-27, 05:21 PM
Ahh yes, the advertising campaign induced studies... Usually quite accurate and un-biased (NOT).

Tanning Salons Fight Skin Cancer 'Hype' (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/15721995/detail.html)


The Indoor Tanning Association said that it plans a nationwide campaign, including ads in major newspapers, to promote research that shows UV rays stimulate the body to produce vitamin D, which can protect against heart disease and other types of cancer.


At least the reporter did a bit of digging...

The American Academy of Dermatology (http://www.aad.org/) agreed that vitamin D is essential, but said it can be obtained through healthy diet.

And about that leathery skin...


The ITA also attacked those who warn about skin damage from UV rays.

Attacked them how? With knives? Did they attack because they don't want people to warn about the danger?

Gillianren
2008-Mar-27, 05:40 PM
I worked at a job with a handful of women who used tanning salons, and they would occasionally ask why I didn't. Leaving aside the fact that I simply don't tan, my answer was generally, "Skin cancer." It was as though they'd never thought about it--and they stopped again almost immediately, too.

NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-08, 07:01 PM
Shopping in lousy mood will cost you (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24013927/)

I have no doubt that this is true, but this study is garbage...


Participants who had watched a sad video clip offered more than three times as much for a water bottle than those who viewed a neutral clip from a documentary.

That only proves they were thirstier. Maybe they cried more and lost moisture?

NEOWatcher
2008-Apr-09, 04:12 PM
Seven or more eggs are bad (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24028358/)

Oh wow, this one has some doozies in it.
1) The cliche of an increased risk of death as many do.
2)
"Whereas egg consumption of up to six eggs a week was not associated with the risk of all-cause mortality, consumption of (seven or more) eggs a week was associated with a 23 percent greater risk of death," they wrote.
What about 7 small eggs, or 6 jumbo eggs? Interesting way to draw a line with such a drastic change in risk.
3)

"... if you're a middle-aged male physician and enjoy eggs more than once a day, that having some of the egg left on your face may be better than having it go down your gullet,"
a) what?
b) A study only of people who are keenly aware of health issues?

4)


"Egg consumption was not associated with (heart attack) or stroke," the researchers wrote.
But the men who ate seven eggs a week or more were 23 percent more likely to have died during the 20-year period.

So what were they associated with?
5)

Men who ate the most eggs also were older, fatter, ate more vegetables but less breakfast cereal, and were more likely to drink alcohol, smoke and less likely to exercise
So, it's not really the eggs, is it?

NEOWatcher
2008-Jun-19, 04:48 PM
Guess what, sex sells... I would have never guessed.:rolleyes:

Science proves that bikinis turn men into boobs (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25197962/)



a paper titled “Bikinis Instigate Generalized Impatience in Intertemporal Choice,” which is a neuroeconomist’s (definition in a moment) way of saying that men don’t make good decisions while checking out pretty girls in bikinis.

At least they used a few big words.

And; to make matters worse, they needed to include the description of a study called "Heat of the Moment: The Effect of Sexual Arousal on Sexual Decision Making.". I'll avoid the details on that one.

Now; what about women?

Whether or not women are as blinded by sex as men remains an open question. Would a picture of David Beckham in briefs influence a woman to pass up a bigger payout? Maybe, but the studies on sexual arousal and decision-making have mostly been done on men, so the verdict is out.

It's amazing what a researcher will do for porn.

Gillianren
2008-Jun-19, 04:56 PM
Do you know, I can't even picture what David Beckham looks like?

Lianachan
2008-Jun-19, 05:15 PM
Do you know, I can't even picture what David Beckham looks like?

It's alright for some! Luckily, we've not been subjected to him nearly as much in recent months, but he was one of those people that the English media (to which we up here are subjected) really latched onto and idolised, for years.

Delvo
2008-Jun-20, 02:46 AM
A classic example of the sexism against men that modern "psychology" has mutated into...
In each test, the researchers offered the men the choice between being paid 15 euros immediately or bargaining for a larger sum that they'd be willing to wait a week or a month for.This is touted as a test of how well one's brain is functioning and thus proof of stupidity and loss of brain function. Gewd gawd.

tdvance
2008-Jun-20, 05:29 PM
no details given, but choosing the 15 now could easily be the smart choice--given that the probability of actually receiving the dough is likely higher for the 15 than for the other (unless they give some really strong assurance!!!). A bird in the hand is worth two you see on tv, or something like that.

I'd take $15 american today over, say, $45 american that I'd have to come back for next month, given that my schedule might prevent it or i'd come back and the place packed up and left or....
if it's $15 today versus a million in a month, the choice would be different (loss of $15 that I didn't have to begin with being an acceptible risk; not that i'd pay $15 for the million in a month--sounds too likely to be a scam in that case).

NEOWatcher
2008-Aug-01, 04:03 PM
This one can probably go on the "read it again" or "bad reporting" thread, but this thread hasn't been used in a bit.

Apnea Increases Chances Of Dying Sooner (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/17062414/detail.html)

All I can get out of it is that breathing while sleeping really is important to your health.

But the lead in on the main page (http://www.newsnet5.com/index.html) really made me do a double take.

Those who have breathing problems at night are more likely to die over a given time period than those who breathe normally.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Aug-01, 05:29 PM
Those who have breathing problems at night are more likely to die over a given time period than those who breathe normally...
... who will be more likely to die instantaneously?

NEOWatcher
2008-Aug-14, 04:33 PM
Ok; this one actually says something, but this was a good thread to throw it in without starting a new one for a minor point.

MSG may lead to obesity (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/17188708/detail.html)

Of course, I've never been a big fan of going straight from a statistic to a cause and effect.
In this case, I wonder if you can isolate if people prone to weight problems prefering to use MSG.
I'm also assuming this was an uncontrolled sampling.

tdvance
2008-Aug-14, 06:12 PM
Since they are making products that are bad for people I really don't care what happens to them when they have to stop pushing their garbage.


well, candy and potato chips are just fine for most people in moderation, so it's not inherently evil to produce them. Society, in the US at least, has decided to outlaw drugs that have little or no healthy use but keep candy legal even though some would abuse it.

NEOWatcher
2008-Sep-04, 04:19 PM
Using Brain Makes You Hungrier (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/17389052/detail.html)



Researchers had 14 students try one of three activities: sitting and relaxing; reading and summarizing a text; or completing memory and other tests on a computer.

After 45 minutes, they were offered a buffet.

Let me guess, the ones who chose the computer were already overwieght nerds?



He also said that the overcompensation could be part of the obesity epidemic around the world.

Um, yeah...overcompensating for what the body uses overall in any way can be part.

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-07, 04:41 PM
Study: Stress levels skyrocket during Wall Street meltdown (http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/news_article.aspx?storyid=98081&catid=45)

Really? :wall:

Actually it could be a case of bad reporting. This is an annual report, and the article has absolutely no reference to any numbers in the previous years, except that they are "up".

PraedSt
2008-Oct-22, 09:10 PM
This has left me speechless, so I'm leaving it to you Neo:

Eating quickly, and until full, trebles the risk of being overweight (http://www.physorg.com/news143873030.html) :rolleyes:

Nicolas
2008-Oct-22, 09:19 PM
A recent study investigated in a group of people having brain tumors, how many of them used their cell phone a lot. Conclusion: cell phones cause brain tumors.

As bad as it sounds for the health of the population, I'm sure that subsequent research will show that owning dogs, taking showers and exhaling also cause brain tumors. We're all doomed.

How, HOW can anybody get his degree with this kind of nonsense "science"?

(Sorry, no links.)

PraedSt
2008-Oct-23, 02:51 PM
This has left me speechless, so I'm leaving it to you Neo:

I guess Neo was busy!
So some quotes from this study:Eating quickly, and until full, trebles the risk of being overweight (http://www.physorg.com/news143873030.html)


the increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, and fewer families eating together and eating while distracted (e.g. while watching TV), eating behaviours are changing, and this may be contributing to the obesity epidemic

The researchers also found that both men and women in the "eating until full and eating quickly" were three times more likely to be overweight than the participants from the "not eating until full and not eating quickly" group.
And the piece de resistance:

The authors conclude that a combination of eating until full and eating quickly has "a supra-additive effect on overweight"
:doh: Next article: Getting research published improves a scientist's chances of getting grant money. ;)

NEOWatcher
2008-Oct-23, 02:57 PM
I guess Neo was busy!
No; I just had to get my meal down first before responding.

Actually; I thought that one has been done so often that it's actually a cliche.

PraedSt
2008-Oct-23, 03:01 PM
No; I just had to get my meal down first before responding.

Heh. Yeah, it is a bit of a cliche.

mfumbesi
2008-Oct-31, 05:25 AM
I saw a headline this morning and thought Ahh something interesting and new, alas the study says.....nothing.

Here is a linky:http://www.news24.com/News24/Technology/News/0,,2-13-1443_2418584,00.html

Here is the snipets:
Head lines:

European mummy not our daddy
From this I thought the genetic information from that famous mummy has given conclusive results.........no.

More:

Gene scientists delving into the 5 300-year-old remains of Oetzi the Iceman, the mysterious mummified man found high in the Alps, say he most likely has no modern-day relatives.
Wow where did he come from then, he surely had relatives while he was alive...wow the plot thicken.....give me more, give me more.

Sadly thou as you read further you find this:

Richards did not rule out the possibility that the samples of mtDNA from contemporary Europeans had failed to provide a full picture, which meant that Oetzi's lineage could still be around today.

Thank you for wasting my time.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-03, 08:15 PM
...Sadly thou as you read further you find this:
....
Thank you for wasting my time.
I see that in the news a lot. Read an entire story with a lot "could be's" and the final sentence or paragraph says "maybe not"


Here's one from the catagory of "duh".

Anonymous anger rampant on Internet (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/11/03/angry.internet/index.html)



There's a whole world of people out there, and boy, are they ****ed off.
...
This is not a world Emily Post would want to be caught in after dark.


And it must be true because they reference plenty of professors who say so.


"Some people are just bitter and angry," said psychiatrist Dr. Terry Eagan

megrfl
2008-Nov-03, 08:35 PM
I got this from your link:

"In August, The New York Times Magazine did a story about trolls, some barely out of their teens, who antagonize others for the sake of "lulz": "Lulz is watching someone lose their mind at their computer 2,000 miles away while you chat with friends and laugh," one ex-troll told the publication."

Eeehhhh? How is it that you are able to watch someone lose their mind at their computer and who are these people who lose their minds?

Gheez. What people are doing for entertainment?? :doh:

Fazor
2008-Nov-03, 09:16 PM
Classic bully/victim exchange; you only pick on those who will give a responce. The internet is just a way to do in anonymously, allowing people to be more bold than they would in face-to-face environments.

I had the same theory on road rage after noticing how quickly I'm willing to cuse someone out on the road; cars offer unique situations where you're isolated from the other drivers enough to maintain some sense of anonymity, but in close enough proximity to allow for retaliation (in the form of agressive driving, shouting, "hand signals", etc).

The same mechanism possibly responsable for the "internet anger" is probably responsable for road rage. Isolation = sense of embiggenment.

megrfl
2008-Nov-03, 10:30 PM
The same mechanism possibly responsable for the "internet anger" is probably responsable for road rage. Isolation = sense of embiggenment.

Embiggenment, nice word. Sounds like something from the Simpsons'. ;)

Fazor
2008-Nov-04, 12:52 PM
Embiggenment, nice word. Sounds like something from the Simpsons'. ;)
That's exactly where it's from. :)

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-12, 08:27 PM
Americans OK with Democrats in charge, poll suggests (http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/11/one.party.poll/index.html)



In a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Tuesday, 59 percent of those questioned think that Democratic control of both the executive and legislative branches will be good for the country
...
The poll also suggests that the public has a positive view of the Democratic Party, with 62 percent having a favorable opinion and 31 percent an unfavorable opinion.


Maybe we should make that poll a little bigger and compare it to a bigger number of opinions like maybe... gee... I don't know... An election? :wall:

tdvance
2008-Nov-12, 08:40 PM
Reminds me of a poll I just heard mentioned on the radio today--Americans think tax cuts should be delayed in favor of economic recovery. Of course, in the story, the question asked was: "of this list of things, what's most important to you? cutting taxes, economic recovery, etc." and it was 60-something percent put economic recovery first, versus 30-something percent cutting taxes. (and it would be argued that many chose between a goal and a means to the goal).

Fazor
2008-Nov-12, 08:47 PM
Haha NEO. I saw the article earlier and thought the same thing. Was even going to bring it here, but I had a headache and didn't feel like it (needed a break from staring at the screen).

Majority of American's OK with the people who were elected by the majority of Americans! would have been a good article header. Or Most people like the people they voted for.

Don't forget to tune in for tomorrow's ground-breaking economic article entitled Fivolous Spending: Most spend extra cash buying things they want. Or the health article People eat foods they like more than those they don't.

Sports shall be particularly shocking Study finds players tend to play for the teams that pay them.

NEOWatcher
2008-Nov-12, 08:56 PM
Reminds me of a poll I just heard mentioned on the radio today--Americans think tax cuts should be delayed in favor of economic recovery...
Actually; that one tells me a lot. Usually; people are looking for a quick boost and would favor a cut for a little extra spending cash.
But; This tells me they are more worried about thier jobs. What's to cut if there's no tax from no income?

NEOWatcher
2008-Dec-05, 05:21 PM
Anybody out there looking for a positive story among the disasters going around nowadays?

Recession Can Do Wonders For Your Health (http://www.newsnet5.com/health/18049918/detail.html)


In fact, sleep length and quality improve in a downturn. Leisure time -- including vacations -- rises. People spend more time chatting on the phone.

Hey; it's a good thing to be out of work...:rolleyes:

The way I read the article...It says that since you can't afford to do anything or go anywhere, you don't have to worry about accidents and buying vices thus helping physical health.


"We're healthier, but we're not necessarily happier when times are bad," Ruhm said. "The measures of mental health seem to go the opposite way."
Ya think?

Logemann, for example, defined her stress level as medium and said she's spending up to four hours a day looking for jobs to try to replace her income and benefits.
Just in case you didn't believe it could be possible.


And there are no studies to show that long-term unemployment improves health.
So we are talking what? a week off?


While Edwards said he believes the past trends will hold up in the current economic times, Ruhm isn't so sure. He said 2008 may be different than what he studied about the 1970s, '80s and '90s.
So; none of this really matters anyway, right?

Last, but not least, is a suicide death considered a physical or mental health issue?

Neverfly
2008-Dec-05, 05:29 PM
What is all that nonsense.. propaganda?:doh:

Fazor
2008-Dec-05, 05:47 PM
What about the fact that as people lose health benefits and money for health care, what use to be a non-serious medical issue can quickly become serious/life threatening?

For instance, strep throat is something that is common and easily treatable. But if you can't go to the doctor and/or get meds to treat it, it can cause serious long-term health issues or even be fatal. Or, like the nephew of a co-worker, something like a hernia that can be fixed, but if you don't have health insurance it goes untreated until its a serious problem and they have to treat it.

NEOWatcher
2008-Dec-05, 06:05 PM
What about the fact that as people lose health benefits and money for health care...
Maybe that's why they don't have "long term unemployment" numbers.

But; they are only talking about mortality rates, so, I'm sure comas, amputations, and organ removals don't count.

Fazor
2008-Dec-05, 06:17 PM
Ah, yes, the 'ol "Healthy means not dead" defense. Of course.

Honestly, I think there's a game that science departments at schools play called "What irrelevant study can we run that will get us in the paper and make us look like we did something?"

NEOWatcher
2008-Dec-05, 06:26 PM
Honestly, I think there's a game that science departments at schools...
By the way, these are health statistics studied by an economics professor.

So; maybe in the economics world, death is the only thing considered unhealthy. They probably think that as long as you can work, you are healthy.

By the way; I was originally half expecting the story to read "people are healthier because doctor and hospital visits are down".

Fazor
2008-Dec-05, 06:30 PM
By the way; I was originally half expecting the story to read "people are healthier because doctor and hospital visits are down".

Lol; call a doctor's office and ask if visits seem to be down, and if they say "yes" submit that line to the AP; might just get yourself a study credit.

NEOWatcher
2008-Dec-05, 09:09 PM
What is this...It's bad to work day?
Work really may be bad for health, survey says (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28070699/)


The online survey, [...] polled about 115,000 people in 33 countries in Europe, Asia and the Pacific and North America this year.
On average, 19 percent of respondents globally said their job was adversely affecting their health, with an additional 13 percent saying their work was so stressful it was making it hard for them to sleep at night

I wonder if they also asked if they would feel sick to be out of a job. Or maybe counter with a server of non-working people.


"In a tight labor market, employee incentives are also a key tool in recruiting and retaining staff."

And when are we going to be in a tight labor market?

Neverfly
2008-Dec-05, 11:57 PM
What is this...It's bad to work day?
Work really may be bad for health, survey says (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28070699/)

I wonder if they also asked if they would feel sick to be out of a job. Or maybe counter with a server of non-working people.

And when are we going to be in a tight labor market?

I eat bacon.

I work.

My health is probably worse during a recession or depression due to stress.

I'm allergic to stupidity.

tdvance
2008-Dec-06, 04:32 PM
yeah, if work is bad for your health, just quit!!!

Actually, we have the healthiest/safest work ever. Just a couple centuries ago, people worked in match factories, breathed phosphorous fumes, and died an early death, yet those factories still had a waiting list of workers larger than the number of positions available in those tougher economic times. We gripe that times are tough when we don't know what tough is!

NEOWatcher
2008-Dec-15, 05:11 PM
Study: Starting school later gave students extra hour of sleep (http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/12/12/sleep.teenagers.school/index.html)

The article spent considerable time explaining that sleeping in an extra hour helps with the problem of sleepy teenagers.

I kept reading it looking for the obvious "why can't they go to sleep an hour earlier".
I thought I found it here...


Going to bed earlier is not effective, because a teenager's melatonin levels, hypothalamus and internal clock are changing during puberty.
"Teenagers are going through physiological changes that make it physically difficult to fall asleep before 11," Croft said.

Why?

They go on, and it kind of teases you into thinking that it might make sense. Then they make comments like:


Constant text messaging, Web surfing and digital distractions could also be keeping teenagers up into the wee hours of the night.

Which have nothing to do with when you wake up.

Now; I do think that there needs to be more studied, because there sample size was a single county.
Depending on where you are in your time zone, you may already be waking up an hour later than the study (perhaps earlier too).

Not only that, but what about latitude? Nightfall is constantly changing. For example: up here during the school year, it varies somewhere around 4 or five hours difference.

Lastly, the final paragraph:


"You want to make sure it gets results, and you want to look at data," said Patte Barth, director of the Center for Public Education. "When you make the change, it's vitally important to involve the community. It's not just shifting time up. It affects after-school activities, extracurricular activities, jobs -- and parents may have some concerns."

So; now you have to add to the study, "is non-school life affected by doing this?"

Fazor
2008-Dec-15, 06:20 PM
It wasn't that long ago that I was a sleepless teenager. I garuntee if they started school an hour later, I'd just have stayed up an hour later.

The funny thing is; aside from the "I don't want to get up and go to schoool!" during the first hour or so; I was never tired. Teenagers (at least in my experience) just don't need that much sleep.

HenrikOlsen
2008-Dec-15, 07:42 PM
I solved that problem in high school by going to bed when I got home from school, then wake at 8-9 for late dinner, nap, then do studying and stuff during the night, to get to school awake and ready.

Worked wonderfully until my parents started waking me up at weird times during weekends, thus messing up my circadian rhythm.

tdvance
2008-Dec-15, 09:37 PM
Study: Starting school later gave students extra hour of sleep (http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/12/12/sleep.teenagers.school/index.html)

The article spent considerable time explaining that sleeping in an extra hour helps with the problem of sleepy teenagers.

I kept reading it looking for the obvious "why can't they go to sleep an hour earlier".
I thought I found it here...

Why?

They go on, and it kind of teases you into thinking that it might make sense. Then they make comments like:

Which have nothing to do with when you wake up.

Now; I do think that there needs to be more studied, because there sample size was a single county.
Depending on where you are in your time zone, you may already be waking up an hour later than the study (perhaps earlier too).

Not only that, but what about latitude? Nightfall is constantly changing. For example: up here during the school year, it varies somewhere around 4 or five hours difference.

Lastly, the final paragraph:

So; now you have to add to the study, "is non-school life affected by doing this?"

Sounds like the solution is "move all clocks an hour back--permanently"--so kids who can't get to sleep at 10pm will go to sleep at 11pm, and start school effectively an hour earlier.

Why do I have the feeling it won't make any difference...

NEOWatcher
2009-Jan-13, 04:05 PM
Here's one that sounds a little fishy.

A study
-on animals
-for a product that has been in use for over 100 years
-brought to light because of problems during misuse

At least the report points out flaws in the research...
Vicks might make kids sicker (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28628924/)
I have no doubt that a product like this can have adverse affects in some way. I feel that way about any product that battles a physical and a mental affect.

But in over 100 years nobody has researched this?

I probably wouldn't have even noticed this article if it wasn't for this part of the story...


Using lab specimens from ferrets, whose respiratory systems are similar to infants and young kids, [...]. It also decreased the function of cilia, the tiny, hairlike structures that help clear the passages, by 36 percent, the study showed.
In live animals, however, the results weren't as striking.

They used dead animals to check respiratory effects? :eh:

Fazor
2009-Jan-13, 04:14 PM
...interesting. And again, I wonder why I'm not considered qualified to head scientific experiments. :)

"A recent study showed that after using Crest toothpaste twice a day on 30 iguannas, they were unable to breathe and failed to have a heart beat. Results weren't so dire when toothpaste was used on living iguannas."

tdvance
2009-Jan-13, 11:09 PM
Sounds like they used petri-dish tissues--it proves something, I'm not sure what though.

mugaliens
2009-Jan-13, 11:20 PM
So; now you have to add to the study, "is non-school life affected by doing this?"

When I was in school, it was reading late at night. I'd get so engrossed in a book I'd stay up until 1am. These days, it's BAUT, not a book.

(sigh) Not much has changed...

NEOWatcher
2009-Jan-27, 07:41 PM
No kidding! Bad jokes result in real social harm (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28874103/)


New research found that failed attempts at humor can provoke surprisingly rude responses, with the harshest reactions coming from friends and family.

Well; duh....

responding with phrases ranging from the mild, "That’s not funny," all the way to downright offensive and profane retorts. And the worst offenders were close friends and relatives of the bad-joke teller.


When a joke is actually funny, listeners don't mind the disruption because there is a payoff: humor.

Fazor
2009-Jan-27, 08:05 PM
New research found that failed attempts at humor can provoke surprisingly rude responses, with the harshest reactions coming from friends and family.
Uhm... all they really had to do is ask me. I'm happy guestimating my humor has a 50% success rate. I think that's over-estimating it though. :)

tdvance
2009-Jan-27, 08:13 PM
what seems "harsh" from outside the family is bonding from within, I think! That's why if dad tells a bad one, I would exaggerate the badness of the joke. Only within families or friendships can one do this without it being rude! (pity the poor fool who tries to act too familiar with a stranger in that regard!!!) Actually, within the family, "that's not funny" is more serious than an exaggerated insult, and therefore not as friendly! Gotta respond to a joke in a joking manner.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jan-29, 05:01 PM
Study: Want more milk from cow? Get to know her (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/01/29/happy.cows.milk/index.html)



The researchers found that farmers who named their cows Betsy or Gertrude or Daisy improved their overall milk yield by almost 500 pints (284 liters) annually.

And the improvement represents a sample size of what? They say 516 farmers, but what is that in pints?

My guess is that the personality the farmer has to name the cow, is also a personality that tends to be more careful during the milking process.

Fazor
2009-Jan-29, 05:13 PM
Or that farmers tend to name their better-producing cows because they're, well, better producing. Or that cows tend to be named by farmers with fewer cows that still are milked by hand rather than farms with hundreds of cows that use milking machines. Etc etc.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jan-29, 05:16 PM
...Or that cows tend to be named by farmers with fewer cows that still are milked by hand rather than farms with hundreds of cows that use milking machines. Etc etc.
That's what I was thinking along the lines of, but couldn't think of some possible examples.

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-19, 06:18 PM
If this study found any other results, then one could probably ask "how did evolution actually happen"

Men see bikini-clad women as objects, psychologists say (http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/19/women.bikinis.objects/index.html)
And now to open it with a (most likely intentional) double entendre:


in men, the brain areas associated with handling tools and the intention to perform actions light up when viewing images of women in bikinis.

Some great quotes in this one.


They're not fully conscious responses...

Men also remember these women's bodies better than those of fully-clothed women...



The findings are consistent with previous work in the field, and resonate, for example, with the abundance of female strip clubs in comparison to male strip clubs
Now theres some interesting filed field studies.

This study looked specifically at men, and did not test women's responses to similar images.
Women's responses to bikini clad women?

Oh; and just to show that it is a good cross sectional sample of all males...


The participants, 21 heterosexual male undergraduates

Fazor
2009-Feb-19, 06:33 PM
Heh. Sounds like just an excuses to go to some skin bars.

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-19, 06:49 PM
Heh. Sounds like just an excuses to go to some skin bars.
I thought I said that, but it appears to be a typo... I did mean Field Studies in the one comment. :doh:

Gillianren
2009-Feb-19, 07:42 PM
I can assure you that women are certainly willing to look at scantily-clad men (and lesbians at scantily-clad women, of course!), hence the popularity of Chippendale dancers. Women don't go to strip clubs as often, but there are still women who do it. So far as I can tell, women are just as capable of objectifying men. We're just (usually) quieter about it.

SeanF
2009-Feb-19, 07:56 PM
Women don't go to strip clubs as often, but there are still women who do it. So far as I can tell, women are just as capable of objectifying men. We're just (usually) quieter about it.
I once saw a film that contrasted footage of women at male strip shows with footage of men at female strip shows. I can assure you that "quieter" is one thing the women were not! :)

Fazor
2009-Feb-19, 07:57 PM
We're just (usually) quieter about it.
Until you get in a group. I'll tell you, between the two, it's been my experience that a group of women are much more... "objectifying" ... than a group of men.

But that could just be based on who I hang out with. If I had to make a rational guess, I'd say men and women are probably fairly equal in that department.

Gillianren
2009-Feb-19, 10:09 PM
I once saw a film that contrasted footage of women at male strip shows with footage of men at female strip shows. I can assure you that "quieter" is one thing the women were not! :)

I'm just saying you're less likely to get women whistling at men walking down the street. (Of course, that's not saying it never happens.)

sarongsong
2009-Feb-20, 12:57 AM
...Some great quotes in this one.
in men, the brain areas associated with handling tools and the intention to perform actions light up when viewing images of women in bikinis.Well that explains the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue! :)

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-23, 05:23 PM
Cancer patients who do research get newest drugs (http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-02-23-cancer-patients-drugs_N.htm)


Cancer patients who research treatment options are three times more likely to get the newest drugs than patients who don't spend extra time learning about their condition

Ok; I was half expecting some minor correlation, but 3x is a considerable ratio, so I continued reading.
It sounded reasonable. People looked into it and asked about it. The first doctor didn't prescribe it because he didn't know much about it. So; the person went to get a second opinion from somebody who knows it, and is therefore equipped to prescribe it.

Then I came to the end...

But one in four people who received the drugs got them "off label" for early cancer, an unapproved use.
So; only those willing to risk almost anything are the ones looking for new ways...

It relied on patients' memories of how they learned about treatment options...
Thus; a natural skewing of the data as described in the article.

And;

Also, people may say they did lots of research just because it sounds like the responsible thing to do, she says.
So research based on lies or ego is still a possibility.

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-24, 06:44 PM
Too much PlayStation may cause painful lumps (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29369122/) :rolleyes:


Keeping too tight a grip on the console and furiously pushing the buttons can cause a newly identified skin disorder marked by painful lumps on the palms...
Called "PlayStation palmar hidradentitis"

What I would like to know is what makes this unique to PS that is not applicable to grasping anything repeatedly?

I've had lesions and blisters on my palms, and have never played a PS more than a few minutes...:wall:

I wouldn't be concerned so much about the lesions as I would worry about what compelled someone to not realize that they should stop because it's starting to hurt.

Fazor
2009-Feb-24, 06:57 PM
My palms would hurt from using the new playstation controller too; but mostly from wringing my hands trying to figure out a way to justify spending all that money on the system. :)

Oh, and talk about torn up hands; my brother was a gymnist. I'll still make fun of him to this day for it; but just because he's my younger brother. Their hands were always disgusting. Layers upon layers of dead, hardened skin over oozing, bleeding blisters. The high-bar and rings really did a number on 'em.

NEOWatcher
2009-Feb-25, 09:30 PM
Oh, and talk about torn up hands; my brother was a gymnist...
Rips, ouch.

I'll still make fun of him to this day for it...
Some of them, I wouldn't want to run across in a dark alley. They usually have muscles where we wouldn't expect.
I've been involved with gymnastics all my life. Never any good, but have aches where you wouldn't expect.

Fazor
2009-Feb-25, 10:17 PM
Oh, he and his team-mates were ripped (he hasn't done it for years), but gynists are also usually short. I was never afraid of fighting him (plus, like I said, he's my younger brother).

And yes, 'rips'. Thanks, I had forgotten what the term was.

I never did gymnastics, but I think I have super-human hands anyway. No matter what I do, the skin stays soft and girlie :rolleyes: I play guitar (acoustic, mostly) for at least an hour a night but I don't get calouses on my fingers...which is bad because they help. Oh well.

NEOWatcher
2009-Mar-02, 06:58 PM
'Eat your vegetables': For kids, it means fries (http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/news_article.aspx?storyid=108392&catid=45)


Kids aren't eating enough fruits and vegetables, and when they do consume produce, they are more likely to eat french fries than nutrient-rich dark green or orange vegetables, a study shows.

No other comment from me...

But, this one...
Survey: Most Unaware Of Credit Card Changes (http://www.newsnet5.com/money/18831300/detail.html)
...is a good example of how you phrase the question determines the result.


more than 66 percent of people who responded said they didn't know what, if any, changes their credit card companies have made.
To that, they draw the following conclusion...

Adam Levin said a great deal of the subprime mortgage disaster has to do with consumers not understanding what they've agreed to.
I'm sure there are plenty of people in that boat. I think that for many it's not that they don't understand what they've agreed to as much as it's that they can't do much, if anything about it.
Plus, I'm sure if you asked them right after a change, they would probably answer that question with a complete editorial.

Gillianren
2009-Mar-02, 08:11 PM
Plus, I'm sure if you asked them right after a change, they would probably answer that question with a complete editorial.

I'm not sure about that. I used to take credit card applications over the phone, and sometimes, I would have to read this enormously long contract statement. (It depended on the call; if you were calling based on an application you'd received in the mail, the statement came with it and I didn't have to read it. If you heard about the card from some other source, I had to read the whole blasted thing.) The thing was maybe two or three computer screens long, albeit without some of them being full screens. One of the sentences declared that the terms of the card were subject to change, and you'd be amazed how many people were stunned by that information, despite the fact that it had been true of the credit cards they'd had before, too. They'd tell me that it wasn't true, but that's standard on credit cards. I could tell you all sorts of stories about how ignorant people are of their own credit.

tdvance
2009-Mar-02, 08:31 PM
'Eat your vegetables': For kids, it means fries (http://www.wkyc.com/news/local/news_article.aspx?storyid=108392&catid=45)

No other comment from me...

But, this one...
Survey: Most Unaware Of Credit Card Changes (http://www.newsnet5.com/money/18831300/detail.html)
...is a good example of how you phrase the question determines the result.


To that, they draw the following conclusion...

I'm sure there are plenty of people in that boat. I think that for many it's not that they don't understand what they've agreed to as much as it's that they can't do much, if anything about it.
Plus, I'm sure if you asked them right after a change, they would probably answer that question with a complete editorial.


Oh, I get those "change of credit terms" notices. They are a novella's worth (only exaggerating a little) of text in tiny print, and the "delta" is not highlighted, so you can't exactly see if, say, the change was a single sentence changing. Yes, I'm guilty--I don't read them.

tdvance
2009-Mar-02, 08:34 PM
oh, and as a kid, I always interpreted "eat your vegetables" as eat more fries. Hey, potatoes are not animals, not mineral, so must be vegetable! I was annoyed in French class when we learned the new word "Legume", translated simply as "vegetable", and he asked us to say, in French, "my favorite vegetable is ..." and I said "... pomme frittes" and the teacher said, "no, Legume only means 'green vegetables'"---doh! But I so love fried apples...er French Fries.

NEOWatcher
2009-Mar-02, 09:12 PM
I'm not sure about that...
Could be, I'm going by gut feel. But; the way that the question comes across, it doesn't prove that point.

I know my CC changes, I've read the small print (not thoroughly mostly, but I do scan for the major gotchas).
When it changes, I can't do much about it anyway, and it's usually in line with industry standards. But; I'm also in a good enough position that it's not going to effect me much either. So, I would probably answer "no changes" in a survey myself.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-03, 03:25 PM
Another perchlorate scare...

Rocket fuel chemical found in baby formula (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30028134/)

Here's the key eye rolling statement:


Traces of a chemical used in rocket fuel were found in samples of powdered baby formula, and could exceed what's considered a safe dose for adults if mixed with water also contaminated with the ingredient, a government study has found.

I read that as "It's bad if you put bad stuff in it". :doh:

But; they don't say what kinds of levels they are at. It also talks about the requirement of Iodine to counteract it, but never say the level of it in the tests.

Then, the next confusing statement:

No tests have ever shown the chemical caused health problems, but scientists have said significant amounts of perchlorate can affect thyroid function.
Scientists are saying that without any tests?:think:

And now the findings...

The study itself sheds little light on how dangerous the perchlorate in baby formula is.

Fazor
2009-Apr-03, 03:37 PM
People get paid to do this kind of thing. Amazing.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-23, 04:09 PM
Chewing gum may help teens crunch numbers (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30355217/)


But a team led by Craig Johnston at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston found that students who chewed gum during math class had higher scores on a standardized math test after 14 weeks and better grades at the end of the term than students in the class who did not chew gum.

But; even the article points out that this is a one-off effect. Chewing gum reduces stress, and reduced stress helps grades.

What it doesn't address is how many people really do get reduced stress by chewing gum, and how does it compare to other stress reducing methods.

Were the non-chewers normally non-chewers, and chewers normally chewers? That's gonna change things quite a bit.

Oh; by the way, the entire explaination is this:

The study was funded by chewing gum maker Wrigley.

Fazor
2009-Apr-23, 04:34 PM
Of course, there's the option that instead of making chewer's scores better, it made non-chewers scores lower because they were ticked-off and distracted by the annoying sound of students chewing gum.

Sloppy, smacky chewing is one of my biggest pet peeves; to the point of having to seriously suppress homicidal tendencies. That makes it hard to concentrate on academics.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-23, 05:09 PM
Of course, there's the option that instead of making chewer's scores better, it made non-chewers scores lower because they were ticked-off and distracted by the annoying sound of students chewing gum.
Good point, although I was thinking more along the lines of, the chewer not being allowed to chew thinking, "gee, I need a stick of gum" and the guy next to him thinking "gee, I could use a joint".

And; I'm sure they didn't force any non-chewers to chew the gum.

I can see the ad now. "Recommended by mathemeticians for thier students who chose to chew gum".

tdvance
2009-Apr-23, 09:56 PM
hmm--we have an expression, "chew things over" or "chew on it for a while" to mean "think about it"--makes me wonder if it is ingrained in our collective knowledge that chewing enhances thinking.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-27, 03:13 PM
Kids with ADHD on meds test better than peers (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30425047/)

Children on medicine for attention deficit disorder scored higher on academic tests than their unmedicated peers in the first large, long-term study suggesting this kind of benefit from the widely used drugs.
So the years of practical experience, and millions of individual cases weren't enough?

When it comes to issues that have an immediate impact on physical or mental health, how is a large long term study anything useful? Either the kid is better, or the kid is not. Does it really matter if other kids are better or not? The end result is, any evidence will give you the incentive to try.

They should concentrate the effort on long term effects. How harmful is it in the long run?

Gillianren
2009-Apr-27, 08:30 PM
The problem, I think, is that a lot of the benefits from psych meds are pretty subjective. Sometimes, it's like the Sun coming out from behind the clouds--the effect is immediate, obvious, and amazing. In a lot of cases, however, it's a slow slog up from the dregs to something better but still not very good. And a lot of people have had the meds that used to work stop working, which must be horrible. (In order for me to know for sure, I would have to find meds that work in the first place.) Long-term studies on the benefits are actually helpful.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Apr-28, 12:21 PM
Also, it would seem to indicate that the drugs help with retained learning over the long run rather than having immediate benefits with long term detrimental effects.

It would be entirely possible for a drug of that type to make the child sit still and apparently able to concentrate but still make them learn slower that untreated peers and that's what the study looks like it ruled out.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-28, 02:24 PM
The problem, I think, is that a lot of the benefits from psych meds are pretty subjective...
That's part of my reasoning.
From the few people that I know have taken psych meds, it has been a very personal (one-on-one) process of choosing, monitoring and changing as needed.

Long-term studies on the benefits are actually helpful.
Yes; but can all ADHD drugs, symptoms, or causes be lumped together like that?


Also, it would seem to indicate that the drugs help with retained learning over the long run rather than having immediate benefits with long term detrimental effects.
I'm not quite clear on that. It was a long term study, but it was studying multiple short term results over a wide range of time. I would think retention would have to be tested after removing the subject from the drug, or some long term memory type of test.

It would be entirely possible for a drug of that type to make the child sit still and apparently able to concentrate but still make them learn slower that untreated peers and that's what the study looks like it ruled out.
I can agree with that. I just think that there are so many more and bigger factors involved that this really doesn't say much, and shouldn't stand alone as it's own story.

Gillianren
2009-Apr-28, 05:36 PM
That's part of my reasoning.
From the few people that I know have taken psych meds, it has been a very personal (one-on-one) process of choosing, monitoring and changing as needed.

And for most illnesses, it is. We've gone through the travails of my meds here, at least in passing.


Yes; but can all ADHD drugs, symptoms, or causes be lumped together like that?

It's easier with ADHD. There are fewer drugs. As for causes, well, yes. Most disorders of its type are very clearly caused by biological factors--there seems, in short, to be a strong genetic component. And, of course, the symptoms are part and parcel with the condition in the first place. And either way, my brief research shows that there aren't good long-term studies on the effects of treatment. These are vital; if there aren't statistically significant long-term benefits, there's no point in long-term treatment.

NEOWatcher
2009-Apr-29, 08:16 PM
Animals that play dead sacrifice others (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30477651/)

If they made a point that they are consciously sacrificing others, then maybe they have a point. But; it doesn't read that way.

Heck yeah... Self-preservation is by definition selfish.:eh:

And just because others die, doesn't meand that less would die if you didn't protect yourself. It just means that you protected yourself. Jeez.


During one experiment, around 60 percent of the beetles were eaten by the spider when they were alone and playing dead versus just 9.6 percent when additional mobile insects were nearby.
Riiiight. All that means is the spider was full by the time he got to that one.:rolleyes:



She and her colleagues observed how different aged fire ants acted when they were under attack from neighboring colonies.
"Days-old workers responded to aggression by death feigning, weeks-old workers responded by fleeing, and months-old workers responded by fighting back," Cassill and her team determined.
The older ants might have died holding down the fort, but they were four times more likely to perish than the younger ants that simply went into a catatonic state.

Imagine that. The ones who fight are more prone to perish. :wall:

HenrikOlsen
2009-May-05, 07:19 PM
Makes sense as strategy given that it's the influence on the queen's chance of reproducing that determines whether a strategy for workers is likely to be reinforced by increased allele frequency.

The older workers have already done the work they're going to do in their life, for the young ones to die is a waste of potential work.


A nasty parallel is that for a society it might be more optimal to have the military consist of old people who have already paid their taxes, since the loss to potential tax income when they are killed is much less.

NEOWatcher
2009-May-14, 02:23 PM
Walking disaster? Why some are accident prone (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30710797/)
Basically; it says that there really are accident prone people, and it's mostly because they are not paying attention.
There are other reasons they discuss, but they all seem very intuitive.
Statistically:


After reviewing the results of 79 studies which recorded the mishaps and misfortunes of nearly 150,000 people from 15 countries, researchers at the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands found that accident-prone people do actually exist. In fact, one out of every 29 people has a 50 percent or higher chance of having an accident than the rest of us.

Like I have heard so many people say so many times for so many reasons SLOW DOWN and PAY ATTENTION. Until enough people get that message, I'm not sure there's much you can do with this study.

Anyway: this was good.


“I cannot imagine why this stuff happens so often,” says Joyce, a 48-year-old sales executive from Austin, Texas, who is also prone to kitchen accidents such as setting herself on fire.

I hate when that happens. :lol:

Tobin Dax
2009-May-14, 05:59 PM
Most of my stupid accidents are due to not paying attention to one thing as I'm doing something else. That and not thinking things completely through. If I'm in a busy kitchen, I tend to burn myself fairly often. And then there was the pot that I grabbed without potholders because one of the handle was off of the stove, and so it wasn't hot. This wasn't the case for the handle on the other side of the pot. :doh: I've knocked over a drink on a table about 3 times in the past two years.

So, anyway, I do know why this stuff happens to me. I've predicted it once or twice. Luckily, I've never set myself on fire.

HenrikOlsen
2009-May-14, 06:38 PM
I just removed the skin off the back of one of my knuckles by not being careful enough with an angle-grinder:(

I'm not really strong, so when it snagged while I was cutting a 4 inch pipe it twisted in my hands and went into a fast gyroscopic wobble.
It was actually the guard that took off the skin through the violent wobble, my hands never got anywhere near the rotating disk.

Funny thing is that it was one of those injuries where you go Hmm, that's gonna be irritating as hell for the next week but I don't feel anything now, so I'd better finish the cutting before it starts hurting.

PraedSt
2009-May-14, 06:45 PM
A nasty parallel is that for a society it might be more optimal to have the military consist of old people who have already paid their taxes, since the loss to potential tax income when they are killed is much less.
I can imagine countries would queue up to fight this nation. :lol:

PraedSt
2009-May-14, 07:28 PM
I'm not sure if this belongs here Neowatcher, but here goes:

US Govt wastes paper (http://www.physorg.com/news161531309.html)


The survey of 380 federal government employees, conducted in March by O'Keeffe & Company, reported that 92 percent say they don't need all the documents they print in a day.

The average federal employee will print 7,200 pages annually, the company said, and discard 35 percent of them on the same day they're printed.

Government waste? Shocking.

Fazor
2009-May-14, 07:57 PM
I'm not sure if this belongs here Neowatcher, but here goes:

US Govt wastes paper (http://www.physorg.com/news161531309.html)
Shocking. :eek:

Doesn't surprise me. Our company is the same way. And whatever geniuses they have in the document publication department have a fetish for creating forms that leave a single line of unnecessary text hanging on the last page, and managing to make it impossible not to print all the pages. (Short of switching the printer to manual feed, and feeding one less page than necessary, then canceling the job once the part you need finishes.)

NEOWatcher
2009-Jun-29, 06:11 PM
Nearly 3 percent of elderly falls that land in ERs are tied to canes, walkers, US study shows (http://www.fox8.com/news/nationworld/sns-ap-us-med-elderly-falls,0,4456910.story)

ATLANTA (AP) — Health officials say more than 47,000 elderly Americans end up in emergency rooms each year from falls involving walkers and canes.
That's almost 3 percent of all falls among people 65 and older.
And what percentage of people 65 and older use canes and walkers?

their study shows that doctors should take more time to better fit patients with walking aids and to teach how to use them safely.
Could it also be that the people that are unsteady on thier feet use canes and walkers? :wall:

PraedSt
2009-Jun-29, 06:28 PM
Yeah. It's also worth considering how many falls there would have been without the use of canes and walkers.

tdvance
2009-Jun-29, 11:21 PM
FYI -- there is a nice editorial in the latest Sky and Telescope--near the front, the editor-in-chief's page, whose thesis is essentially that with the Internet, journalism is essentially dead (he focused on science journalism). I think seeing a lot of this kind of article has a way of making one think that.

He gave as an example, NASA put out a press release with a substantial error in it, then put out a corrected version, but several news sources published the original version verbatim, and didn't publish a correction. He thought real journalism means actually checking the facts rather than publishing a press release verbatim--and of course, if after doing that there's still a mistake, printing a correction as soon as feasible.

Gillianren
2009-Jun-30, 12:12 AM
You know, all those who criticize the state of journalism now (which I'll freely acknowledge is problematic) should look at older newspapers. Errors and exaggerations aren't exactly new. Putting news on the front page, on the other hand, is.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jun-30, 04:24 PM
You know, all those who criticize the state of journalism now (which I'll freely acknowledge is problematic) should look at older newspapers. Errors and exaggerations aren't exactly new.
Yes; I agree they are nothing new. (extra, extra, read all about it)
On the other hand, the technology to avoid the errors and get information is so much better that those issues should have been dramatically reduced.
Besides; When I was younger, I also remember an actual section on the inside front page for "corrections". I don't see that any more, just revised stories ignoring what they previously said.

Here's another entry for the thread...
When hammering, women nail it (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31638222/ns/technology_and_science-science/)

"On average, men were about 25 percent more accurate than women in the dark; women were about 10 percent more accurate then men in the light," Irschick said.
First; why study it?
I think we are getting too many "gender" or "race" difference studies. Shouldn't we be getting away from this and start judging people on who they are? Then when that isn't sufficient explain why?

Second; that's just one part of hammering (although a big part of safety)

I'll let everyone else wonder about the metaphors of hammering, or nailing as it relates to the sexes and lighting levels.

Fazor
2009-Jun-30, 04:39 PM
I'll let everyone else wonder about the metaphors of hammering, or nailing as it relates to the sexes and lighting levels.
Darn, you beat me to it. :) Though I should thank you for giving me an out to avoid a joke that would likely result in a . . . time out in the BAUT-corner.

I don't have anything against gender studies (this particular one sounds stupid, but whatever). The thing I hate is how often they seem to avoid the gender-influence versus environmental-influences in these tests. Are men really better at x or women better at y, or are kids who were raised to do x or y better at it then ones who weren't?

HenrikOlsen
2009-Jun-30, 05:31 PM
First; why study it?
I think we are getting too many "gender" or "race" difference studies. Shouldn't we be getting away from this and start judging people on who they are? Then when that isn't sufficient explain why?
Because when we understand why there's a difference, we'll have a deeper understanding about how it's done at all.

Tobin Dax
2009-Jun-30, 06:53 PM
I'll let everyone else wonder about the metaphors of hammering, or nailing as it relates to the sexes and lighting levels.
Darn, you beat me to it. :) Though I should thank you for giving me an out to avoid a joke that would likely result in a . . . time out in the BAUT-corner.
Seriously. It's a bannable post waiting to happen.

Henrik's post above made me relate these types of studies and comparative planetology. (Guess what class I start next week.) I'll leave the set-up for someone else.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jun-30, 07:21 PM
Because when we understand why there's a difference, we'll have a deeper understanding about how it's done at all.
Besides leaving yourself wide-open for some smart remark...

I was trying to convey, in some way, that we know there are differences, but in many cases it really doesn't matter. In other cases, the differences of one group over another might not be any more significance than the variance between people within a group.

And; when we get these studies of one group to another, then please say why you think it's worth studying or what triggered the study.

Otherwise, it just sounds to me like somebody trying to make a point of dominance, or just some mundane College course experiment that happened to have a relative of a reporter in the class.

Fazor
2009-Jun-30, 07:28 PM
I've seen a lot of reports on "studies" that seem to be nothing more than something some college student / department did as part of a requirement for a class or PHD or whatever.

I didn't go to school for anything science-related, so I don't know how that works. Just always assumed you'd have to complete a number of studies / experiments / whatever, and that these studies tend to end up in the news.

tdvance
2009-Jun-30, 09:35 PM
Yes; I agree they are nothing new. (extra, extra, read all about it)
On the other hand, the technology to avoid the errors and get information is so much better that those issues should have been dramatically reduced.
Besides; When I was younger, I also remember an actual section on the inside front page for "corrections". I don't see that any more, just revised stories ignoring what they previously said.

Here's another entry for the thread...
When hammering, women nail it (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31638222/ns/technology_and_science-science/)

First; why study it?
I think we are getting too many "gender" or "race" difference studies. Shouldn't we be getting away from this and start judging people on who they are? Then when that isn't sufficient explain why?

Second; that's just one part of hammering (although a big part of safety)

I'll let everyone else wonder about the metaphors of hammering, or nailing as it relates to the sexes and lighting levels.


Lesson learned--when hammering nails, do it in the dark!

Tobin Dax
2009-Jun-30, 10:26 PM
I've seen a lot of reports on "studies" that seem to be nothing more than something some college student / department did as part of a requirement for a class or PHD or whatever.
Heh, maybe I was right to not get PhD if the research isn't worth anything.

Admittedly, there are some that make me wonder, but PhD does not belong in that sentence, Fazor.

tdvance
2009-Jul-01, 01:59 AM
as part of a requirement for a Ph. D. -- some studies done for dissertations in some areas do get a little silly. I remember finding some lulus in some national dissertation database at a terminal in a UVA library. One was something like "how hats change in the 20th century".

Fazor
2009-Jul-01, 03:19 AM
Heh, maybe I was right to not get PhD if the research isn't worth anything.

Admittedly, there are some that make me wonder, but PhD does not belong in that sentence, Fazor.

I wasn't saying that a PhD is bad or that they're all stupid. Just that when you have that many people that have to come up with original studies, some of them would be bound to get . . . interesting.

And a lot of news articles on "studies" make me wonder if they're just picking up these kinds of studies, or if they're actual commisioned studies. If the later, I oft wonder why anyone would pay for them.

DonM435
2009-Jul-01, 03:49 PM
I wasn't saying that a PhD is bad or that they're all stupid. Just that when you have that many people that have to come up with original studies, some of them would be bound to get . . . interesting.

And a lot of news articles on "studies" make me wonder if they're just picking up these kinds of studies, or if they're actual commisioned studies. If the later, I oft wonder why anyone would pay for them.


I worked in a university's College of Education for many years. You wouldn't believe all the dissertations that proved things like:

Distractions are bad for learning.
Kids who study do better than those who don't.
Smart kids achieve better than dumb kids.

. . . that kind of thing.

NEOWatcher
2009-Jul-08, 02:26 PM
Stuck in traffic less? Study says thank economy (http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/07/08/economy.traffic/index.html)



Rising joblessness and stinging gas prices have put the brakes on worsening trends in traffic congestion, according to a study issued Wednesday by the Texas Transportation Institute

Ok; fine we all knew that. But, even if the study has some important ties to what the statistics are saying, the story itself leads me to wonder what the ties to the economy really are.



The institute attributed the changes to the recession, but the U.S. economy did not begin to slow significantly until the end of 2007.