PDA

View Full Version : Anyone know a great steel or aluminum fabricator?



Mister Earl
2007-Mar-14, 04:50 PM
What I'm looking to have made is a stainless steel or aluminum Rubik's cube. Not the regular 3x3 sided one, mind you, but one at least 5x5 or preferably 10x10. I love the Rubik's cube, but you can only get cheap plastic nowadays, and I want one made of metal so I can keep it around, and eventually hand down.

The plan is, instead of having merely colored stickers on it, I'm going to have the thing engraved. I figure different symbols on different sides, but I'm still thinking that one through.

#Edit#
I'm aware of the olympic cube site, and they ARE very nice, but they aren't manufactuing and selling yet, and they cannot fabricate one out of metals.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-14, 06:03 PM
Nobody? O_o

Doodler
2007-Mar-14, 06:31 PM
That would handle a project like that, no, unfortunately. Even if you do find someone, what you're looking for's gonna be a might expensive...

trinitree88
2007-Mar-14, 06:49 PM
What I'm looking to have made is a stainless steel or aluminum Rubik's cube. Not the regular 3x3 sided one, mind you, but one at least 5x5 or preferably 10x10. I love the Rubik's cube, but you can only get cheap plastic nowadays, and I want one made of metal so I can keep it around, and eventually hand down.

The plan is, instead of having merely colored stickers on it, I'm going to have the thing engraved. I figure different symbols on different sides, but I'm still thinking that one through.

#Edit#
I'm aware of the olympic cube site, and they ARE very nice, but they aren't manufactuing and selling yet, and they cannot fabricate one out of metals.


Mr. Earl. I don't know how great they are, but MIT's machine shop is for hire. Took a tour of the facilities ~ 10 years ago, and they were advertising for extra work. I'd imagine any large university would have a machine shop where they make models. Tech requirements for an engineering degree usually require some competency in metal-working, like building four cannons, one of aluminum, one of steel, one of brass, one of graphite, all machined to the same tolerances....workable or not, just to show facility in handling the material. Happy hunting...they usually contract to make an item, and charge a materials fee, and labor costs per hour. Pete.:dance:

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-14, 07:08 PM
I'll save if I have to. I want a Rubik's cube that's totally original, big (I have huge hands...), and custom. Something that will survive for very long time that I can hand down. Gonna google MIT and see if I can find contact information.

Larry Jacks
2007-Mar-14, 09:04 PM
My brother Steve is a master machinist and welder. He could probably make what you want. He helped build the double-lobed aluminum liquid oxygen tank for the X-33 (the one that worked), among other things. However, he certainly doesn't work cheap.

Whirlpool
2007-Mar-15, 01:32 AM
Maybe a local plumber can help you out...


:neutral:

sarongsong
2007-Mar-15, 04:40 AM
or:
...first true online alternative to a machine shop...parts will be machined and delivered - at low cost...Quantity 1 to 1,000,000...[download] FREE Intelligent design software gives instant exact pricing... eMachineShop (http://www.emachineshop.com)

The Backroad Astronomer
2007-Mar-15, 04:43 AM
for some reason when I see Intelligent design my mind just wants to start making jokes.

One Skunk Todd
2007-Mar-15, 02:04 PM
Hmmm... only 3x3x3. Says solid chrome. For the price I'm guessing it must be all metal. Leather inlaid color blocks:

http://www.zontikgames.com/parlour_games/rubiks_cube

SeanF
2007-Mar-15, 03:13 PM
From sarongsong's eMachineShop (http://www.emachineshop.com/faq/prices.htm) website:


Simple jobs on simple machines generally start at around $150 for setup and as low as $1 per part (or even lower) for simple parts.

If I'm correctly recalling what my 4x4x4 looks like when I take it apart, I'm guessing you're looking at upwards of $700.

How badly do you want this, Mister Earl? :)

EDIT: I believe the 5x5x5 has much more complicated internal mechanism than the 4x4x4 (the 4 is actually simpler than the 3), so going for a 5x5x5 is probably going to be much more expensive - at least twice as much, I would suspect.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-15, 04:16 PM
The mechanism for the 11x11 with the olympic cube folks is far more simpler than the 5x5 for the rubik folks :)
EDIT: That chrome and leather cube is nice, but 3x3 is too easy. I want a very, very difficult cube. The chrome is nice, though.
EDIT AGAIN: Not buying / fabricating yet, just looking to get an idea of the expense. Yes, I would pay several hundred dollars. I want something like a Nerd's family heirloom. Something that will last ages.
EDIT x3: Just fired off an email to the folks at Zontik to see if they do custom comissioned works. Let's see how that goes.

SeanF
2007-Mar-15, 04:31 PM
The mechanism for the 11x11 with the olympic cube folks is far more simpler than the 5x5 for the rubik folks :)
Where can I see the mechanism for the olympic cubes?

Nicolas
2007-Mar-15, 04:34 PM
How come this 11*11 is so relatively simple? Because I thought that for Rubik, 5*5 was almost a practical maximum for the mechanism. Beyond that, it would become very hard to turn the thing.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-15, 04:42 PM
There are different mechanisms, actually. The folks over at http://www.olympicube.com/ figured out a pratical way of making a 11x11 cube. The original Rubik's cube mechanism could only handle 5x5. You can see how robust this new mechanism is with http://youtube.com/watch?v=9_cqDcUH4wA

SeanF
2007-Mar-15, 04:47 PM
How come this 11*11 is so relatively simple? Because I thought that for Rubik, 5*5 was almost a practical maximum for the mechanism. Beyond that, it would become very hard to turn the thing.
If you look at the pictures on the Olympic Cube (http://www.olympicube.com/) website, the 7x7x7 and bigger aren't true cubes - there's a definite curve to them. I would guess Rubik wasn't considering that option.

Part of the problem with bigger than 5x5x5 is that when you rotate one slice, the corner cube on the adjacent slice is completely exposed and could just fall out. Putting the curve in it like Olympic has done would serve to alleviate that.

I presume there's some additional new aspect of the internal mechanism as well, though, since I see they do have a 6x6x6 that's not curved.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-15, 04:58 PM
If you look at the pictures on the Olympic Cube (http://www.olympicube.com/) website, the 7x7x7 and bigger aren't true cubes - there's a definite curve to them.

Definitely an elegant solution to the problem, no? :D

EDIT: I wish they were manufacturing, already. I sent them an email weeks ago about making a stainless steel cube, but I never got a definite response. I'm thinking that due to its intricacy, I might have to contact a jeweler instead.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-15, 05:07 PM
And I doubt the olympic cube folks would show off thier mechanism... proprietary information and all that :)

SeanF
2007-Mar-15, 06:18 PM
And I doubt the olympic cube folks would show off thier mechanism... proprietary information and all that :)
But you made this comment:


The mechanism for the 11x11 with the olympic cube folks is far more simpler than the 5x5 for the rubik folks
You've got some kind of insider knowledge, do you? ;)

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-15, 07:02 PM
Just what they say on the site:

This patented invention has in a general way solved the problem associated with the linking of the corner piece to the interior part of the cube, preventing the breaking of the cube into pieces, while, at the same time enabling the player to rotate the cube layers as fast as he can (speed cubing).

SeanF
2007-Mar-15, 08:41 PM
Just what they say on the site:
Ah. I don't see where that necessarily means their mechanism is simpler than Rubik's, though. :think:

BTW, check out this picture (http://www.olympicube.com/Pic4.jpg) of their perfectly straight 6x6x6 cube. I think I see how they got the edge pieces on that one to not be totally exposed when one slice is turned 45 degrees.

See it? :)

EDIT: Nicolas, there's something else that I bet Rubik didn't consider when he said a 6x6x6 wasn't feasible! :D

JohnD
2007-Mar-15, 11:34 PM
Mr.Earl,
For what you want, an heirloom, you might do better to consult a jeweller than a fabricator. For the cost of the work involved, the cost of the material is, er, immaterial. One of these cubes in silver, with engraved and inlaid numbers/letters, would be a gorgeous object.

John

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-16, 01:01 PM
I agree. Solid silver might be a bit over the top, though. Right now I'm thinking about what to put on the sides. I was thinking of a science theme... like make one side part of the periodic table of elements. Need 6 different types of symbols, though, and I am having trouble deciding.

EDIT: And SeanF, I'm not seeing what you are?

EDIT2: Maybe I oughtta contact Dutch, and have him build me one of those Hyperdimensional Cubes he keeps talking about.

JohnD
2007-Mar-16, 01:13 PM
As this will not be a scientific object but one of beauty, then Earth, Water, Air and Fire, plus ?Life and Death?

John

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-16, 02:15 PM
Nah, the theme of the cube will be "Proud Nerd". You're talking about the common misconception of the ancient's perception of elemental forces. I'm thinking periodic table, maybe a PI face with say ten thousand of its digits etched on that side of the face in tiny numbers... maybe a small copy of the plaque on the Voyager I as another face... DaVinci's sketch of man on the other side... you get the idea.

SeanF
2007-Mar-16, 02:25 PM
EDIT: And SeanF, I'm not seeing what you are?
The pieces aren't all the same size.

Looking at that green side as a flat surface, the four corner squares are slightly larger than the 16 center squares, and the 16 edge pieces aren't squares at all - they're rectangles.

Meaning those edge pieces are actually larger than 1/6th of the full length along the relevant dimensions, so they don't get entirely exposed when an adjacent slice is turned 45 degrees.

Pretty clever, and subtle enough that it's not too obvious.

JohnD
2007-Mar-16, 05:15 PM
How about:
"e^i.Pi +1 = 0", "E=mc^2", "C=Ae^-at", "C=Pi.r^2", "e^Pi=(-1)^-i", plus Schroedingers equation, which I can't write here for lack of Greek letters.

Or choose your own mathematical heroes, Proud Nerd!

John
(I could have been a judge if I'd had the Latin)

HenrikOlsen
2007-Mar-16, 07:18 PM
eiπ+1=0, E=mc2, C=Ae-at, C=πr2, eπ=(-1)-i, H(t)|ψ(t)〉=iħδ/δt|ψ(t)〉

Look in this thead (http://bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36528) for greek letters.

Mister Earl
2007-Mar-18, 12:23 PM
It's going to be great, once I have the plans down, and someone to make it hehe. I'll post pics once it's made.

SeanF
2008-Oct-08, 07:27 PM
Hey, Mister Earl, just bumping this thread to see how you've come on this project, and also because I just found out that the Olympic Cube people (https://v-cubes.com/ecom) are now selling their 5x5x5, 6x6x6, and 7x7x7.

Gotta get that letter to Santa.... :)

suntrack2
2008-Oct-10, 06:48 AM
the idea of alluminium and steel rubik cube is great one, most of the plastic parts not go easily as the alluminium and steel parts may move more faster in the cube. I have searched many sites but not appropriate information found on this, though there are many sites found of plastic rubik cube only.

I like to play the rubik cube, I just arrange it in just 30seconds. (one colour of 9 squares), I have not seen anyone who can arrange all the colours at the same time. :)