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BigJim
2003-May-31, 02:17 AM
Al Bean was the LMP on Apollo 12 and the Commander of Skylab 3. He retired to devote his time to painting - but up until now I didn't realize what a good painter he was. He is, after all, the only artist with firsthand experience of another world.

See Al's paintings here. (http://www.alanbeangallery.com/cat-miss.html)

http://www.alanbeangallery.com/priceless.jpg

Glom
2003-May-31, 02:52 AM
If you read the Apollo 12 Lunar Surface Journal, you'll see that Al Bean is probably the most insightful in the commentary of all the astronauts because he is much more familiar with all the missions, having researched them for his paintings. At Space Center Houston, there is a good one with the arms.

Tuckerfan
2003-May-31, 05:19 AM
Bean's said he's angry with himself for not taking a sketch pad with him to the Moon and making some drawings while he was there. A really interesting thing is that the folks at NASA gave Bean the gloves and patches from his suit, and he's ground them up to mix with his paints. So not only are his paintings of the Moon, they have the Moon in them! Wish I could afford one.

Peter B
2003-Jun-01, 02:40 PM
...Al Bean is probably the most inciteful in the commentary of all the astronauts...

Tee hee! I think you mean insightful in this case. :)

I think it'd be an interesting question to determine who'd be the most inciteful.

BTW, I'm starting to get a serious urge to own an Alan Bean painting.

Glom
2003-Jun-01, 03:36 PM
...Al Bean is probably the most inciteful in the commentary of all the astronauts...

Tee hee! I think you mean insightful in this case. :)

I think it'd be an interesting question to determine who'd be the most inciteful.

BTW, I'm starting to get a serious urge to own an Alan Bean painting.

:oops: :oops:

Argos
2003-Jun-01, 08:14 PM
His work is very interesting. A good example of figurative painting (currently back to the mainstream painting). His style surprisingly evokes the soviet realism.

And Glom, as to owing a Beans painting, see this one, textured with moon dust, priced US$ 32, 000.

http://www.novaspace.com/AUTO/ABorig/Duke.html

Argos
2003-Jun-01, 08:15 PM
His work is very interesting. A good example of figurative painting (currently back to the mainstream painting). His style surprisingly evokes the soviet realism.

And Glom, as to owing a Beans painting, see this one, textured with moon dust, priced US$ 32, 000.

http://www.novaspace.com/AUTO/ABorig/Duke.html

Glom
2003-Jun-01, 09:25 PM
Argos, I think that point was supposed to be addressed to Tuckerfan... twice.

Argos
2003-Jun-01, 10:47 PM
Sorry. Itīs to PeterB, indeed.

Iain Lambert
2003-Jun-02, 09:43 AM
For those that don't know, there is a selection of pictures of his paintings, along with some commentary on how he makes them, on the absolutely wonderful Criterion DVD of For All Mankind. As if the film itself, the glorious score in 5.1 and the commentary track wasn't enough reason to own it.

Tuckerfan
2003-Jun-02, 12:24 PM
For those that don't know, there is a selection of pictures of his paintings, along with some commentary on how he makes them, on the absolutely wonderful Criterion DVD of For All Mankind. As if the film itself, the glorious score in 5.1 and the commentary track wasn't enough reason to own it.Oh yes! I wanted a copy of the film when I heard the Brian Eno soundtrack back in 88 or 89! Had to wait until 1999 until I could get a copy of it. The film ranks right up there with Koyaanisqatsi IMHO. Watching that film, there's no way I could ever believe the HB's had any chance of being right. The images are just too clear, too real to be faked.

Dickenmeyer
2003-Jun-04, 11:00 PM
There is a framed, numbered and signed print of Bean's painting The Hammer and the Feather at the ART-n-STUFF shop in my local mall.
It's pretty cool but I can't afford to part with the $320.00 they want for it right now. Maybe later, when the wife isn't looking.