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crosscountry
2007-Mar-21, 09:16 AM
Happy Spring everyone. Enjoy as the weather warms up, the days get longer, and the sound of motorcycles increases every day.

http://www.lancashire.gov.uk/environment/photographs/landscapes/Gallery1/images/spring%20wood.jpg

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-21, 01:26 PM
Nice picture; and ah yes, . . . SPRING! As much as skiing and sledding and snowball fights were a gas; it is time to move on with the seasons.

Been a mild winter and relatively manageable thaw here in the sticks. The 2 big late snowfalls did make the annual fall runoff a good one. The driveway was a goo pit for only 3 days, and the stream rose about 3' and took out a section of my bridge.

Time to consider a 3rd generation bridge. Unfortunately, even though the stream averages only about 30' wide MOST of the year, I have to build it to withstand that few days each spring when all H2O breaks lose. I'm feverishly scrounging for up to 6 telephone poles (30'). I need to get it high enough that the deck is above high water level in spring, and that means lots more length. I found a convenient crossing where the high ground on each side is just a 60' spread, with a little island that will serve as a perfect place to build a middle pier. I figure with some deep enough pilings (fence posts pounded 6' into the streambed), a well reinforced poured concrete pier should hold; especially since this little island has been growing a bit each year.

I love doing this stuff.

Gillianren
2007-Mar-21, 08:45 PM
The apple and cherry trees are in bloom all over town. The weather's not much different, but it's Washington; the weather's never much different.

Cookie
2007-Mar-21, 09:08 PM
What kind of flowers are thoes?
Somehow, I feel as though I should know their name...

Doodler
2007-Mar-21, 09:17 PM
I'll be preparing my flamethrower for the inevitable battle against airbore pollen producers...

*grumbles and sneezes*

VPCCD
2007-Mar-21, 09:31 PM
I don't mind the flowers, so much as I mind the severe weather.
Seeing as I live in the heart of tornado alley, we get it quite often.

ciderman
2007-Mar-21, 09:35 PM
Bluebells! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Bluebell

Loads around here, got some coming up all over the garden now.
I know of a few places where you can go for a walk in a wood drenched in the sweet smell of them.
Pretty resticted distrubution though, IIRC we have about 80% of the world population in the British Isles.


and the sound of motorcycles increases every day.
Ah yes, charged my battery up the other day.
Best to check your helmet for unwelcome lurkers as mentioned in this thread http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=55910 :eek:
An old concern of mine is that one may someday decide to hide within my crash helmet, only to emerge, perhaps at some speed, but certainly in a high degree of agitation, when levels of airflow though the vents become sufficently high.:D

Edit:Farmer - that sounds great fun, have you considered a drawbridge?:)
Sounds like some railway (railroad?) track could be a useful construction material. I would imagine laws & regulations here would make such an undertaking a nightmare of bureacracy at best, if not impossible. We don't have as much space to play with though.;)

Torsten
2007-Mar-21, 09:47 PM
Woke up to another 5 cm of snow this morning. It's snowing lightly as I write this. The depth in the back yard is still almost 50 cm, and the banks along the driveway over a metre high. It's been mild recently, and lots has melted, but we won't see the end of it here until about the middle of April, just shy of 6 months after it arrived. I'm tired of it, though my son has talked me into going skiing weekend after next.

Moose
2007-Mar-21, 09:54 PM
Mmm. Not only is it spring, but I've just settled down after my fourth BBQed meal of this grilling season. A little spicy chicken; a little salmon grilled/steamed in lemon; thin-sliced potato+onion sprinkled with summer savory; grilled/steamed asparagus; and two scoops of strawberry frozen yoghurt for dessert. Yum.

Gillianren
2007-Mar-21, 10:39 PM
In honour of the day, I've placed a sprig of cherry on my altar and am washing tons and tons of laundry, including things that don't get washed very often (the spare blankets, for example, and probably the sheet that covers the window in the bedroom because the blinds let in too much light).

Hydro
2007-Mar-22, 12:54 AM
What kind of flowers are thoes?
Somehow, I feel as though I should know their name...

Looks almost like our state flower, the Bluebonnet (http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/Texas/Flower_Bluebonnet.html).

danscope
2007-Mar-22, 02:17 AM
Woke up to another 5 cm of snow this morning. It's snowing lightly as I write this. The depth in the back yard is still almost 50 cm, and the banks along the driveway over a metre high. It's been mild recently, and lots has melted, but we won't see the end of it here until about the middle of April, just shy of 6 months after it arrived. I'm tired of it, though my son has talked me into going skiing weekend after next.

Ah....Spring! I appologize for the two snow storms. You see,...I was polishing
my golf clubs last week, in view of the comming season, and surely,it must be a curse. I got whacked with two decidedly nasty snow falls and I'm hard pressed to get 29 ° now. But....the local meteorologists have promised a warming trend this week.
Snow ?? We don't need no Snow!!! We don't need no Steeenkeen Snow!!:)

The Backroad Astronomer
2007-Mar-22, 02:42 AM
One thing I am looking forward to is fiddleheads (they are ferns that a picked before the unfrill, then you boil in water or steam and eat with butter). What I am not looking forward to a the birds perched just outside my window at 6:30 am singing away (I work 6:30pm to 3 am).

Frantic Freddie
2007-Mar-22, 02:54 AM
Here in the high desert we're lookin' forward to the annual Death of the Fruit Blossoms.We water & fertilize the fruit trees & they burst out in blossoms,the bees are busy pollinating,the hummingbirds are flitting around & it's warm & sunny.
Then about the 3rd week of May it drops down to 25F one night & kills 1/2 the blossoms.Then a week or 2 later it hails,clearing off the rest of the flowers.
Ah,spring.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 01:15 PM
Farmer - that sounds great fun, have you considered a drawbridge?:)
Sounds like some railway (railroad?) track could be a useful construction material. I would imagine laws & regulations here would make such an undertaking a nightmare of bureacracy at best, if not impossible. We don't have as much space to play with though.;)

That would be something wouldn't it? The drawbridge that is. I've thought about a paddle wheel. It'd be quite complicated though, due to the challenges of ice and the spring rush of water. It would require a special channel, or removal at certain times of the year. Maybe a simple one just for cosmetics.

I actually did think about steel, but I'd have to find some substantial stuff that was real cheap or free. Rails (train tracks) can be had, but getting them to the site and working with them would be darn near impossible. I've had the honor of moving sections of rail, and the stuff is incredibly heavy. IIRC, even a 3' piece is beyond most people's lifting capacity. (I worked for a company named Thrall that manufactured and repaired rolling stock. Spent a lot of time around trains. We used chunks of rail for everything from benches to doorstops. VERY heavy stuff).

It's a longshot, but if anyone lives within an hour of my coordinates, and happens to know of telephone poles coming down and being disposed of at no charge, let me know. My neighbor has a big tandem trailer and has volunteered to haul for me. They need to be in decent shape, but it'll just be a footbridge, so leached out but not yet rotting is fine.

There are some pretty restrictive rules about doing this stuff, because the stream is a designated trout habitat. Within a certain number of feet of the high water mark, we are not supposed to do anything - not even mow. But almost everybody who lives on it has a bridge of some type. I think as long as we are not obstructing the flow the DNR just looks the other way.

I'm serious about the poles though. I'm asking everywhere I go, everybody I know. I priced debarked pine logs and they are outrageous. Menards wants $12/linear foot. I don't get that because cut up into 2X4's the same amount of wood would be half the price, at the most. Go figure.

Fazor
2007-Mar-22, 02:40 PM
Time to consider a 3rd generation bridge. Unfortunately, even though the stream averages only about 30' wide MOST of the year, I have to build it to withstand that few days each spring when all H2O breaks lose. I'm feverishly scrounging for up to 6 telephone poles (30'). I need to get it high enough that the deck is above high water level in spring, and that means lots more length. I found a convenient crossing where the high ground on each side is just a 60' spread, with a little island that will serve as a perfect place to build a middle pier. I figure with some deep enough pilings (fence posts pounded 6' into the streambed), a well reinforced poured concrete pier should hold; especially since this little island has been growing a bit each year.
I love doing this stuff.

30' wide eh? How deep does it run? Good fishing or no? I'd love to have something like that on my property (well, assuming I had more than the 1/2 acre lot I have now ;)). Fortuneatly my parents have a pond on thier land so it provides me with a seculded fishing spot any time I want one.

Argos
2007-Mar-22, 02:51 PM
It looks like this winter has been quite mild in North Amercia, am I right?

Fazor
2007-Mar-22, 02:55 PM
I can't speak for everyone but here in ohio it was fairly mild. We had *some* really nasty weather for a few weeks, probably a solid month's worth, but can't complain as the "wintery" weather didn't start until almost febuaray. Jan was cold but not bad. December was more like october weather. and today it's 75 and sunny and hopefully we're done with any kind of snow/sleet for the year. Time to break out the old tacklebox and oil up my reels. I'm excited! :)

Moose
2007-Mar-22, 03:43 PM
It looks like this winter has been quite mild in North Amercia, am I right?

I don't know about the rest of North America, but the lack of snow to keep the local rivers up past the end of July is going to make life somewhat more difficult for our salmon and trout this year.

Torsten
2007-Mar-22, 04:36 PM
I'm serious about the poles though. I'm asking everywhere I go, everybody I know. I priced debarked pine logs and they are outrageous. Menards wants $12/linear foot. I don't get that because cut up into 2X4's the same amount of wood would be half the price, at the most. Go figure.

That's because a 2x4 can be cut from a smaller tree than required to make a utility pole, and there are many more small diameter logs available in the market than large diameter logs. A large diameter log has a lot more potential uses: think of 2x6 and 2x10 and the cost per board foot for these products compared to 2x4s. If the large log is of veneer quality, there's yet another possible high value product.

The bridge sounds like fun. I have done a lot of road layout for the forest industry here, and I always find the selection of a bridge site and working out the road alignment to it the most interesting.

I don't know about the rest of North America, but the lack of snow to keep the local rivers up past the end of July is going to make life somewhat more difficult for our salmon and trout this year.

We have more than average snowpack this year. There'll be a big runoff.


It looks like this winter has been quite mild in North Amercia, am I right?

In my neck of the woods this last winter was mild - again. It went below -30C a few times, but never cracked -40 at all. There were many days of just below 0C weather, as I recall. I guess mild is a relative term.

Argos
2007-Mar-22, 04:59 PM
[b]In my neck of the woods this last winter was mild - again. It went below -30C a few times, but never cracked -40 at all.

Well, I see 'mild' can be a very relative concept... :)

Moose
2007-Mar-22, 05:13 PM
Well, I see 'mild' can be a very relative concept... :)

It's a dry cold. :D

Argos
2007-Mar-22, 05:15 PM
Well, I´ve never been exposed to that temperature. Must be weird... :)

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 05:34 PM
30' wide eh? How deep does it run? Good fishing or no? I'd love to have something like that on my property (well, assuming I had more than the 1/2 acre lot I have now ;)). Fortuneatly my parents have a pond on thier land so it provides me with a seculded fishing spot any time I want one.

On average about 30' wide and 18" deep, with the deepest parts maybe 30". Runs hard all year. In winter, even during the -30F dips, only the slow straight parts freeze enough to cross. There is always open water on the curves. Depth only changes significantly during the spring melt, in fact, it has already dropped to normal again. I think the reason it is so steady in performance is because it is only 10 miles long (removes the mystery of why it is named Ten Mile Creek), is spring fed, and drains a relatively small area.

We catch brown trout, but pretty small. It's more catch & release fun for the kids. I'd say the biggest we've caught is 7 or 8". Don't know for sure, but I'd guess it gets too warm for them in the summer. It is so shallow and some stretches get lots of sun, so even by mid-June it is pretty warm - refreshing, but a long ways from cold.

We were very lucky to have found the property just before the development boom hit out here. You can find it on MapQuest or Google. Search for New Richmond WI and then look for the intersection of County Road A and 130th Avenue (about 6 miles SSW of NR). We are the farm on the NE corner of that intersection.

danscope
2007-Mar-22, 05:39 PM
That would be something wouldn't it? The drawbridge that is. I've thought about a paddle wheel. It'd be quite complicated though, due to the challenges of ice and the spring rush of water. It would require a special channel, or removal at certain times of the year. Maybe a simple one just for cosmetics.

I actually did think about steel, but I'd have to find some substantial stuff that was real cheap or free. Rails (train tracks) can be had, but getting them to the site and working with them would be darn near impossible. I've had the honor of moving sections of rail, and the stuff is incredibly heavy. IIRC, even a 3' piece is beyond most people's lifting capacity. (I worked for a company named Thrall that manufactured and repaired rolling stock. Spent a lot of time around trains. We used chunks of rail for everything from benches to doorstops. VERY heavy stuff).

It's a longshot, but if anyone lives within an hour of my coordinates, and happens to know of telephone poles coming down and being disposed of at no charge, let me know. My neighbor has a big tandem trailer and has volunteered to haul for me. They need to be in decent shape, but it'll just be a footbridge, so leached out but not yet rotting is fine.

There are some pretty restrictive rules about doing this stuff, because the stream is a designated trout habitat. Within a certain number of feet of the high water mark, we are not supposed to do anything - not even mow. But almost everybody who lives on it has a bridge of some type. I think as long as we are not obstructing the flow the DNR just looks the other way.

I'm serious about the poles though. I'm asking everywhere I go, everybody I know. I priced debarked pine logs and they are outrageous. Menards wants $12/linear foot. I don't get that because cut up into 2X4's the same amount of wood would be half the price, at the most. Go figure.

Hi, Ice and rot are your foes. I'd get a point on that concrete upstream
to defeat the ice as it moves down stream. Plan ahead.
Be nice if you could make a covered bridge. They last. More weight though.
Nothing's easy.
Best regards, Dan

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 05:49 PM
Hi, Ice and rot are your foes. I'd get a point on that concrete upstream
to defeat the ice as it moves down stream. Plan ahead.
Be nice if you could make a covered bridge. They last. More weight though.
Nothing's easy.
Best regards, Dan

Yep, I thought the pier should be wedge shaped, pointing upstream. I did pound a bunch of posts into the streambed about 50' upstream from the bridge this year to try to keep bigger logs and sheets of ice from hammering the sides of it. Worked for the most part, but one of my posts did come out, and a few good sized chunks hit the bridge. The result is one damaged support and a partially collapsed section.

I want to go with the poles and a higher deck because it is a pain to have to do major repairs every spring; and half the property and all the best hiking is on the other side.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 06:05 PM
Here you go, a nice aerial of our joint (if the clicky thingy works):

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?searchtype=address&country=US&addtohistory=&searchtab=home&formtype=address&popflag=0&latitude=&longitude=&name=&phone=&level=&cat=&address=940+130th+Avenue&city=New+Richmond&state=WI&zipcode=54017

That's a long clicky, heh?

This is the closest you can zoom in MQ before the image becomes useless. You can just make out where the stream meanders thru the woods. Our place is the first (and only driveway) going west from the red star. Property lines are County A, north to within 100' of the neighbors place (the neighbor on the same side of the road), east thru the woods to the field line, then follow the treeline to 130th, and back to A. You can easily see the 5 acre field within the property, the only tillable land we have.

So it basically has the proportions of a typical city block, with a boot on the end. 26.9 acres total.

Fazor
2007-Mar-22, 06:19 PM
Beautiful property (and you weren't lie'n about the photo becoming useless at any higher zoom levels :P)

Torsten
2007-Mar-22, 06:32 PM
Wow, I'd like something like that. That's amazing that it flows as consistently as it does for the small size of the catchment. Am I right that it starts somewhere east of your place between 110th Ave and E Rd and west of 65? You probably get waterfowl nesting around those meanders too. Do you have a trail along the stream?

Gillianren
2007-Mar-22, 08:13 PM
It looks like this winter has been quite mild in North Amercia, am I right?

We got snow more often than we normally do, but the biggest storm problem we had was mostly wind. (Knocked out power for a lot of people around here for days at a time.)

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 08:41 PM
I think the fact that it is not very long (we are at mile 8 or 9 of it's 10 mile course, you can see where it dumps into the Willow River just south us), and that it is spring fed keeps it rolling all year. You can easily see on the aerial photo the biggest source (there are 3). It is the spring fed slough 3 miles directly east of us at 130th & Hwy 65. The other 2 sources disappear into the maize of field drainage channels. We are surrounded by other rivers, Kinnickinnic to the east, Apple to the north, and Willow to the west and south. I think Ten Mile Creek only drains about 15 square miles of land.

That's actually a much better quality photo than they had in the past. Following the streams course backward from our place, see how much of it is open to direct sunlight - which I think accounts for how warm it gets even by mid spring. That slough never freezes over either. We've had stretches of multiple nights at or near -30F, and it stays open and steams like mad. That's why I think it is the main cause of the stream never freezing.

Waterfowl are abundant, but because of our cat and dogs, no waterfowl nests near the house. Every year a few think about it, but then move along once they meet the residents. I also think the swift flow doesn't agree with most of them. We even had a badger dig a huge den right next to our driveway one year. We get plenty of very regular visitors though; herons, woodduck, eagles, lots of hawks, exportable quantities of geese, pheasants, etc.

There is a nice trail down the eastern bank, probably about a 3/4 mile hike. It's amazing how many little nooks and crannies there are to explore even just in such a modest little chunk of wilderness. It is a great little joint, like I said; very lucky to be looking there when we were.

At the current going rate ($30K per acre for last year's cornfield) we could never afford it now. We just happened, by accident, to fall in love with a place just beyond the edge of what was then considered prime investment property. Today, with woods and stream, cut it up into 2 acre lots and it's easily worth a million. I'm ashamed to tell people what we actually paid.

But I do have this advice for anybody who asks: Whether for investment or your own use, go to the edge of development, maybe just a bit further, and buy as much as you can afford. Smartest accident I ever had.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-22, 08:47 PM
Back on track, . . . yes another mild winter; though it was the closest we've had to a real winter in 10 years.

A couple cold snaps, with the one 2 to 3 week blast the only thing I would call COLD. And snow, we did not get squat until the 2 big dumps at the very tail end of winter.

How fast we get spoiled though. I even found myself, in the middle of that one cold spell, whining about it.

I do like some things about that bitter cold. There is a stillness and peacefulness unlike any other when it is -30F and no wind. It's kinda eerie, like the world is frozen, WHICH IT IS!

crosscountry
2007-Mar-22, 11:09 PM
So much for Spring, it's snowed for nearly 24 hours straight. We were supposed to drive to the Alps tomorrow, weather said 40 and rainy.

Oh well, Mom gets to see snow for the first time, poor Texas girl.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-23, 02:39 AM
Picture posting attempt.

Vermonter
2007-Mar-23, 04:06 AM
Picture posting attempt.

Successful. With the 50+ temps we had today, a bunch of snow has melted/evaporated. The Ides of March are finally here. I'd guess that nearly a foot and a half went away in the span of two days. o.O

Frantic Freddie
2007-Mar-23, 05:24 AM
Here in the Land of Enchanment we did not have a mild winter.

By late December we'd already broken records for snowfall.

Just at my house,I've never seen anything less than 0F here,this year I saw -10F.
We ain't had this much snow or seen these temps in 10 years.Preceded by a monsoon season that lasted for 2 months,with record rain fall.

we accidentally drove into a flooded area on our way home,it was dark.It's kinda scary when your car moves a coupla feet sideways.

Torsten
2007-Mar-23, 07:10 AM
But I do have this advice for anybody who asks: Whether for investment or your own use, go to the edge of development, maybe just a bit further, and buy as much as you can afford. Smartest accident I ever had.

Good advice!

Argos: Well, Iīve never been exposed to that temperature. Must be weird...

I like it in the autumn when it's about -15C in the morning and warms to about 0C in the afternoon. I get lots of field work done on days like that. Colder than that is just no fun, but we love to talk about it! The coldest I've experienced is -46C, and the coldest I've done fieldwork in was -28C, but that was an emergency.

All the vehicles up here have block heaters, and you see them with electrical cords hanging out the front in the winter. I usually plug mine in when it gets below -15C. But this is the weird part: When it's really cold, the tire sidewalls don't flex very well. So when you start driving, the vehicle goes thump, thump, thump until they finally loosen up. The transmission doesn't want to shift either for at least the first km or so. It's just really hard on equipment.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-23, 11:44 AM
I love that race car feel you get until the oil in the shocks warms up.

Argos
2007-Mar-23, 01:04 PM
Argos: Well, Iīve never been exposed to that temperature. Must be weird...

I like it in the autumn when it's about -15C in the morning and warms to about 0C in the afternoon. I get lots of field work done on days like that. Colder than that is just no fun, but we love to talk about it! The coldest I've experienced is -46C, and the coldest I've done fieldwork in was -28C, but that was an emergency.

All the vehicles up here have block heaters, and you see them with electrical cords hanging out the front in the winter. I usually plug mine in when it gets below -15C. But this is the weird part: When it's really cold, the tire sidewalls don't flex very well. So when you start driving, the vehicle goes thump, thump, thump until they finally loosen up. The transmission doesn't want to shift either for at least the first km or so. It's just really hard on equipment.

Well itīs abolutely amazing for a guy like me. I like this webcam (http://arcticcam.com/cam/), pointing towards downtown Fairbanks, AK. I get really startled when I see people coming and going and working in january under -40, as if it were a normal day. Down here, when temps plunge to - 8C in southern cities itīs big news in the prime time.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-23, 02:49 PM
Well itīs abolutely amazing for a guy like me. I like this webcam (http://arcticcam.com/cam/), pointing towards downtown Fairbanks, AK. I get really startled when I see people coming and going and working in january under -40, as if it were a normal day. Down here, when temps plunge to - 8C in southern cities itīs big news in the prime time.

People are getting soft all over though. In all my years of school, it was never cancelled because of temperature. Never ever never. If the snow accumulation was bad enough to make roads truly impassable, then that could do it, but never just because it was cold.

Nowadays, any snowfall over 2" carries the possibility of school opening late, closing early, or getting cancelled. And I believe many of them actually have policies in place to close when the temperature or wind chill hits certain levels.

Doodler
2007-Mar-23, 03:01 PM
Well itīs abolutely amazing for a guy like me. I like this webcam (http://arcticcam.com/cam/), pointing towards downtown Fairbanks, AK. I get really startled when I see people coming and going and working in january under -40, as if it were a normal day. Down here, when temps plunge to - 8C in southern cities itīs big news in the prime time.

Yeah, but take someone out of Fairbanks and stick them on a street in Brasilia during a heatwave. ;)

Acclimation is an amazing feat.

Argos
2007-Mar-23, 05:12 PM
Well, interesting enough, Iīve heard that people in Fairbanks can experience 90F days in summer. Yeah, Brasilia can be quite hot in summer, but it is also dry. Try Manaus or Belem, where (humid) 90F is a daily reality...

crosscountry
2007-Mar-25, 07:01 PM
try Houston in the summer it can be above 100F for the entire months of July and August plus 100% humidity. I great up like that playing outside with the other kids.


Actually we normally didn't have more than 6 weeks straight of above 100 degree days.

crosscountry
2007-Mar-25, 07:01 PM
oh, and I'll take that over 115 and no humidity like Phoenix or Las Vegas. I need the humidity to survive.

Maksutov
2007-Mar-26, 09:33 AM
Spring?

Yeccch!

Summer?

Double yeccch!

Come on, Autumn!

Cool for the cool.


PS: If I were rich, I'd spend September through March in the northern hemisphere and March through September in the southern hemisphere.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-13, 01:31 PM
Farmer - that sounds great fun, have you considered a drawbridge?:)

Drawbridge may be closer to an accurate description than I would have thought. The telephone pole search has proven fruitless; and I need to do something this year as the current structure will not stand up to another spring rush.

Got an idea from a company that sells small bridges for places like golf courses and nature trails. Their method for setting boardwalks over swamps and marshy areas uses a footing similar to what's often used to hold the posts for a low level deck. A little concrete mini-footing that a 4X4 post sets in.

If I use a pair of posts on footings every 8' with well-braced crossmembers connecting the pair to each other; then run 8' rails the length of the crossing, with decking on top of that - it should work. Lots of triangulation ought to make it sturdy enough.

Just thinking out loud though, seems like there will be other challenges. How do I keep it from just rising up and floating away in the spring rush? It also will not stand up well to big chunks of moving ice. I suppose I could put the 8' sections together with huge bolts and disassemble it each fall. Way too much work though, especially once I get a bit older.

I wonder if I could take some cues from the hardware and materials used for docks (the kind people put in and out every year)?

Back to the drawing board.

Fazor
2007-Jun-13, 02:51 PM
The only bridge I've ever had to build was out of popcicle sticks for science class in like 6th grade. So unless you and the fam. can go through a couple thousand boxes of popcicles this summer, you're beyond my expertise.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-14, 01:10 AM
we used creosote posts and sunk them real deep. Every year we had to block them up because they sank more. That's part of the deal.

Doodler
2007-Jun-14, 02:38 AM
Doodler's Spring Report:


AAAAA-CHOOOOOOOO!!!

*sniff*