PDA

View Full Version : Hinode's Amazing New Images of the Sun's Surface



Fraser
2007-Mar-22, 07:11 PM
NASA released some absolutely amazing new images of the surface of the Sun today, taken by the Japanese Hinode spacecraft. Just look at the attached image with this story, and you'll get a sense of why astronomers think this spacecraft will do for solar astronomy what Hubble has done for the visual spectrum. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/03/22/hinodes-amazing-new-images-of-the-suns-surface/)

SoLotus
2007-Mar-22, 11:21 PM
There actually are some colour videos on that site.. just replace the word "five" in the URL with "four" and you get one.
Also http://solarb.msfc.nasa.gov/movies/SOT_ca_061120_0715.mpg

Note that the link is 15MB for an admittedly amazing 10 seconds video

TuTone
2007-Mar-22, 11:33 PM
What an amazing image of the Sun.

magman
2007-Mar-23, 12:32 AM
WOw! the videos are truly amazing. the flows of electricty are awesome, they move like they have a life of thier own. I spent hours watching these videos, after seeing the sound bites on two different comercial television stations!

The Electric (sorry Magnetic) Sun!

I got a funny feely in my tummy, this will blow the current understanding of the Suns dynamics clean out of the water!

If only we could see the Suns core, instead of just the plasma, magnetic and electrical effects we can see on the surface.

Bring on the data!!!

TuTone
2007-Mar-23, 02:46 PM
They should post both the black & white video & the color video.
They are two different events on the sun.
I like the black & white video better -- You can see it better & seems like more activity.

SoLotus
2007-Mar-23, 06:13 PM
Ooh sorry I should have put a size warning on that link.

Yeah the black and white one is more interesting. All quite awesome though!

Fermbiz
2007-Mar-23, 06:25 PM
I haven't seen the vid yet because im at work. If its as good as everyone is saying, Im gonna try to make a video wallpaper with vista :)

John Mendenhall
2007-Mar-23, 08:09 PM
If only we could see the Suns core, instead of just the plasma, magnetic and electrical effects we can see on the surface.



Put a neutrino generator on the other side of the Sun from Earth. Fire the neutrinos through the Sun. Put a detector on Earth. Use computerized tomography to generate a map of the Sun's interior.

Should only require the entire output of the global economy for two or three years to do this.

blueshift
2007-Mar-24, 03:42 PM
I'm in the fog as to how to play that movie. All I get is a blank screen and realplayer probably has nothing to do with playing it...So how and where do I go to set it up?

01101001
2007-Mar-24, 05:14 PM
I'm in the fog as to how to play that movie. All I get is a blank screen and realplayer probably has nothing to do with playing it...So how and where do I go to set it up?

Got other players to try? I know it works with Windows Media Player. Most players have an option to open a URL. Launch the player and tell it, ask it nicely, to play this:

http://solarb.msfc.nasa.gov/movies/SOT_ca_061120_0715.mpg
(SoLotus said 15 megabytes.)

blueshift
2007-Mar-24, 06:42 PM
Got other players to try? I know it works with Windows Media Player. Most players have an option to open a URL. Launch the player and tell it, ask it nicely, to play this:

http://solarb.msfc.nasa.gov/movies/SOT_ca_061120_0715.mpg
(SoLotus said 15 megabytes.)I got it to work with Windows Media Player which I never really set up apparently. Thanks a lot. The movie was really neat. What incredible detail!

trinitree88
2007-Mar-25, 03:47 PM
Put a neutrino generator on the other side of the Sun from Earth. Fire the neutrinos through the Sun. Put a detector on Earth. Use computerized tomography to generate a map of the Sun's interior.

Should only require the entire output of the global economy for two or three years to do this.


John. Actually that wouldn't be necessary. There are enough neutrinos passing through the sun every second to give an image of the core's operations. As yet, we cannot separate the sun generated neutrinos, from fusion processes, from the "sea" background neutrinos. A 22 year sunspot cycle/correlation with the SNO (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory) results, should give a better idea on this. Improvements in low energy neutrino detectors will also help.
Though the sun generates some neutrinos, it's impact on the sea background is larger.
Pete.

Nick4
2007-Jun-07, 04:41 AM
How did the satillite get that close to the sun without being destroyed.