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Maksutov
2007-Mar-27, 02:24 AM
I bet they all had the fish. (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/03/26/sick.airliner/index.html?eref=rss_topstories)
There was "nothing to be concerned about," Dennis Quinton of the New Jersey Department of Homeland Security told CNN. Quinton then immediately left for an unspecified destination which was, to quote, "As far away from here as I can get!" Hope everyone recovers OK. That's it for now, oveur and out.

Swift
2007-Mar-27, 02:35 AM
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday released passengers on board a flight from Hong Kong after determining that the flu-like symptoms in some of them were normal.

So having the flu is normal? I think I know what they mean, but a badly written sentence.

foreignkid
2007-Mar-27, 02:45 AM
Could this be BBC's "End Day" coming true?? :eek:

Gillianren
2007-Mar-27, 02:47 AM
Hope everyone recovers OK. That's it for now, oveur and out.

Roger, Roger. (I just bought that movie a couple of weeks ago, too.)

weatherc
2007-Mar-27, 03:48 AM
I bet they all had the fish. (http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/03/26/sick.airliner/index.html?eref=rss_topstories)Hope everyone recovers OK. That's it for now, oveur and out."Unger."
"Oveur."
"Oveur."
"Dunn."

If we quote much more from that movie we might run into some copyright violations, Mak. :D

mike alexander
2007-Mar-27, 04:23 AM
As long as no one was paging Dr. Ain at the terminal.

Maksutov
2007-Mar-27, 04:59 AM
As long as no one was paging Dr. Ain at the terminal.The fellow in the taxi was one patient person at the terminal. Or was he a terminal patient?

All I know is I used to have a frame grab of Robert Stack punching out one of the Hare Krishnas as a screen saver. It was subtitled "The Aftereffects of Proposition 13". No one got it. When asked what that meant I'd just mutter under my breath, "Pray to J I get the same ol' same ol'."

sarongsong
2007-Mar-27, 05:07 AM
...There was "nothing to be concerned about," Dennis Quinton of the New Jersey Department of Homeland Security...Oh, I'm re-assured now...http://bautforum.com/images/icons/icon7.gif
...The group's final travel destination is Montreal...Wonder if the Canadian equivalent of the CDC will check them out again.

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-27, 07:16 AM
Roger, Roger. (I just bought that movie a couple of weeks ago, too.)
Ah, good. It's been quite a long time since I last saw it.
Would you (anybody) please remind me why Striker was unable to
land the plane, requiring the Ottopilot to take over?

I have an idea for a short little scene that really ought to have been
in the movie, but just sticking it in would cause a bit of a continuity
problem... if that matters.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2007-Mar-27, 07:21 AM
Ah, good. It's been quite a long time since I last saw it.
Would you (anybody) please remind me why Striker was unable to
land the plane, requiring the Ottopilot to take over?

He did land the plane. Otto took over for a while in midair, and he took the plane away at the end, but the landing was manual.

Maksutov
2007-Mar-27, 07:40 AM
He did land the plane. Otto took over for a while in midair,It was scary when when Otto's ego was deflated, but fortunately Julie Hagerty knew (with help from the ground) what to do. The no-smoking rule that's now common would have spoiled the next scene.
and he took the plane away at the end, but the landing was manual.I thought Manuel was the fellow who hot-wired the lunar shuttle in Airplane II: The Sequel.

Donnie B.
2007-Mar-27, 12:17 PM
Would you (anybody) please remind me why Striker was unable to land the plane, requiring the Ottopilot to take over?I believe it had something to do with his drinking problem. :sick:

Swift
2007-Mar-27, 12:50 PM
Roger, Roger. (I just bought that movie a couple of weeks ago, too.)
Ted Striker: Surely you can't be serious.
Rumack: I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-27, 01:32 PM
Ted Striker: Surely you can't be serious.
Rumack: I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

I thought it was ". . . and stop calling me Shirley."

closetgeek
2007-Mar-27, 01:34 PM
Ain't no thang!

The fellow in the taxi was one patient person at the terminal. Or was he a terminal patient?

All I know is I used to have a frame grab of Robert Stack punching out one of the Hare Krishnas as a screen saver. It was subtitled "The Aftereffects of Proposition 13". No one got it. When asked what that meant I'd just mutter under my breath, "Pray to J I get the same ol' same ol'."

closetgeek
2007-Mar-27, 01:36 PM
The statement is repeated in Airplane. I am pretty sure the original statement is "..and don't call me Shirley."

I thought it was ". . . and stop calling me Shirley."

crosscountry
2007-Mar-27, 02:25 PM
darn, now I have to find that movie!

BlueEagle
2007-Mar-27, 04:24 PM
The fellow in the taxi was one patient person at the terminal. Or was he a terminal patient?"
I believe he was Howard Jarvis, father of the California "property tax revolt". (one of the strangest casting choices ever). I think he was buried in that taxi ;)

Frantic Freddie
2007-Mar-27, 05:16 PM
An Airplane thread....


Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue.

weatherc
2007-Mar-27, 05:18 PM
"How about some coffee, Johnny?"

"No, thanks."

Roving Philosopher
2007-Mar-27, 06:09 PM
Doctor: Captain, how soon can you land?
Captain: I can't tell
Doctor: You can tell me. I'm a doctor.
Captain: No. I mean I'm just not sure.
Doctor: Well, can't you take a guess?
Captain: Well, not for another two hours.
Doctor: You can't take a guess for another two hours?

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-27, 06:17 PM
The statement is repeated in Airplane. I am pretty sure the original statement is "..and don't call me Shirley."

Jeez, one of my favorite lines, and I've been doing it all wrong!

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-27, 07:08 PM
Here's the scene I think should have been in Airplane!

Ted Striker is in the pilot's seat and stewardess Elaine is
standing supportively at his shoulder.

Ted (Looking thoughtful):
"I just remembered something... "
(Closeup on Ted)
"I've never landed a plane before. Every mission I flew, I was
shot down. The only way I've landed is with a parachute."
(Cut to closeup of Elaine)
Elaine (Glancing around cockpit):
"Do you have your parachute with you now?"
(Cut back to closeup of Ted)
Ted:
"No.... It's back in the passenger cabin."
(Cut to very brief medium shot of Elaine rapidly exiting the cockpit)
(Jump cut to Elaine in the middle of the aisle in the passenger
cabin, rapidly pulling items from the overhead rack (above camera)
and tossing them aside (items might include a KFC tub and a live
chicken) until she finds Striker's WW2-era parachute pack, pulls it
down from the rack, and straps it on over her standard stewardess
uniform of white shirt and blue A-line skirt, with the swift expertise
of a paratrooper commando who has done it a thousand times.)

I don't know what happens after that. Maybe the passengers
convince her not to jump. Or one of the passengers takes the
parachute away from her for her own protection, then uses it
himself. Or maybe he throws the parachute out and the other
passengers, angry at him, throw him out after it.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Lurking Nerd
2007-Mar-28, 02:20 AM
Just checked on the DVD and it is "...and don't call me Shirley."

Is this line also in the sequel? I couldn't find it by doing a quick scan so if it is in there it may be worded just a tad different.

Whirlpool
2007-Mar-28, 03:14 AM
The fellow in the taxi was one patient person at the terminal. Or was he a terminal patient?

All I know is I used to have a frame grab of Robert Stack punching out one of the Hare Krishnas as a screen saver. It was subtitled "The Aftereffects of Proposition 13". No one got it. When asked what that meant I'd just mutter under my breath, "Pray to J I get the same ol' same ol'."

That is funny.

:lol: :p

Gillianren
2007-Mar-28, 07:32 AM
. . . standard stewardess
uniform of white shirt and blue A-line skirt . . . .

[girl moment]I don't think they were A-line skirts. I'm pretty sure they were pencil-cut skirts.[/girl moment]

orphia nay
2007-Mar-28, 07:41 AM
darn, now I have to find that movie!


Me too! I've never actually watched it, although I've heard so many quotes from it over the years. I'm sure that when I do watch it, it will be one of those films in which other lines will seem familiar that I didn't know were from the film.

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-28, 08:33 AM
[girl moment]I don't think they were A-line skirts. I'm pretty sure
they were pencil-cut skirts.[/girl moment]
I've never seen or heard the term "pencil-cut" before, and couldn't
find much in a couple of web searches. Can you provide any info?
I dunno where I picked up the term "A-line", but it was long, long
ago, in a mind far, far away... I visualize the classic mid-60's
stewardess's skirt as coming down to the top or middle of the knee,
and tight enough to look illegal but not so tight as to be impossible to
walk in. A good example would be the attire of Cheryl Bigelow, in sixth
grade. Although she was more noteable for her highly-advanced upper
body development... She supported her skirt (whatever it was called)
with suspenders, which had significant obstacles to surmount between
waist and shoulders... That's Cheryl Bigelow, lived at the corner of
43rd and Fremont near Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. Went to Barton
elementary school. Haven't seen her since sixth grade.

What was we talking about?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Whirlpool
2007-Mar-28, 09:09 AM
I've never seen or heard the term "pencil-cut" before, and couldn't
find much in a couple of web searches. Can you provide any info?
I dunno where I picked up the term "A-line", but it was long, long
ago, in a mind far, far away... I visualize the classic mid-60's
stewardess's skirt as coming down to the top or middle of the knee,
and tight enough to look illegal but not so tight as to be impossible to
walk in. A good example would be the attire of Cheryl Bigelow, in sixth
grade. Although she was more noteable for her highly-advanced upper
body development... She supported her skirt (whatever it was called)
with suspenders, which had significant obstacles to surmount between
waist and shoulders... That's Cheryl Bigelow, lived at the corner of
43rd and Fremont near Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. Went to Barton
elementary school. Haven't seen her since sixth grade.

What was we talking about?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


LOL.

"Pencil-Cut" Skirts are those like the cut of the pencil , its narrowed down from hips to upper knees. Usually the length is 2-3 inches above knee.
It's where women walks on a straight-line , its a sexy cut .
Gives out and emphasize the hips of a woman.

;):p

korjik
2007-Mar-28, 02:39 PM
good luck, we're all counting on you

Van Rijn
2007-Mar-28, 08:31 PM
I believe he was Howard Jarvis, father of the California "property tax revolt". (one of the strangest casting choices ever). I think he was buried in that taxi ;)

Jarvis was all over the news in California during the proposition 13/property tax control period. His 15 minutes of fame are long over, but if you were here at that time, his face is instantly recognizable.

Gillianren
2007-Mar-28, 09:51 PM
LOL.

"Pencil-Cut" Skirts are those like the cut of the pencil , its narrowed down from hips to upper knees. Usually the length is 2-3 inches above knee.
It's where women walks on a straight-line , its a sexy cut .
Gives out and emphasize the hips of a woman.

;):p

Quite right. An A-line flares out like a capital letter "A," which those skirts clearly don't. A-lines are usually dresses, too.

Moose
2007-Mar-28, 09:55 PM
Pencil-cut, huh? I've always liked those (on women, you wiseguys), although they look tough to walk in.

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-29, 12:35 AM
Has the term "pencil-cut" been around a while or is it relatively new?
(Anything after 1971 would be "relatively new" for me.)

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Frantic Freddie
2007-Mar-29, 12:56 AM
Good luck,we're all counting on you....

Gillianren
2007-Mar-29, 01:34 AM
Has the term "pencil-cut" been around a while or is it relatively new?
(Anything after 1971 would be "relatively new" for me.)

Heh. Since I was born in '76, I couldn't tell you if it's new since '71 off the top of my head. However, it has been around a while by my standards. And, yes, they can be a real pain to walk in.

Maksutov
2007-Mar-29, 01:42 AM
Perhaps a few illustrations would help here.

Pencil-cut dress. (http://www.americanapparel.net/storefront/images/detail/serve.asp?media=rsa8342_Red.jpg)

Pencil-cut skirt. (http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000NG1QWM.01-A19NO891BK0708._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_V44180218_.jpg)

mike alexander
2007-Mar-29, 02:39 AM
And a pencil cut pencil, for comparison

http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/2995/penciltif2jq4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Maksutov
2007-Mar-29, 02:45 AM
And a pencil cut pencil, for comparison...
Robotic version. (http://www.dick-blick.com/items/206/53/20653-2020-1-2ww-m.jpg)

Frantic Freddie
2007-Mar-29, 03:08 AM
Good luck,we're all counting on you...

Whirlpool
2007-Mar-29, 03:15 AM
I think "pencil-cut" dress and skirt has been already used by women in the 60's, although not 2-3 inches above the knee , but its 2-3 inches below the knee. Still quite conservative.

;)

Maksutov
2007-Mar-29, 04:39 AM
Good luck,we're all counting on you...http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/8126/leslienielsen2un4.th.jpg (http://img88.imageshack.us/my.php?image=leslienielsen2un4.jpg)

Maksutov
2007-Mar-29, 04:41 AM
I think "pencil-cut" dress and skirt has been already used by women in the 60's, although not 2-3 inches above the knee , but its 2-3 inches below the knee. Still quite conservative.

;)If the skirts got any shorter than they were c. 1967-68, they would have been renamed "belts".

http://img394.imageshack.us/img394/4879/iconbiggrin1kg.gif

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-29, 04:49 AM
Pencil-cut dress. (http://www.americanapparel.net/storefront/images/detail/serve.asp?media=rsa8342_Red.jpg)
That's what I'd generically call a "sheath dress". With some variant
of halter top.



Pencil-cut skirt. (http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000NG1QWM.01-A19NO891BK0708._AA280_SCLZZZZZZZ_V44180218_.jpg)
I think that's a photo I found with Google, but I could only get the
thumbnail. Probably the website requires a recent-version browser.

Hmmm. I believe I've clicked that first link and closed the window
again five times, now.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-29, 05:22 AM
Has the term "pencil-cut" been around a while or is it relatively new?
(Anything after 1971 would be "relatively new" for me.)
Heh. Since I was born in '76,
You are relatively new.



I couldn't tell you if it's new since '71 off the top of my head.
Off the top of your head?? Did you go and get a pencil cut without
asking me first?



However, it has been around a while by my standards. And, yes,
they can be a real pain to walk in.
I find it hard to believe that stewardesses were ever required to wear
something that would significantly and unnecessarily restrict mobility.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Jeff Root
2007-Mar-29, 06:08 AM
If the skirts got any shorter than they
were c. 1967-68, they would have been renamed "belts".
That would be Tina Liebling, in junior high school. She really
didn't have the right shape to wear such things, but she always
wore the shortest imaginable skirts. It is not hyperbole to say
that the horizontal dimension exceeded the vertical dimension.
She had very short legs, yet her skirts ended way above the knee.
She must have made them herself. I don't know what happend
if and when she ever sat down. We were in the same grade but
didn't have any classes together.

By a freakish coincidence, I see that she also lived on Fremont
Avenue, though several miles away from previously-referenced
Cheryl Bigelow. Tina lived at 1805 Fremont, according to my
1967-68 U High Buzz Book.

Another friend at U High, Paul Chacon, wrote a science fiction
story in which a woman was surreptitiously breaking the law by
wearing a transparent belt on a planet where clothing was forbidden.
The belt held a gem which appeared to casual observers to be fixed
in her navel. Last I heard, Paul was in the Math department at a
university in Colorado.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Gillianren
2007-Mar-29, 06:54 AM
I find it hard to believe that stewardesses were ever required to wear
something that would significantly and unnecessarily restrict mobility.

I don't. I find it quite easy to believe if it would simultaneously attract male customers, traditionally (especially in business during the '70s) the ones with money. I also find it easy to believe that the women were never asked how easily they could move in those skirts.

Actually, sometimes, they get little tiny pleats in the back at the bottom (kick pleats) that in theory make it easier to move. However, people who believe that it does to any substantial degree are wrong.

crosscountry
2007-Mar-29, 09:29 AM
not only that - their job required them to walk down narrow isles Far outweighing any problem in mobility. Dress for the job.

swansont
2007-Mar-29, 10:58 AM
Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Mar-29, 12:40 PM
I find it hard to believe that stewardesses were ever required to wear something that would significantly and unnecessarily restrict mobility.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

My wife was a stew for about 10 years, for Pan Am then NWA. They were OK for walking, as long as a person didn't try to take big steps, and forget about running. Mobility was not one of the intentions of the design.

Swift
2007-Mar-29, 02:09 PM
Lady: Nervous?
Ted Striker: Yes.
Lady: First time?
Ted Striker: No, I've been nervous lots of times.

Noclevername
2007-Apr-19, 04:36 AM
Miss, I speak jive.

LurchGS
2007-Apr-19, 05:00 AM
coom-bai-yah...

I want every light we've got on that field!

Maksutov
2007-May-21, 05:08 AM
http://img263.imageshack.us/img263/8586/airplanewereallcountingwu8.th.jpg (http://img263.imageshack.us/my.php?image=airplanewereallcountingwu8.jpg)

I just want to tell you both good luck. We're all counting on you.