PDA

View Full Version : What should we do next?



spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-12, 01:28 AM
Over the past five years Spacecraft Films DVD sets have covered manned space missions from Mercury through the Apollo Lunar Missions, several launch vehicles and other topics of interest. Now that these areas are covered, (and we're working on Skylab, ASTP and others) what would you like to see next? (You can see what we've done so far at www.spacecraftfilms.com).

Unmanned missions? The Shuttle missions? Other topics we haven't mentioned?

Best,
Mark

AGN Fuel
2007-Apr-12, 03:41 AM
Over the past five years Spacecraft Films DVD sets have covered manned space missions from Mercury through the Apollo Lunar Missions, several launch vehicles and other topics of interest. Now that these areas are covered, (and we're working on Skylab, ASTP and others) what would you like to see next? (You can see what we've done so far at www.spacecraftfilms.com) (http://www.spacecraftfilms.com)).

Unmanned missions? The Shuttle missions? Other topics we haven't mentioned?

Best,
Mark


Hi Mark,

I don't have any particular preference at the moment. However, I did not want to waste the opportunity to thank you for the extraordinary work that you have done in making these films available to the general public all around the world (including us Aussies!).

You have made these irreplaceable records easily accessible, to remind us again of the remarkable adventures of the early days of space travel. I think I speak for many here when I say that we are in your debt.

(Actually - what I would love to see is footage of the early Soviet missions. I don't know how available that might be however!)

Kevn
2007-Apr-12, 04:59 AM
I know it's unmanned and all, but what about one on the Hubble Space Telescope?

Manchurian Taikonaut
2007-Apr-12, 07:19 AM
Thanks for your post Mark at spaceflightfilm

I would like very much if you covered why the planet Mars has always been 10 years away for a manned destination even during the Apollo years,
and perhaps Mars will continue to be ten years away for another 20-30 years for mankind

Perhaps you could speculate as to why Russia scrapped the Energia/Marpost mission, was it as a result of the fall of the USSR ? and maybe you could cover why George Bush Senior's Space Exploration Initiative failed ( Father of George W. Bush 43rd President)

JMV
2007-Apr-12, 12:38 PM
Just the other day I wished there was a DVD set that covered NASA's lifting bodies, M2-F1/2/3, HL-10 and X-24, in a similar fashion to your X-15 set. That wouldn't be a spacecraftfilm though. Aircraftfilms perhaps? Would there be enough demand for this?

Jason Thompson
2007-Apr-12, 01:22 PM
Two things I'd really like to see, although I'm not sure how easy they'd be to produce:

Soviet Space. I'd love to see something that gathers whatever film from the Soviet Space program there is in one place. I've seen short clips all over the place. I'd like to see more of the N-1 rocket. The little chapter on the Mercury DVD is a brilliant teaser. Please tell us there's more!

TV spots. Probably a bit more expensive and difficult to licence, I'd guess, but I'd like to see some of the news reports or special shows about the early space program. I enjoyed the radio programs used as audio on the Mercury DVD set, and I loved the Mission To The Moon set. Are there more shows like that?

Don't release them too quickly though: I still haven't caught up with the current back-catalogue!

spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-12, 02:41 PM
Just the other day I wished there was a DVD set that covered NASA's lifting bodies, M2-F1/2/3, HL-10 and X-24, in a similar fashion to your X-15 set. That wouldn't be a spacecraftfilm though. Aircraftfilms perhaps? Would there be enough demand for this?

We do have plans for this subject. Some of this will be covered with our Space Shuttles: First Flights DVD set, due to the contribution of the lifting bodies to the development process of shuttle. The good news there is that there is a good possibility that we'll do these transfers in HD. I would expect the lifting bodies project to be a possible addition to our late-year releases.

Mark

spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-12, 02:46 PM
Soviet Space. I'd love to see something that gathers whatever film from the Soviet Space program there is in one place. I've seen short clips all over the place. I'd like to see more of the N-1 rocket.

TV spots. I enjoyed the radio programs used as audio on the Mercury DVD set, and I loved the Mission To The Moon set. Are there more shows like that?


I'm using the production of the ASTP set coming up as a look to see how deeply we can go into Soviet space. I'd love to do some of the same things that we've done with US space, but don't know how difficult it will be to get to the raw footage. It must be somewhere, though!

We kind of stumbled on the Mission to the Moon stuff. It suddenly appeared at the archives. MIT didn't even have a copy. I sent a copy to the host of the show, who didn't have copies. We're always looking for these, and when we find the little gems we'll release them. The upcoming Air Force Manned Space Projects disc is like that - material we've run across over the years we thought we'd release.

Mark

spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-12, 02:52 PM
Here are some other projects we've considered:

An anti-moon-hoax DVD. Just so you can reach for something to easily debunk these people with something on TV - something they can understand. (Even though they will refuse to do so.)

A set on the history of the spacewalk, including space suit development.

Unmanned missions, probably grouped by planet.

Launch vehicle families - Thor/Delta, Atlas, Titan, perhaps even some of the ICBMs (that weren't used for other things, Minuteman, Polaris, etc.)

Biographies of notable space history personalities, von Braun, etc. and perhaps astros as well.

Hubble is one that we will probably do just as soon as the last servicing mission is complete.

Other ideas?

Oh, and thanks for the kind words and support.

Mark

Jason Thompson
2007-Apr-12, 03:12 PM
An anti-moon-hoax DVD. Just so you can reach for something to easily debunk these people with something on TV - something they can understand. (Even though they will refuse to do so.)

I'm not sure about this. On the one hand it would be handy to offer to some people. On the other, there are so many hoax arguments that unless you are going to put lectures on physics, rocket propulsion, camera design, photography and other such subjects there won't be anything to really dent the serious hoax believer. Also, as you point out, the true hoax believer won't care what's on your DVD. I have already seen one person claim that your Apollo 11 DVD was put out as damage control after Sibrel released his first video.

The simplest arguments, like no stars and non-parallel shadows, are best debunked not by another DVD but by getting someone to do some work themselves. Personally, when it comes to debunking, I'm happy to have the raw fotage available so I can say with certainty that the flag only moves when being touched, or the footage looks silly if you speed it all up, or that I've seen successful flights of the LLxV, and show that if pressed on the subject.

So I guess, to be honest, I'd rather see your sterling work carry on in the way it has been so far, rather than try to put together a DVD that won't convince those it's meant to debunk and isn't needed by those of us who already know the truth.


A set on the history of the spacewalk, including space suit development.

Unmanned missions, probably grouped by planet.

Launch vehicle families - Thor/Delta, Atlas, Titan, perhaps even some of the ICBMs (that weren't used for other things, Minuteman, Polaris, etc.)

Biographies of notable space history personalities, von Braun, etc. and perhaps astros as well.

Hubble is one that we will probably do just as soon as the last servicing mission is complete.

Love all those ideas. I'm just a complete junkie when it comes to the film and video from this stuff. I was surprised when I got the Mercury set just how held my attention was by sections such as the couch moulding or suit evaluation, stuff I thought sounded really quite dull when I first got the set. I just love all that old film. :)


Oh, and thanks for the kind words and support.

Mark

You're very welcome. That material is a national and even international treasure. I'm pleased to be able to have it in my collection.

NEOWatcher
2007-Apr-12, 03:23 PM
I'm not sure about this. On the one hand it would be handy to offer to some people. On the other, there are so many hoax arguments that unless you are going to put lectures on physics, rocket propulsion, camera design, photography and other such subjects there won't be anything to really dent the serious hoax believer.
I on the other hand, am sure on this. The HB'rs will never be convinced, debunked, or otherwise correctly debated, so I really don't care what the view or relationship related to them is.
The general public, however, has no corresponding information opposing these people. It is for the general public, and science sake in general that this would be good for.

I for one am a firm believer in the history, but I have learned a great deal of physics and the like from the debunking. I'm sure a great deal of people would like to know how it was done.

Maybe to your point about trying it themselves, maybe the DVD can have bonus extras in experiments you can do at home.

So; not so much that it debunks the HB's, but more that it is a coherent form of presenting scientific concepts. After all, the Mythbusters teach science based on woo-woo ideas in the same manner.

Larry Jacks
2007-Apr-12, 08:43 PM
I think a set of DVDs about the various unmanned missions would be a valuable addition to your product line. You could approach the subject in a variety of ways. For example, you could take a look at the different missions sent to a specific planet showing the evolution of capabilities from the early fly-by missions through orbiters and landers where appropriate. Or, you could take one big mission like the Voyager flights and cover it from beginning to end. There's a lot of video reuse possibilities between the two approaches making it less expensive to produce both types of DVDs.

Donnie B.
2007-Apr-14, 02:29 PM
I like a number of the ideas already raised, especially the one about the news coverage of manned spaceflight.

Here's an idea I haven't seen so far. While we've made many great achievements in the space program, we've also had setbacks. How about a DVD (or series) that covers the greatest disasters? -- not in an exploitative way, but to show the things that led up to them, what actually caused them, how the programs and public responded, and the lessons learned/applied. My list would include the "Apollo 1" fire, Apollo 13, Challenger, and Columbia. It might be good to include the Soviet failures as well. The theme could be extended to include unmanned failures also.

It's a truism that we generally learn more from our mistakes than our successes. The same holds true for the space program. Done well, this DVD (or series) could have a market beyond us space aficionados; you might find it would be of interest to the professional Project Management folks as well.

spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-15, 01:12 AM
We already have sets on Challenger and Apollo 1 (Challenger was released last year, Apollo 1 gets released April 18). The Challenger set is quite comprehensive, as is the Apollo 1 set. We'll address Columbia after a little more time has elapsed.

Challenger is a 3-DVD set, Apollo 1 is a 1-DVD set.

Mark
www.spacecraftfilms.com

Jason Thompson
2007-Apr-16, 04:11 PM
And just to add to that, Apollo 13 has its own 3-DVD set from Spacecraft Films as well. It's thoroughly excellent.

Jim Lovell and Fred Haise were very interested when I presented the inlay for them to sign at Autographica in March, and Sy Liebergot was good enough to sign it too....

Donnie B.
2007-Apr-16, 05:56 PM
I wasn't aware of the Challenger and Apollo 1 sets. I do know about Apollo 13, but (without having seen it) I assume it covers the mission overall, rather than focusing on the actual problem and what caused it (though that may well be included too).

What I was suggesting (in particular) was a DVD or set that deals with the process of "working the problem" -- determining what went wrong, why it went wrong, and what was done about it. Maybe that's not your area of interest, but I like that sort of thing. For example, see the book "Why Buildings Fall Down". For space-related examples, there are the sections on the F1 engine problems, Apollo 1, and Apollo 13 in "Apollo: The Race to the Moon".

Here's another related idea (please forgive me if this already exists or is covered in existing sets): how about a set focused on "mission control" -- the MOCR and backrooms that worked the flights? We typically think of them in relation to Apollo 13, but they're mostly anonymous otherwise. There's a pretty interesting history of how and why the MOCR developed and I'm not sure it's ever been given the spotlight it deserves.

Count Zero
2007-Apr-17, 04:41 AM
I'd like to put in my vote for a Soviet set.

One of the things that really facinated me about the Mighty Saturn set was the "Progress Reports" collection. Are these available for the LM & CSM also? I know that Grumman filmed a lot of the testing and construction of the LM. I would like to see more of this material.

Thank you for the work you've put in so far. You keep makin' 'em, I'll keep buyin' 'em!

spacecraftfilms
2007-Apr-18, 08:08 PM
Thanks for the input. Per the above mentioned sets the Apollo 1 DVDs are now available.

I really hope to do more on the Soviet programs. I have found some material, but not near enough. As we get closer to the ASTP set we'll see what we can come up with.

Best,
Mark

publiusr
2007-Apr-27, 10:17 PM
Have a relationship with Http://www.buran-energia.com ?