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Gillianren
2007-Apr-18, 08:20 PM
Okay, folks. Let's get this started. Something not too easy, but not too hard.


I turned my head away unhappily, but the rows of books tugged unrepentantly at the edges of my sight. I walked like one bewitched to the nearest shelf. "I didn't know there were so many books in the world," I said caressingly, and [the other character's] answer was heard only in my ear and did not register in my brain: "Well, in fact, there aren't," he said.

That's a nice, appropriate quote to start with.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-18, 08:28 PM
Neil Gaiman? Sounds like the Sandman thing with loads of books that nearly were...

And yes, it is nice and appropriate, even if my guess is wrong!

(Added)

It also reminds me a bit of the lovely Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Luis Zafon.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-18, 11:00 PM
Your guess is wrong. It predates Sandman.

And yeah, I looked over my shelves and thought, "Hey, that's got that bit about the books! I'll use that!"

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-18, 11:09 PM
Gene Wolfe's The Shadow of the Torturer predates Sandman, and it's arguably as much fantasy as SF. But although there is a scene in a huge library, I don't think the dialogue is quite like that - and I've read it three times!

Gillianren
2007-Apr-19, 12:50 AM
Still no.

Van Rijn
2007-Apr-19, 01:34 AM
I don't usually like to get into these threads, but I'll just throw out that to my limited fantasy reading that sounds like it could be a reference to the Unseen University's library. So, a Pratchet book perhaps, no clue as to which.

I do remember reading a short story about an infinite library as well, but I don't remember the name of the story or the author.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-19, 02:43 AM
The writing style is all wrong for Pratchett, I think. (I mean, I know it isn't Pratchett. I'm just saying.)

It's not a short story, either, nor is it really about the library.

Van Rijn
2007-Apr-19, 04:00 AM
Well, I can't think of anything else even vaguely like that then.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-19, 07:49 AM
The writing style is all wrong for Pratchett, I think. (I mean, I know it isn't Pratchett. I'm just saying.)

It's not a short story, either, nor is it really about the library.
Definitely not Pratchett. Pratchett does have inner monologue, but it's written in the third person.

mike alexander
2007-Apr-19, 05:43 PM
I first thought of Borges and "The Library of Babel", but there's no dialog there.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-20, 06:30 AM
Well, here's a hint--it's by a woman. (Actually, a woman is speaking as well, but there it is.)

For a second hint, if you knew the name of the character whose name I didn't say, you'd know the other character's name and therefore the name of the book.

ToSeek
2007-Apr-20, 04:11 PM
Guessing, mostly based on the hints: Tehanu, by Ursula LeGuin?

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-20, 04:25 PM
Guessing, mostly based on the hints: Tehanu, by Ursula LeGuin?
Ooh, reckon that's a good guess. Wish I could find it to confirm :think:

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-20, 05:01 PM
If ToSeek is right, is the "he" Sparrowhawk?

(I've only read the first book in the series.)

ggremlin
2007-Apr-20, 05:05 PM
Something by Andre Norton perhaps?

Gillianren
2007-Apr-20, 09:38 PM
Nope, not Le Guin. Another quote:


I was the youngest of three daughters. Our literal-minded mother named us Grace, Hope, and Honour, but few people except perhaps the minister who baptized all three of us remembered my given name.

It's the first two sentences of the book.

ToSeek
2007-Apr-21, 03:57 AM
I figured out the answer by Googling. Another 18 hours with no correct answer, and I'm going to spill it.

Serenitude
2007-Apr-21, 04:19 AM
I'm still utterly stumped...

Van Rijn
2007-Apr-21, 04:30 AM
I figured out the answer by Googling.

Same here (I found it this afternoon), but I'm afraid I am not familiar with this author.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-21, 04:56 AM
She's one of my favourites, and this is one of her best. I'm sadly disappointed that more of you haven't read her work.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-21, 08:03 AM
I've never read anything by her.:(

Gillianren
2007-Apr-21, 09:40 AM
Well, now, you should! She's written quite a few excellent novels and some decent collections of short stories. (Her most recent story collection was written with her husband, whose stories aren't as good as hers.) In fact, some of the details from this book were used in a movie based on the source material that came out in '91--including, in fact, the library.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-21, 10:42 AM
The only ones I can immediately think of whose husbands wrote too are Joan D. Vinge and C.L. Moore.

Oh, and Leigh Brackett, but she wasn't really fantasy.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-21, 12:08 PM
Still no, I'm afraid. Looks like the Googlers will have to take it. And all of you clearly have some reading to do--not that I haven't acquired a huge "to-read" list from hanging out around here.

Dr Nigel
2007-Apr-21, 08:42 PM
This is a bit of a stab in the dark, based solely on writing style: something by Sheri S. Tepper?

ToSeek
2007-Apr-21, 11:11 PM
Beauty, by Robin McKinley, which sits upon our bookshelves, though I haven't read it (presumably my wife has, though).

I'm going to do an easy one in order to pass the buck (since I didn't really earn this one). However, you have to name the book, the author, and the referenced character, and Gillian is not allowed to respond because I'm sure she knows all this off the top of her head:


Her bosom rose and fell like an empire.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-22, 09:44 PM
I'm pretty sure I do, yes--I'm quite sure that book's sitting on my shelf right now, not ten feet away.

ToSeek
2007-Apr-23, 01:14 AM
I'm pretty sure I do, yes--I'm quite sure that book's sitting on my shelf right now, not ten feet away.

About the same here (but then the McKinley book is sitting about two shelves up, for all the good it did).

I'll give it another 24 hours, and then you can take it back. Let's hope we don't end up playing ping-pong here.

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-23, 10:29 AM
Well I'm pretty sure that it's Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett and the bosom in question is, ahem, Lady Ramkin's :D Hey! that's the only one I've seen the play of, with the excellent Paul Darrow as Captain Vimes :)

ToSeek
2007-Apr-23, 01:02 PM
Well I'm pretty sure that it's Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett and the bosom in question is, ahem, Lady Ramkin's :D Hey! that's the only one I've seen the play of, with the excellent Paul Darrow as Captain Vimes :)

It is indeed. Your go. (I would love to see Pratchett done on stage, but unfortunately his popularity isn't sufficient for that on this side of the Atlantic.)

CJSF
2007-Apr-23, 01:16 PM
There's a Discworld PLAY? Man, I've been disconnected...

CJSF

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-23, 01:50 PM
There's a Discworld PLAY? Man, I've been disconnected...

CJSF
Quite a few, in fact.

Years ago my wife and I went to see Mort at our local theatre. According to the bill it was performed by a youth group or something, so we were expecting late teens and early 20s. Turned out it was schoolchildren. (The head teacher played Death.)

It was entertaining, and it would be very churlish to dismiss the acting skills of schoolkids who were doing their best. But it was very much a school play, and we hadn't expected that.

At the same venue a few years later, we saw Weird Sisters, which was done extremely well. The only thing was, nobody was laughing at the jokes. I felt sorry for the actors, especially the woman who played Granny Weatherwax, because I knew her. The thing was, I think we were all getting into the story (and consequently enjoying it) but the jokes have been copied by others since the book came out, and consequently they are too familiar to have audiences rolling in the aisles.

[Snip an addition that would probably annoy people because it mentions a fantasy novel that someone is bound to want to quote.]

Jeff Root
2007-Apr-23, 02:07 PM
There's almost no chance that I would would be able to identify any
quote that anyone will post here, so I'll just barge in and post one,
myself.


...mirrors and copulation are abominable, since they both multiply
the numbers of man.
-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-23, 03:28 PM
There's almost no chance that I would would be able to identify any
quote that anyone will post here, so I'll just barge in and post one,
myself.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis
You'd be surprised - I never thought I'd get one for at least several pages, but then, as ToSeek said, it was relatively easy :)
I haven't a clue about yours but I want to post one too while I have the chance. Fight it out amongst yourselves who answers what & posts next (Sorry Gillianren) :)

This is an old favourite of mine & one of the 1st contemporary fantasy books I ever read (recently interested to hear it's to made into a film!):

He stretched out his right hand with its fingers spread stiff towards his family, and saw them instantly caught into a stop in time, frozen out of all movement. Like waxworks they stood stiff and motionless round the room.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-23, 08:43 PM
It is indeed. Your go. (I would love to see Pratchett done on stage, but unfortunately his popularity isn't sufficient for that on this side of the Atlantic.)

It is in Seattle, I think, but we still haven't been that fortunate. (The man himself says that the biggest crowds he gets for his book signings in the US are at UW.)

mike alexander
2007-Apr-23, 10:05 PM
Gillianren wrote:
(The man himself says that the biggest crowds he gets for his book signings in the US are at UW.)

I'd be willing to drive up to UW to sign one of his books.

SeanF
2007-Apr-24, 01:51 PM
I'd be willing to drive up to UW to sign one of his books.
Why? Seems to me you could sign one of his books right where you are...

;)

Dr Nigel
2007-Apr-24, 05:54 PM
This is an old favourite of mine & one of the 1st contemporary fantasy books I ever read (recently interested to hear it's to made into a film!):

Quote:
He stretched out his right hand with its fingers spread stiff towards his family, and saw them instantly caught into a stop in time, frozen out of all movement. Like waxworks they stood stiff and motionless round the room.



I haven't a clue. Any chance of a hint?

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-24, 07:17 PM
I haven't a clue. Any chance of a hint?
Of course. British authoress. Series of 5 children/young adult's books. Waaay before Harry Potter! :)
Name the book or the series, same thing. 'Water from the thaw'.

Dr Nigel
2007-Apr-24, 08:13 PM
Still not really sure. Maybe something by Diana Wynn Jones?

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-24, 08:55 PM
Still not really sure. Maybe something by Diana Wynn Jones?
No. Hmmn not heard of her, will have to research :)
Ok, this is totally getting into Google territory but don't want to bog down the thread:


'Fire in the candle ring, water from the thaw
Six signs the circle, and the grail gone before'.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-24, 10:27 PM
E. Nesbit? I haven't read much of her.

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-24, 10:39 PM
E. Nesbit? I haven't read much of her.
No, not her either.
And I thought this would be fairly easy :o

Jeff Root
2007-Apr-24, 11:55 PM
The quote I insinuated shouldn't be too hard, since part of the
identification has already appeared in this thread.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

ToSeek
2007-Apr-25, 02:39 AM
No. Hmmn not heard of her, will have to research :)
Ok, this is totally getting into Google territory but don't want to bog down the thread:

Diana Wynne Jones's Tough Guide to Fantasyland (may not have the title exactly right) is one of the funniest things you'll ever read.

Dr Nigel
2007-Apr-27, 08:38 PM
'Fire in the candle ring, water from the thaw
Six signs the circle, and the grail gone before'.

Would that be something by Marion Zimmer Bradley? I can't specify a book, because I 've never read any of her stuff.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-28, 09:46 AM
I've got a bit lost in this thread. Has anybody mentioned Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising sequence?

Roy Batty
2007-Apr-28, 03:18 PM
I've got a bit lost in this thread. Has anybody mentioned Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising sequence?

Thank goodness! Yes, spot on Paul. Your go, phew :)

Dr Nigel
2007-Apr-28, 07:19 PM
This at least explains why I couldn't work out the book. I had never even heard of Susan Cooper before today.

Gillianren
2007-Apr-28, 07:38 PM
I have, but she's on the long list of "books I need to get around to."

Paul Beardsley
2007-Apr-28, 08:13 PM
Thank goodness! Yes, spot on Paul. Your go, phew :)

Thanks Roy.

As I often do with the scifi quote, I'll provide two to increase the chances given that they are fairly obscure. Either one will do.


"It always happens during the hour after midnight. Between twelve and one in the morning. You can see the same phenomenon at several places in the city. Not many people know about it, and a number of those places I haven't seen myself, but it's a fact: during that hour a few buildings in Venice cast a reflection on the water that doesn't match reality. There are only tiny differences. Lights in windows, sometimes an extra door, people walking past buildings when there's no one really there."


"Yes, I found the place," said Falmer. "It's a queer sort of place, pretty much as the legends describe it." He spat quickly into the fire, as if the act of speech had been physically distasteful to him, and, half averting his face from the scrutiny of Thone, stared with morose and somber eyes into the jungle-matted Venezuelan darkness.

Gillianren
2007-May-01, 09:00 AM
Can we get a hint?

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-01, 09:24 AM
Okay. The first was from a trilogy that was only recently translated into English.

The second was from a short story from (I think) the 1930s.

mike alexander
2007-May-02, 07:50 PM
Almost unbelievably (since I've read little straight horror/fantasy), I am quite sure that the second one is by Clark Ashton Smith. It's a short story, with a man-eating plant. "The Seed of Doom" or something like that.

All that remains from a high-school memory...

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-04, 12:52 PM
Almost unbelievably (since I've read little straight horror/fantasy), I am quite sure that the second one is by Clark Ashton Smith. It's a short story, with a man-eating plant. "The Seed of Doom" or something like that.

All that remains from a high-school memory...
Close enough, Mike. It's "The Seeds from the Sepulchre", and you got the right author.

The other one is by a German author called Kai Meyer. The book is called The Flowing Queen over here in the UK, and The Water Mirror in the US. It's rather good; it's set in 1890, in a Venice where soldiers ride animated stone lions, where mermaids are treated as slaves, and where the Flowing Queen's power protects the lagoon from the besieging forces of the resurrected Pharaoh's army of undead mummies...

Dr Nigel
2007-May-04, 04:15 PM
I guess that means it's your go, Mike.

mike alexander
2007-May-04, 05:39 PM
OK. Let me get home and pull something. Y'all check back in a few hours.

mike alexander
2007-May-05, 03:25 AM
A quote:


Fine lines of light traced in the blackness-white, silver, blue, yellow, red-mainly straight, but sometimes wavering. They cross the entire field of darkness, and some were brighter than others...
Slowing, slowing...
Finally, the lines were no longer infinite roadways or strands of a web.
They were long thin rods-then sticks-hyphens of light...
Ultimately, they were winking points.

Dr Nigel
2007-May-05, 04:27 PM
Hmm - looks like another one I haven't read.

mike alexander
2007-May-06, 01:20 AM
The quote describes someone waking up.

SMEaton
2007-May-08, 03:37 AM
I think it's Roger Zelazny's Nine Princes In Amber when Corwin is waking up in the hospital.

mike alexander
2007-May-08, 05:47 AM
SMEaton wrote:


I think it's Roger Zelazny's Nine Princes In Amber when Corwin is waking up in the hospital.


Not quite, but hot hot hot. Correct author, though.

SMEaton
2007-May-08, 06:50 AM
Just including the word "Amber" ain't good enough? Dadblammit... "NPIA" didn't seem quite right (nor verifiable since I don't currently own any of the series), and so I'm stuck for the moment.

mike alexander
2007-May-08, 01:33 PM
Before Amber.


Of course, he thought, he has finally looked upon the sunrise and been freed...

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-08, 11:49 PM
Jack of Shadows, still Zelazny

mike alexander
2007-May-09, 12:56 AM
HenrikOlsen gets it. The games Zelazny played with words (and got away with). Baron Dreckheim. High Dudgeon. Loved it.

Your turn, Henrik.

Dr Nigel
2007-May-09, 07:28 AM
Hah! Shows how much I know. Guess what I'm re-reading just now? The Great Big Heavy Book of Amber (well, it's the omnibus, with all 10 Amber novels in one volume; I don't think that's its actual title, but I think it's more accurate).

And I didn't recognise RZ's prose style.

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-09, 03:56 PM
... or as it's recently been renamed: The size of the latest Potter book Book of Amber.

That you didn't recognize his style was because he essentially forgot about the wonders of language in the Amber books except for brief flashes when describing hellrides and Luke's LSD trip.

And that it wasn't his prose style, it was his impressionist style. :)

Now for the next quote

He pushed me to the ground, unto the leaves and the wrappers and the condom, and lowered himself on top of me. Then he raised his head, and opened his mouth, and ate my life with his strong sharp teeth.

mike alexander
2007-May-10, 12:17 AM
Whoa! I have no idea what the story is, but it sounds pretty hot.

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-11, 01:25 PM
The protagonist is male.

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-11, 08:31 PM
It's not Anne "I'm so deluded I believe I'm serious literature" Rice, is it?

mike alexander
2007-May-12, 03:48 AM
Even if the protagonist is male, it's still pretty hot. Very sensual without being dirty, if you get me.

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-12, 08:51 AM
Train of thought from what Mike said... Poppy Z. Brite?

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-13, 09:26 AM
None of the above, though in a bilingual pun Paul did get part of it.
The author is British (brite in Danish) :)

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-19, 08:48 AM
More quotes, the AI poll pushed this way back:(

From a different place in the story.

I was only seven, but it was daylight, and I do not remember being scared. It is good for children to find themselves facing the elements of a fairy tale - they are well equipped to deal with these.

Dr Nigel
2007-May-19, 09:30 AM
Is this one of the recent proliferation of vampire / werewolf supernatural fantasy / horror - type novels?

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-19, 10:56 AM
There's neither vampires nor werewolves in it, and just to prevent lots of false guesses, it's a short story.

Dr Nigel
2007-May-20, 01:20 PM
... it's a short story.

That puts me at a bit of a disadvantage, as I only rarely read short stories.

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-20, 10:04 PM
As an added hint, it's a retelling of an old fairytale, though no fae appears.

Dr Nigel
2007-May-22, 09:09 PM
Not Little Red Riding Hood?

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-23, 06:24 AM
No.
Actually I have to say I would have expected Gillianren to post the answer already, but I can understand not having time for everything.

Gillianren
2007-May-24, 06:44 AM
Oh, Gods. Is it that Stephen King story where the kid meets the Devil? It sounds awfully familiar, but you're right that I've been distracted these last nine or ten days.

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-24, 07:09 AM
Can't be King, Gillian - he said it was a British author. And male, which rules out Angela Carter.

Neil Gaiman is one who springs to mind. Has he been mentioned? It's been a while...

Gillianren
2007-May-24, 08:49 AM
Can't be King, Gillian - he said it was a British author. And male, which rules out Angela Carter.

Neil Gaiman is one who springs to mind. Has he been mentioned? It's been a while...

Oh, right. I did say I've been distracted. It does also read like Gaiman--I think a lot of people would be amazed at how alike those two can sound sometimes.

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-24, 05:17 PM
Gaiman it is, now for the story.

HenrikOlsen
2007-May-27, 12:39 PM
I'll be without internet for the next several days, so in order for this thread not to die completely, I'll say Paul Beardsley gets the next quote for getting the author right.

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-27, 01:27 PM
Thanks, Henrik. Are you going to tell us the title?

Here's mine:


"As you wish, so be it."

Spoken by the title character in this absolute classic.

Roy Batty
2007-May-27, 01:36 PM
You know, I pull this book off my so called 'bookshelf' every few years & read it. I don't know if it's the correct book as such, but I've got the Compleate Traveller in Black by John Brunner (who's Jagged Orbit I've read only slightly less often!). As you say, a definite absolute classic! :)

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-27, 02:08 PM
That's the one, Roy. A total joy to read and reread.

I might go on the discussion thread to talk about it some more when I have a spare few minutes.

Anyway, let's see what one you can offer, Roy.

Roy Batty
2007-May-30, 03:18 PM
ok, this one's about half a century old, but I'm hoping won't prove too hard:


Even as he stared at where she had been, {character} became aware of something going on furtively and silently around him. He looked round sharply and caught the hall in the act of emptying itself of furniture and rugs and pictures. They were not positively going, perhaps, but rather beginning to fail to be there.

mike alexander
2007-May-30, 10:04 PM
Maybe The Incomplete Enchanter by Sprague deCamp?

Roy Batty
2007-May-30, 10:35 PM
Nope. Actually I've realised I've posted a children's novel again, hope that doesn't slow it up. The characters name would probably be too big a clue!

mike alexander
2007-May-31, 01:44 AM
British author? There's something about the final sentence that sounds so, although I can't explain exactly why.

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-31, 07:37 AM
I don't know, but I like the quote.

The last bit slightly reminds me of a Samuel Beckett play (probably "All That Fall") where a character talks about a dying woman. "And the reason why she was dying was because she'd never been properly born." Eerie.

Gillianren
2007-May-31, 09:07 AM
I can't remember the author--let me check my database--Phillippa Pearce, Tom's Midnight Garden?

Paul Beardsley
2007-May-31, 11:11 AM
Oh yes - it does sound like that!

Roy Batty
2007-May-31, 04:42 PM
Well done Gillianren! it is indeed. I'm glad I found it in my books, I wanted to reread it since I saw the film adaptation a while back.

Gillianren
2007-May-31, 09:15 PM
Oh, I love that book. One of my books, an anthology of children's literature, contains a chapter, and the first chance I got, I bought the book.

Okay, give me a minute . . . .


"And there was other things--never a house-fire have we had hereabouts once she came into her powers, nor a barn-fire, and no accidents with fire either. If a cottager's baby tumbled into a fire, it tumbled right back out again, with just enough scorching on his smock to make his mama take better heed."

That's a chunk of dialogue, in case my punctuation doesn't make it clear.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-03, 05:26 AM
Hint time?

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-03, 10:32 PM
Well I'll guess Tehanu just to keep things moving, though I'm pretty sure it's not right :)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-04, 04:28 AM
Nope. It's a fairy tale retelling from within the last decade.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-07, 04:17 AM
Okay. Let's try another quote.


Where the High Priestess was all austerity, The Empress was all abundance. She was crowned with stars, with her foot on the quarter-moon that the High Priestess wore as a crown. She carried a heart in one hand, a scepter in the other. She was stunningly beautiful, and was surrounded by roses, and from the sensuality that infused even the slightest gesture, it was clear that she was as warmly emotional as the High Priestess was austere.

Now I read that, I realize the author did indeed use "austere" twice in one paragraph. Oh, well. I still really like the book, though the author's kind of uneven.

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-07, 03:44 PM
Okay. Let's try another quote.



Now I read that, I realize the author did indeed use "austere" twice in one paragraph. Oh, well. I still really like the book, though the author's kind of uneven.

Austerity & Austere, at the beginning & the end, they read ok to me in the context :)
But still absolutely no idea. A wild stab at the author; Sheri Tepper?

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-07, 06:41 PM
I might need a really, really heavy hint for that one, as I am utterly clueless at this juncture.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-07, 07:44 PM
It's Cinderella set during WWI; Roy's got the author wrong but they do have at least one thing in common.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-07, 11:04 PM
Austerity & Austere, at the beginning & the end, they read ok to me in the context :)
Agreed.

And there's nothing wrong with repeating a word unless it actually jars. If you have to read through a paragraph looking for repeated words, then it kind of follows that it's not jarring.

Unless the repeated word is "crepuscular"!

Anyway, I'll guess at Tanith Lee. (Have we had Angela Carter?)

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-08, 06:51 AM
... Unless the repeated word is "crepuscular"! ...


Or "preternatural". (Oh, how I have come to loathe that word).

Gillianren
2007-Jun-08, 09:09 AM
Anyway, I'll guess at Tanith Lee. (Have we had Angela Carter?)

It's neither. (I'm currently reading a Tannith Lee, though.) This particular woman has retold several fairy tales in the last five years, but she's more famous--much more famous--for a long-running series of books primarily written in a series of trilogies.

Edit: Not the trilogies with dragons, either.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-08, 10:09 AM
Or "preternatural". (Oh, how I have come to loathe that word).
And possibly "lampshade".

As for what happens when you have all three...


He looked out of the window. Somehow the crepuscular sky caused his heart to twinge in a preternatural manner. He closed the curtains and adjusted the lampshade. The light through the lampshade cast a preternatural crepuscular glow on the wall. He remembered buying the lampshade from a lampshade shop. They were doing a special offer: two lampshades for the price of one lampshade. He had bought this lampshade, and got another lampshade for free. Somehow he had never gotten around to fitting the other lampshade, so it was not that much of a bargain...

We could have a whole thread about this.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-08, 10:23 AM
(I'm currently reading a Tannith Lee, though.)
Which one?

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-08, 02:40 PM
And possibly "lampshade".

As for what happens when you have all three...



We could have a whole thread about this.
Oh, by the time I got to the end of that I was literally crying with laughter, cheers Paul, you've brightened up my day - with a lampshade! :lol:

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-08, 08:27 PM
Although I don't think it scans well - too many uses of "crepuscular" and "preternatural".

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-08, 08:28 PM
I'm gonna take a wild stab in the dark about the author:

Katherine Kerr

or Marion Zimmer Bradley?

OK, that was two. Was I cheating?

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-08, 10:35 PM
Marion Zimmer Bradley?
I doubt it would be her - she's been dead for the past five years, hasn't she?

Gillianren
2007-Jun-09, 04:19 AM
Which one?

White as Snow. (Guess which one that's a retelling of!)

No on all the authors guessed so far. And, yes, Marion Zimmer Bradley was dead before this book was published. I'm fairly sure the authors met, but only because the community's pretty insular, so I'm fairly sure they've all met at some point!

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-09, 08:34 PM
Yeah, but other authors have published posthumously, right?

mike alexander
2007-Jun-11, 11:32 PM
Paul Beardsley wrote:

We could have a whole thread about this.


But let's not. Unless there was a formal contest for the worst descriptive passage in fantastic literature.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-11, 11:48 PM
Yeah, but other authors have published posthumously, right?

True. But this one is still living, and she writes a lot of books with talking/telepathically communicating animals.

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-12, 12:45 AM
True. But this one is still living, and she writes a lot of books with talking/telepathically communicating animals.
Ok... totally without the power of the t'net, that suggests Andre Norton to me? But can only come up with Beast Master (a personal fave, but don't own it & haven't read it for years & then too many years).

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-12, 12:50 AM
Paul Beardsley wrote:



But let's not. Unless there was a formal contest for the worst descriptive passage in fantastic literature.

Apparently, 'There was a dark & stormy night' once.... :)

Noclevername
2007-Jun-12, 12:54 AM
Anne McCaffrey? (Dragons are animals, right?)

On second thought, no.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-12, 01:58 AM
I thought of Andre Norton, but she died in 2005. I also thought of Joan D. Vinge, but I don't think she wrote anything quite like this, and she doesn't write a lot of books.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 03:41 AM
Anne McCaffrey? (Dragons are animals, right?)

On second thought, no.

No, I said no dragons. However, the horses/birds/etc. of this woman's books tend to be similar to McCaffrey's dragons in a lot of ways.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-13, 05:38 PM
Another wild stab in the dark:

Elizabeth Ann Scarborough?

HenrikOlsen
2007-Jun-13, 06:07 PM
Paul Beardsley wrote:



But let's not. Unless there was a formal contest for the worst descriptive passage in fantastic literature.

Apparently, 'There was a dark & stormy night' once.... :)
Where you by chance or design thinking of:

It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents--except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness.

That contest already exists, sorta-annually (http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/) since 1983.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-13, 08:11 PM
Another wild stab in the dark:

Elizabeth Ann Scarborough?

Nope.

It's odd; I thought the woman was more popular than this. I own roughly two dozen of her books, and my collection is smaller than that of several of my friends.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-13, 09:19 PM
Train of thought here - is it Storm Constantine?

Gillianren
2007-Jun-13, 11:09 PM
No, though she's another one where both her first and last name are familiar as words, not human names. (Though, of course, the first name is familiar as something else because it was initially a human name.)

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-13, 11:20 PM
No, though she's another one where both her first and last name are familiar as words, not human names. (Though, of course, the first name is familiar as something else because it was initially a human name.)
That's interesting.

I once had occasion to phone her. I am embarrassed to admit that I could not bring myself to address her by her first name.

I have to say, though, that Constantine is generally regarded as a human name. Unless the old Roman empires are still thought of as gods. (Hey, politics AND religion!)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-14, 01:39 AM
Well, you do have me there. However, he did give his name to a city--and the person who shares a first name with this author gave her name to a car.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-14, 04:51 AM
Mercedes Lackey!

Gillianren
2007-Jun-14, 05:19 AM
That's the author. Anyone have a guess on the book? (It's not a classic; it never will be. But I really like it!)

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-14, 08:24 AM
I've not read any. TBH, I found her name a bit unappealing, which is of course unfair, but I am often influenced by author names. This is a recognised thing. Stephen Baxter used to write under the name S.M. Baxter but his agent suggested he change it.

Incidentally, Mercedes isn't the only female name that has become almost completely associated with a car. Cortina is another one.

And my first girlfriend was called Jaguar Jenkins. (No, I made that up.)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-14, 08:43 AM
She's pretty mindless, though I think the series our selection's from is a little more thoughtful than the majority of her stuff.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-14, 06:41 PM
Mercedes Lackey has had almost nothing at all published in the UK...

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-14, 11:57 PM
She does a lot of collaborations, and I've read some of those, but I'm not familiar with the stories mentioned here. Looking at a list of titles, there are at least a couple that might fit, but I'll guess Phoenix And Ashes.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-15, 06:49 AM
She does a lot of collaborations, and I've read some of those, but I'm not familiar with the stories mentioned here. Looking at a list of titles, there are at least a couple that might fit, but I'll guess Phoenix And Ashes.

That's the one!

It's the best of its series; in the newest, she gets back into the whole hyperintelligent familiars thing, which doesn't really fit the rest of the series.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-16, 10:02 AM
...
Incidentally, Mercedes isn't the only female name that has become almost completely associated with a car. Cortina is another one.

...

Well, yes, the name Mercedes is associated with cars, but only because Herr Benz named the car after his daughter, and the marque subsequently became extremely successful.

And I thought Cortina was a place: see Wiki's entry here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortina_d'Ampezzo).

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-16, 10:41 AM
Should I post the next clue then? (I feel like I had half credit, since Noclevername got the author's name.)

Anyway, to get the thread going, here's a bit of text from the start of a novel:

Wind howled over the rolling, sparsely wooded hills of the lands in the care of the Marat, the One-and-Many people. Hard, coarse, flecks of snow fled before it, and though the One rode high in the sky, the overcast hid her face.

Kitai began to feel the cold for the first time since spring.

What's the author and book title? That text has some big hints if you are at all familiar with the book.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-16, 12:30 PM
Oops, double post.

Perhaps people should say something more when they edit double posts. Not necessarily relevant, but interesting in some way. To give added value. After all, the post is there - it might as well earn its keep.

Not that I've got anything interesting to say at the moment. Except my wife and I just got a PDA with a GPS in it, so a square dot appears on a map to show where we are. Which is lovely. I wonder if there are any fantasy stories that feature magic maps that do this.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-16, 12:31 PM
Wind howled over the rolling, sparsely wooded hills of the lands in the care of the Marat, the One-and-Many people. Hard, course, flecks of snow fled before it, and though the One rode high in the sky, the overcast hid her face.

Kitai began to feel the cold for the first time since spring.

Not one to be pedantic, but...

Should that be "coarse"?

Not that I recognise the quote, alas. Sounds good, though.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-16, 08:00 PM
Not one to be pedantic, but...

Should that be "coarse"?

Not that I recognise the quote, alas. Sounds good, though.

I spotted that, too. I was hoping it might be a hint about the publishing house. Which ones are most notorious for poor editing...? :)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-16, 08:23 PM
I know I constantly want to send Mercedes Lackey novels back dripping in red ink these days.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-16, 08:34 PM
Except my wife and I just got a PDA with a GPS in it, so a square dot appears on a map to show where we are. Which is lovely. I wonder if there are any fantasy stories that feature magic maps that do this.


I vaguely recall a Piers Anthony "Xanth" novel from my teens, "Centaur Isle", IIRC, had a character whose magical "talent" was map projection. Mapped every place she(?) went.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-16, 09:06 PM
Not one to be pedantic, but...

Should that be "coarse"?

Not that I recognise the quote, alas. Sounds good, though.

Yes, it should, it was my mistake, and I corrected it. That's what I get for posting when half asleep.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-16, 09:13 PM
Hints:

This is part of a series. The author is better known for another ongoing fantasy series.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-16, 10:03 PM
I know I constantly want to send Mercedes Lackey novels back dripping in red ink these days.

If you ever feel you've committed an unforgivable sin, seek out a copy of Minds of the Empire by Warren James Palmer. It's self-published by an author who hasn't a clue about when to use punctuation.

(And that's the least of the book's flaws...)

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-17, 09:07 AM
I know I constantly want to send Mercedes Lackey novels back dripping in red ink these days.

I feel the same about Sarah Zettel novels. "The lighthouse shined out in the night..." Aaargh!



It should be "shone".

SeanF
2007-Jun-18, 07:38 PM
Oops, double post.

Perhaps people should say something more when they edit double posts. Not necessarily relevant, but interesting in some way. To give added value. After all, the post is there - it might as well earn its keep.

Not that I've got anything interesting to say at the moment. Except my wife and I just got a PDA with a GPS in it, so a square dot appears on a map to show where we are. Which is lovely. I wonder if there are any fantasy stories that feature magic maps that do this.
Wait a second. Did you double-post and then edit the first of the two posts?

Shouldn't it show a "last edited" line, in that case?:think:

At any rate, if you catch the double-post before anybody else adds to the thread, you should be able to delete the second post...

(Oh, and didn't one of the Harry Potter books have a magical map of Hogwarts that showed you where you were (not to mention where others were)? Marauder's Map, or somesuch?)

(Oh, again, is "square dot" an oxymoron?)

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-18, 08:16 PM
(Oh, again, is "square dot" an oxymoron?)
I used to do contract work via an agency called Square O*e & some of them were morons :D

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-18, 10:25 PM
(Oh, and didn't one of the Harry Potter books have a magical map of Hogwarts that showed you where you were (not to mention where others were)? Marauder's Map, or somesuch?)

Yes, it did. I thought much the same when I saw that comment.


(Oh, again, is "square dot" an oxymoron?)

I'm not sure. I don't think a dot has to be any specific shape, therefore there's no reason it can't be square.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-18, 10:31 PM
Wait a second. Did you double-post and then edit the first of the two posts?
Yes, I did.

Shouldn't it show a "last edited" line, in that case?:think:
I thought so but it apparently is not the case.

At any rate, if you catch the double-post before anybody else adds to the thread, you should be able to delete the second post...
I'd added stuff by the time I double-posted. Also, I think it was one of those occasions when I lost connection at the exact moment of the post.

(Oh, and didn't one of the Harry Potter books have a magical map of Hogwarts that showed you where you were (not to mention where others were)? Marauder's Map, or somesuch?)
I remembered that later - and slapped my own forehead!

(Oh, again, is "square dot" an oxymoron?)
No.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-19, 01:40 AM
Time for a big hint:

There is a television show based on the author's other series.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-19, 09:48 PM
I know some folks here are familiar with this author, so trying to get things moving:

The TV show is on the Sci-fi channel.

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-20, 12:07 AM
The TV show is on the Sci-fi channel.
Now; would that be the US version Sci-Fi channel, the UK one, or somewhere else? :D

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-20, 12:22 AM
Now; would that be the US version Sci-Fi channel, the UK one, or somewhere else? :D

U.S., but the show has been discussed on BAUT.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-20, 02:09 AM
As being a really bad version of the source material, right?

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-20, 07:03 AM
As being a really bad version of the source material, right?

Depends on who you ask. I don't think they did as badly with it as some, but the books are far more interesting than the series.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-20, 08:32 AM
Well, I did an Amazon search, so I've got the author and probably the series. However, I've not actually read anyone, so if someone who has wants to take a stab at it, go for it.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-20, 11:48 AM
Some of the discussion is making me think of Ursula LeGuin's Earthsea series. I don't think that's it, though.

But I thought it would be friendly to at least hazard a guess!

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-20, 08:47 PM
No, the author is male and this is much more recent. I'm glad to see a guess, though.

mike alexander
2007-Jun-20, 08:53 PM
Is it that Harry Reasoner, Psychic Detective guy? The Something Files? Harry Dresden. The Dresden Files?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-20, 08:55 PM
Would it be Jim Butcher?

(Wild guess.)

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-20, 09:19 PM
Yes to Jim Butcher, but Dresdin Files is his other series. (See this hint (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=1011156&postcount=154)).

I think Noclevername gets it (both for this and the last one) unless anyone objects. Later, I'll make a few comments about the story (I do like it, and it is different from Dresden Files).

Noclevername
2007-Jun-20, 10:55 PM
I know his other series is called Codex Alera, but I know zip about it. Close enough?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-20, 11:02 PM
Hmm. Give me a day to come up with something good.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-20, 11:38 PM
I know his other series is called Codex Alera, but I know zip about it. Close enough?

That's it. This was from the second book in the series, Academ's Fury. Unlike the Dresden Files (a fantasy mystery series in a world like ours but with a hidden side), this is a full fantasy world setting. In this world, humans have elemental powers ("furycrafting") which they need because of their often very hostile neighbors. There are other species, that in the case of the Marat are near human, but others can be far from human.

The main character (Tavi) is unusual in that he appears to have no furycrafting ability at all, and is looked at as inferior by many for that reason. But, he has a habit of trumping powerful furycrafters and other enemies with his wits. I like stories where people succeed by thinking through problems, not just blundering around with superior force.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-22, 02:49 AM
Here goes:

"The all-consuming fire left of Balamung only grey flakes of ash. The wind tossed them high in the air and blew them away. He had read his stars aright: no man would ever know his grave, for there was nothing of him left to bury."

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-22, 02:55 AM
Here goes:

Wisdom of the Fox

Noclevername
2007-Jun-22, 03:00 AM
Wisdom of the Fox

Well, that was short.

Yes, it was WOTF, from Harry Turtledove. I would have also accepted Werenight, the title from when it was published separately.

Take it away, Tim.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-22, 03:03 AM
Does it have to be strictly written fantasy?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-22, 03:19 AM
Does it have to be strictly written fantasy?


Well, it says literary.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-22, 03:28 AM
Well, it says literary.

Why don't you go again - that last one was too fast.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-22, 03:09 PM
Wake up, wake up Noclevername!

You should go again.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-22, 04:33 PM
"I am not inclined to favor this expedition", my father said. His words caught me unprepared. Rali had laid the groundwork well, and I had been certain he would approve.
You must, Father", I pleaded. "I doubt there will ever be such an opportunity in my lifetime. Please, you must give me your blessing."
"There is nothing I must do, _______," my father replied. "Except pay my tithes to the Council of Evocators, my taxes to the Magistrates, and a gold coin to the Seeker, to make my passage to the other world painless and swift. "

Got to go, back later.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-27, 03:09 AM
Kingdoms of the Night?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-27, 05:33 AM
Kingdoms of the Night?


Eh, close enough. It was the first one in the series, The Far Kingdoms.

Okay, now go.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-27, 02:35 PM
Does it have to be GOOD fantasy literature? If not, can it be pulp or graphic novel?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-27, 02:57 PM
Does it have to be GOOD fantasy literature? If not, can it be pulp or graphic novel?


Sure, go crazy.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-03, 05:01 AM
Still there Tim

While we wait here is an easy one to keep things moving


"If you take him down I can garrote the other one with my apron string," whispered ________ in her ear, between howls.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-03, 02:19 PM
Still there Tim

While we wait here is an easy one to keep things moving

Sorry. Forgot about this. Thanks for jump-starting this thread.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-04, 06:26 AM
No probs Tim, why don't you add another quote and give people two to guess

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-04, 02:04 PM
No probs Tim, why don't you add another quote and give people two to guess

With the lack of activity on this thread one quote is probably enough. I haven't read a lot of fantasy books so I'm at a disadvantage here anyhow. :)

Onward Aragorn!

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jul-04, 02:20 PM
With the lack of activity on this thread one quote is probably enough.
No, the idea is that if people get either one, it is their turn. They are then told the one they did not get.

That is likely to speed things up.

I think the problem is, there is just so much fantasy, and an awful lot of it is very similar to another awful lot of it.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-04, 02:21 PM
No, the idea is that if people get either one, it is their turn. They are then told the one they did not get.

That is likely to speed things up.

I think the problem is, there is just so much fantasy, and an awful lot of it is very similar to another awful lot of it.

Paul, go ahead and take my place then.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jul-04, 09:12 PM
Paul, go ahead and take my place then.
Thanks, but I'm too busy at the moment. I'll probably be more active in a couple of weeks.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-04, 09:15 PM
"If you take him down I can garrote the other one with my apron string," whispered ________ in her ear, between howls.
Well, here's yet another line I don't recognise.

Here are two more wild stabs in the dark (authors only):
Jaqueline Carey
Terry Goodkind

Anywhere close ... ?

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jul-04, 09:20 PM
Bumping this for Strider1974.




Here is an easy one to keep things moving

Quote:


"If you take him down I can garrote the other one with my apron string," whispered ________ in her ear, between howls.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-05, 12:52 PM
Well, here's yet another line I don't recognise.

Here are two more wild stabs in the dark (authors only):
Jaqueline Carey
Terry Goodkind

Anywhere close ... ?

No neither of those.
To keep things moving I will give the missing name in the quote



If you take him down I can garrote the other one with my apron string," whispered Tonker in her ear, between howls.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-05, 08:48 PM
D'oh! Still not one I recognise...

darkhunter
2007-Jul-06, 02:46 AM
Monstrous Regiment

Gillianren
2007-Jul-06, 07:38 AM
Dagnabbit! I just mentioned it in another thread, too! Yes, you're right.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-06, 11:12 AM
Gillianren is correct, you got it Darkhunter.

darkhunter
2007-Jul-06, 11:27 AM
"Pround mortal!" hissed a sibilant voice through the veils of agony. "I never sought you. You have hunted me through these long, lonely years. Stay on this mountain and I guarentee you two score more years. Your muscles will atrophy, your brain will sink into dotage. Your will bloat, old man, and I will only come when you beg it.'

'Or will the huntsman have one more hunt?"

Strider1974
2007-Jul-06, 02:42 PM
Is it David Gemmel's 'Legend'

darkhunter
2007-Jul-06, 11:32 PM
Got it in one :)

Strider1974
2007-Jul-10, 01:39 AM
Sorry for the delay folks. Here is another easy one to keep things moving.


Riddles were all he could think of. Asking them them, and sometimes guessing them, had been the only game he had ever played with the other funny creatures sitting in their holes in the long, long ago, before he had lost all his friends and was driven away, alone, and crept down, down, into the dark under the mountains.

Roy Batty
2007-Jul-10, 02:08 AM
Sorry for the delay folks. Here is another easy one to keep things moving.

Easy does he think it isssss? Gol'lum.

You shouldn't do such easy questions you know. They can get quite Hobbit forming :)

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-10, 07:45 AM
... They can get quite Hobbit forming :)

:groan:

I'm sorry, Roy, but for that one, I'm going to have to shoot you...

Does Strider1974 get another go for giving us an easy one (one so easy that I could have guessed it had I seen it before Roy), or is it Roy's turn now?

Roy Batty
2007-Jul-10, 03:54 PM
I think you or Strider should do the next one, I know I don't deserve it after that. Sorry, I'm just a Hobbitual punner I guess... (BANG!) :D

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-10, 09:18 PM
Well, to keep things moving, and with apologies to anyone upon whose toes I am stepping...


[character x] shouted back at him: "Do you fear one being, [character y], just one?"
[character y]'s golden sword flickered in his hand. His back seemed bowed, his voice was low. "I fear [character z]," he said.
"You are wise to do so," said [character z]. He waved one of his hands. "Now, let us dismiss all these silly trappings and concern ourselves with the fight."

Strider1974
2007-Jul-10, 09:33 PM
Does Strider1974 get another go for giving us an easy one (one so easy that I could have guessed it had I seen it before Roy), or is it Roy's turn now?


I wanted it to be really easy to keep things moving, so I am happy to let Dr Nigel's quote stand.

SMEaton
2007-Jul-11, 08:30 AM
[character x] shouted back at him: "Do you fear one being, [character y], just one?"
[character y]'s golden sword flickered in his hand. His back seemed bowed, his voice was low. "I fear [character z]," he said.
"You are wise to do so," said [character z]. He waved one of his hands. "Now, let us dismiss all these silly trappings and concern ourselves with the fight." "One of his hands"... does character z have more that two?

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-11, 07:56 PM
"One of his hands"... does character z have more that two?

No, I think just the two.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-13, 04:20 PM
Might be time for hint Dr Nigel

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-13, 04:51 PM
British author, very prolific, but most of his work published in the 60s and 70s.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-18, 07:29 PM
Looks like time for another hint...

Character x is named Jhary
Character y is named Mabelode
Character z is named Kwll

Strider1974
2007-Jul-18, 09:28 PM
The names sound a lot like Michael Moorcock's Corum.
Is it "The King of the Swords"

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-19, 09:06 AM
Spot on. Your turn.

Strider1974
2007-Jul-19, 10:32 AM
Spot on. Your turn.

Here is another easy one to keep things moving


Size and attire alone would have made the giant otter worthy of notice, even if he hadn't tripped over Meriweather's feet.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-19, 05:38 PM
Alan Dean Foster's Spellsinger?

Strider1974
2007-Jul-19, 10:45 PM
Alan Dean Foster's Spellsinger?


That's the one. Your turn again.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jul-23, 02:02 PM
Woohoo!

OK, I'll try to make this slightly easier than last time...



On the road, the Old Road,
A tower made of stone;
In the tower hangs a bell
Which cannot ring alone...

Dr Nigel
2007-Aug-01, 05:41 PM
Hmmm, doesn't seem to be as easy as I thought it might be.

Here's a hint:
Prolific American female author, born in Colorado, and lived there at the time this book was published (my copy was published in the UK in 1988). Her fantasy novels are never your standard "Dungeons & Dragons" style, but usually a bit off-the-wall.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Aug-01, 09:08 PM
Sheri S. Tepper, from the "True Game" series, I'd guess one of the Jinian books.

Dr Nigel
2007-Aug-04, 09:30 PM
Yes, that's the one. I think the rhyme actually crops up in all three Jinian books. Your turn, Henrik.

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-12, 11:05 PM
This thread deserves a bump, I can post soon if no one else does :)

HenrikOlsen
2007-Aug-13, 06:38 AM
I should know better than answering when my access is so sporadic.
I'll yield to Roy as I'm not likely to be on enough.

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-15, 12:56 AM
Okely dokely


What are you doing?
Feeding the pigeons.

:)

Dr Nigel
2007-Aug-15, 07:50 PM
Hmmm ... that rings a bell but I can't place it. Perhaps Pratchett again?

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-15, 08:55 PM
Is it from a Neil Gaiman novel?

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-16, 10:32 PM
Hmmm ... that rings a bell but I can't place it. Perhaps Pratchett again?
No.


Is it from a Neil Gaiman novel?
You tell me :)

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-17, 12:03 AM
Is your quote from Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere, by any chance?

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-17, 03:50 PM
Not Neverwhere. Interesting you identified it as being a Gaiman quote but didn't get it straight away!
Better be quick... other Gaiman fans who visit here I'm sure :)

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-17, 04:01 PM
Doh! I could've sworn that was an exchange in Neverwhere with the bird man... Driven by my need to know, I googled. I see now it's from one of the his works that I haven't read yet. I'll refrain from answering, unless no one else answers.

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-17, 06:55 PM
Ah, I see what you mean about Neverwhere :) I have the book & dvd's, loved it when it 1st aired!

I'd just give it a day & go for it!

Edit: Oh heck, just go for it now anyway - but I want the story title as well mind you, since you googled it :)

Dr Nigel
2007-Aug-18, 08:58 PM
I can see why it might suggest Neverwhere. I've not read much Gaiman otherwise. Maybe I'll google it if CodeSlinger doesn't post his/her answer soon.

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-19, 02:15 AM
Is the story "The Sound of Her Wings" (Sandman issue #8), by Neil Gaiman?

Roy Batty
2007-Aug-19, 11:26 AM
Yep that's it, it's Death talking to Morpheus, then she goes on to say:

'You do that too much, you know what you get?'
'FAT PIGEONS!' :)

I was going to include that as well to see if anyone suggested Mary Poppins but thought it would make it too easy to google.

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-20, 02:32 AM
Nice :) I definitely have to read that series at some point, given I've read everything else Gaiman has published. For my quote, since I cheated, I'll something that will hopefully prove easy:


He stood for a moment longer in the orange glow, as if gathering his strength, and then he began to dance something that was caught between a jig and a tap routine. It was slow at first, very slow, heel and toe, heel and toe. Again and again his bootheels made that fist-on-coffintop sound, but now it had rhythm. Just rhythm at first, and then, as [the character]'s feet began to pick up speed, it was more than rhythm: it became a kind of jive. That was the only word Eddie could think of, the only one that seemed to fit.

jamesabrown
2007-Aug-20, 03:40 PM
Nice :) I definitely have to read that series at some point, given I've read everything else Gaiman has published. For my quote, since I cheated, I'll something that will hopefully prove easy:

Ah, that would be Wolves of the Calla by Stephen King.

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-20, 03:49 PM
Was that too easy?

Take it away, jamesabrown!

jamesabrown
2007-Aug-20, 06:22 PM
Was that too easy?


Roland's dance stuck in my memory, and the mention of "Eddie" clinched it.


Probably easy, but it's one of my favorites:


The great company surged forward onto a flat place <protag> recognized as the Fire Garden. There the cloaked figures set their torches down into niches between the tiles, or placed them atop stone pedestals, so that a garden of fire indeed bloomed there, a field of flickering, rippling light. Fanned by the wind, the flames danced; sparks seemed to outnumber the very stars.

jamesabrown
2007-Aug-28, 01:26 PM
Hint time, I suppose.

This is a line near the beginning of the third novel in a popular trilogy published in the nineties.

CodeSlinger
2007-Aug-30, 09:59 PM
Another hint please?

jamesabrown
2007-Aug-31, 01:13 PM
I was beginning to wonder if this thread was dead.

Okay, the book in question was published in 1993.

jamesabrown
2007-Sep-04, 01:36 PM
Okay, another hint.

The protag's name in my quote is Simon.

jamesabrown
2007-Sep-06, 01:53 PM
Okay, one more hint, then I'll give the reveal, then, what? Declare this thread a corpse?

The author of this quote wrote a science fiction quadrology called Otherland.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Sep-07, 01:19 PM
Your hints seem to boil down to Tad Williams (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tad_Williams), To Green Angel Tower (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Green_Angel_Tower).

jamesabrown
2007-Sep-07, 05:46 PM
Correct, Henrik. You're up, if you want.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Sep-11, 03:36 PM
Here it is:

She came to touch her hand on his face, ‘Son,’ she said, ‘We love you. Remember that. We all love you. No matter how different you are, no matter if you leave us one day.’ She kissed his cheek. ‘And if and when you die, your bones will lie undisturbed, we’ll see to that. You’ll lie at ease forever, and I'll come visit every Allhallows Eve and tuck you in the more secure.’

HenrikOlsen
2007-Sep-13, 12:25 PM
Hint time I think, it was first published all the way back in 1946 and the author's probably better known for Science Fiction.

Roy Batty
2007-Sep-14, 04:09 PM
Not sure why but the quote is suggesting Ray Bradbury to me - no idea what though.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Sep-18, 01:55 PM
It is Bradbury:)

HenrikOlsen
2007-Sep-22, 11:59 AM
Ok, more info:
It's a short story.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Oct-05, 04:47 PM
Seems like this is about to die completely, so I'll hand it over to Roy Batty for getting Bradbury right.

Incidentally, the story's called Homecoming.

Strider1974
2007-Nov-08, 07:43 AM
****bump****

HenrikOlsen
2007-Nov-09, 02:11 AM
Roy seems lost, so over to Strider instead

HenrikOlsen
2007-Dec-02, 05:44 PM
Right, I'll try again, with a new quote:


Ben had no idea what this meant and found himself, for the hundredth time, wishing that A Walking Tour of the British Coastline had an American-English phrase book in the back. 'Is that food?' he asked.

Gillianren
2007-Dec-02, 06:40 PM
I've read that one, I know it. Is it Gaiman? (Yeah, I know. Default guess. But it's a good place for me to start searching the shelves.)