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nebularain
2003-Jun-06, 06:03 PM
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/gallery/video/animation.html

This is very cool!
You get to see the animation of the launch, the rocket dispelling its parts until just the capsule remains and fires for a bit, the entry, the "mooon-bounce"-like landing, and the rover coming out and exporing.


This site gives stills of the launch from the video:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/mission/launch_e_sequenceDef.html

And while I'm at it, this sit give launch stats and links to viewing on person, on NASA TV or over the internet.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/mission/launch_e.html

aporetic_r
2003-Jun-06, 08:01 PM
Hey, great animation. Thanks for posting it. I have a two questions, if I may...

1) Not really a question, actually... There was sound in space.
2) After launch, some rockets fire top start the craft spinning, and shortly after some tethered weights (I assume) elongate out to the sides to (again, I assume) stop the craft from spinning. Why is this done?

Aporetic
www.polisci.wisc.edu/~rdparrish

g99
2003-Jun-06, 08:51 PM
Amazing video!
But sounds in space NASA? you should know better. [wags finger at the sound editor]

crazy4space
2003-Jun-06, 09:28 PM
[quote="nebularain"]http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/gallery/video/animation.html

This is very cool!
You get to see the animation of the launch, the rocket dispelling its parts until just the capsule remains and fires for a bit, the entry, the "mooon-bounce"-like landing, and the rover coming out and exporing.


You are right this is very cool. In Kansas City at Sceince City they have a rover that you can actually play with.

nebularain
2003-Jun-06, 11:41 PM
Hey, great animation. Thanks for posting it. I have a two questions, if I may...

1) Not really a question, actually... There was sound in space.
2) After launch, some rockets fire top start the craft spinning, and shortly after some tethered weights (I assume) elongate out to the sides to (again, I assume) stop the craft from spinning. Why is this done?


1) My guess is that it's easier to give the public that doesn't know better what they expect than what is correct, in this case. Imagine Johnny Q public watching this video - and suddenly the sound cuts off! For us, who know better, it would be cool (err - where exactly would the sound-cut-off point be, anyway?). But for everyone else, there would need to be a disclaimer note as to why there was all of a sudden no sound (Uh, no, this is not a glitch in the program!). Like I said, this is my guess anyway.

2) I'm glad you asked! I will be even more glad when someone actually answers this, 'cause I was wonderin' the same thing meself (!).

BigJim
2003-Jun-06, 11:59 PM
2) After launch, some rockets fire top start the craft spinning, and shortly after some tethered weights (I assume) elongate out to the sides to (again, I assume) stop the craft from spinning. Why is this done?

From the mission timeline:


LAUNCH

Each Mars Exploration Rover will be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral, Florida.
The Delta II stands about 100 feet tall and the rover is housed in a payload fairing that sits on top of the rocket. The first MER spacecraft launches in the daytime and the second one at night.
The Delta II engines produce more than 140,000 pounds of thrust to break the grip of Earth’s gravity.
Nine solid rocket boosters ring the Delta launch vehicle. Six are ignited at launch and then discarded after they use up their fuel. The remaining three boosters are ignited in mid-air.
After the first stage of the rocket stops firing, it is discarded. Then the second stage engine ignites.
The payload fairing separates and reveals the MER spacecraft.
Small rockets are fired to spin up the third stage. The spinning motion helps to stabilize the spacecraft, acting like a gyroscope.
A burn of the third stage pushes the spacecraft out of Earth orbit and on a trajectory to Mars
The spacecraft must be de-spun so that it can achieve its proper cruise orientation. A set of weights called “yo-yos” are released from the spinning vehicle on flexible lines. They slow the spin of the spacecraft in much the same way that an ice skater decreases the velocity of a spin by extending his or her arms
The MER spacecraft separates from the Delta's third stage and begins its seven-month journey to Mars.

ToSeek
2003-Jun-07, 01:19 AM
2) After launch, some rockets fire top start the craft spinning, and shortly after some tethered weights (I assume) elongate out to the sides to (again, I assume) stop the craft from spinning. Why is this done?

Explanation of third stage (scroll down a little) (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mer/mission/launch_stage3.html)

Basically, the spin provides stability while thrusting - it's cheaper than putting the equipment in place to both monitor the spacecraft's attitude and correct it.