PDA

View Full Version : The sky is falling



eric_marsh
2007-Apr-23, 01:08 AM
Found this on another message board. Thought it might be good for a chuckle.

SUPERNOVA FROM EXPERIMENTATION AT FERMILAB

The current energy levels at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have been increased from 1.2 TeV to 33 TeV (trillion electron volts) for the the Tevatron 2 trials scheduled for this March or April 2001.
Please check the Luminoisty Webpage at Fermilab to verify this enormous increase.

Clearly, this is enough energy to access those energies resident in de Sitter space thus producing a supernova. This is termed a Type Ia supernova and is used as a standard candle for distance estimates in observational astronomy.

Even though research is often risky this is an unacceptable risk since supernova production will destroy everything out to a perimeter of some 50 light years.

Please contact me at <dixon@hawaii.edu> for further information. Go to: ( Paul Dixon Supernova) on Google.com or (Paul W. Dixon supernova) as well to check various webpages on this topic.

Yours sincerely,

Paul W. Dixon, Ph.D.
Supernova from Experimentation

The Backroad Astronomer
2007-Apr-23, 01:34 AM
there was a long thread about Fermilab creating a blackhole, now first we need to create a star to create a supernova.

Van Rijn
2007-Apr-23, 01:45 AM
Paul W. Dixon, Ph.D.
Supernova from Experimentation

From a little googling, it seems he's been spreading (more like spamming) this "form letter" around for years. Also, here's a page on him:

http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/~dixon/PaulDixonCV.html

He was born in '36, has a Ph.D. in psychology, but claims to have been "Nominated for Nobel Prize in Physics, 1986, 1995, 1998." Nominated by who, I wonder?

Pinemarten
2007-Apr-23, 02:07 AM
there was a long thread about Fermilab creating a blackhole, now first we need to create a star to create a supernova.

You mean we can put a man on the moon, probes on many planets, moons, and even a comet; but we can't create a star yet?

I thought that is what we were paying all those people for.

Is it a political/funding type problem?

speedfreek
2007-Apr-23, 08:43 PM
I think it would be a great idea to try to create a type 1a supernova at Fermilab. We would really be helping extra terrestrial astronomers by providing them with a new standard candle in this region of space. If we can't work out how this universe works ourselves, maybe we can help somebody else do it!

It's just a pity that we don't have the energy to do it, although we might be able to manage an angstronova which would create radiation lethal to any living thing within a 50 angstrom radius. ;)

LurchGS
2007-Apr-24, 04:01 AM
No - I didn't look..

PhD in Psychology - nominated in Physics (not impossible)..

where did he get his Doctorate? Warner Brothers?

Maksutov
2007-Apr-24, 08:45 AM
Found this on another message board. Thought it might be good for a chuckle.

SUPERNOVA FROM EXPERIMENTATION AT FERMILAB

The current energy levels at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory have been increased from 1.2 TeV to 33 TeV (trillion electron volts) for the the Tevatron 2 trials scheduled for this March or April 2001.
Please check the Luminoisty Webpage at Fermilab to verify this enormous increase.

Clearly, this is enough energy to access those energies resident in de Sitter space thus producing a supernova. This is termed a Type Ia supernova and is used as a standard candle for distance estimates in observational astronomy.

Even though research is often risky this is an unacceptable risk since supernova production will destroy everything out to a perimeter of some 50 light years.

Please contact me at <dixon@hawaii.edu> for further information. Go to: ( Paul Dixon Supernova) on Google.com or (Paul W. Dixon supernova) as well to check various webpages on this topic.

Yours sincerely,

Paul W. Dixon, Ph.D.
Supernova from Experimentation"Trillion" is always a good number to impress non-technical people with. But...

1 electron volt = 1.60217646 &#215; 10-19 joules

1 trillion electron volts = 1.60217646 &#215; 10-7 joules

1 joule is approximately the amount of energy required to lift a one kilogram object up by a height of about 10 centimetres on the surface of the Earth.

Therefore the energy involved here is about 1.6 ten-millionths of one joule.

And from that we're going to produce a supernova, eh?

Nominated for the Ignoble Prize in Physics, I'd say.


BTW, such a "big" and "impressive" number was involved in one of the main technical blunders in the movie Forbidden Planet. It's stated that the ID monster had been hit with 3 billion electron volts. That's barely enough to illuminate a flashbulb light for a moment or two, if that.

HenrikOlsen
2007-Apr-26, 01:52 AM
Therefore the energy involved here is about 1.6 ten-millionths of one joule.
Or about 1/10,000th the energy used by one flea in one jump. :)

LurchGS
2007-Apr-26, 03:09 AM
hadn't we better evacuate the city, then? :)

Van Rijn
2007-Apr-26, 03:33 AM
hadn't we better evacuate the city, then? :)

Well, based on the logic above, if you see a flea, it would be time to flee.

LurchGS
2007-Apr-26, 03:48 AM
Well, based on the logic above, if you see a flea, it would be time to flee.

Through a flaw in the flue?

cbacba
2007-Apr-26, 07:09 PM
From a little googling, it seems he's been spreading (more like spamming) this "form letter" around for years. Also, here's a page on him:

http://www.uhh.hawaii.edu/~dixon/PaulDixonCV.html

He was born in '36, has a Ph.D. in psychology, but claims to have been "Nominated for Nobel Prize in Physics, 1986, 1995, 1998." Nominated by who, I wonder?

Nominated perhaps by himself, friends, family or perhaps by fellow kooks. Maybe he was nominated by paul erhlich.