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skywatcher
2003-Jun-08, 02:10 AM
Space Weather News for Saturday, June 7th
http://spaceweather.com

BIG SUNSPOT: Sunspot 375 has grown impressively during the past 24
hours.
It now stretches nearly 10 Earth-diameters from side to side and has
developed a twisted "beta-gamma-delta" magnetic field, which poses a
threat for X-class solar flares. Any explosions from its vicinity
during
the next few days would likely be Earth-directed. This large spot is
easy
to see, but never stare at the sun! Use safe solar projection
techniques
described at spaceweather.com.

DAYLIGHT METEORS: The annual Arietid meteor shower, which peaks this
year
on June 8th, is a strange one: it happens during the day rather than at
night. This makes the shower remarkably hard to see. Nevertheless, sky
watchers sometimes spot bright Arietids slowly skimming Earth´s
atmosphere
just before dawn--a rare but beautiful sight. Be alert for a sprinkling
of
such meteors on Sunday and possibly Monday morning.

dgruss23
2003-Jun-08, 02:11 AM
No. Remain calm.

Jigsaw
2003-Jun-08, 02:21 AM
Solar flares are only dangerous if you're a satellite.
Meteor showers are only dangerous if you're "Crewman #6".

Are you a satellite, or Crewman #6?

No?

Then relax.

Tito_Muerte
2003-Jun-08, 02:21 AM
*panicking*!!!!

Hale_Bopp
2003-Jun-08, 03:04 AM
Actually, a meteor shower that peaks during the day is NOT unusual. Think of the Leonids last November. There was a peak at 4:30 AM CST. Well, for other parts of the world, such as Europe/Asia, that occurred in the middle of the day! (Well, okay, morning for Europe).

The unusual part (athough not unheard of) is meteors that are bright enought to see during the day.

Rob

Kaptain K
2003-Jun-08, 05:44 AM
Is this bad?
NO!

Once again, you expect us to do your research for you. :evil:

beskeptical
2003-Jun-08, 08:02 AM
It's good, very very good. If we get a nice big Earth directed X-flare there will be more chances to see aurorae here in WA. :D

beskeptical
2003-Jun-08, 08:12 AM
Actually, a meteor shower that peaks during the day is NOT unusual. Think of the Leonids last November. There was a peak at 4:30 AM CST. Well, for other parts of the world, such as Europe/Asia, that occurred in the middle of the day! (Well, okay, morning for Europe).

The unusual part (athough not unheard of) is meteors that are bright enought to see during the day.

Rob

I think what spaceweather.com is referring to might be a dust stream that enters Earth's atmosphere from a different direction. I'm going to have to think this through. Otherwise, why didn't the note refer to it being daytime in a particular part of the globe? The website is global, they aren't just writing to Americans.

kilopi
2003-Jun-08, 12:22 PM
Solar flares are only dangerous if you're a satellite.
Or, a power grid in Canada (http://www.cnn.com/2001/TECH/space/04/04/solar.storm/). :)

BigJim
2003-Jun-08, 02:58 PM
Unless you're a satellite or a power grid, look forward to huge solar flares. That means those of us who live farther south can see the aurorae.(or north, if you live in the southern hemisphere) .