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martynjones1
2003-Jun-09, 12:11 PM
Hi all,

When ever i use a short focal length eyepiece I can see transparent 'worms', for want of a better term, until my eye is the correct distance from the lens.

It's not the lens, so I guess it must be mucus 'trails' on my eye coming into focus on the lens and being reflected back into my eye.

Is this the case? Does everyone suffer from it? Am i mad?!? :o

cheers

Glom
2003-Jun-09, 12:14 PM
I think I know what you're talking about. Sometimes I have problems with fibres on eyepiece. It could be that, but I don't discount your suggestion.

dgruss23
2003-Jun-09, 01:24 PM
I know what you're talking about. If you ever close your eyes on a sunny day, you can follow these structures floating around. They tend to move with your eyes. I don't know what they are (not a biologist) but they look like cells - almost like your eye is a microscope examining the contents of the fluid in your eyes.

planethollywood
2003-Jun-09, 01:28 PM
yep , i get it to. My Optometrist said its gaps in the jelly fluid in your eye. Its a good idea to have your eyes checked at least once a year.

I was told if the gaps get too bad it can cause a detached retina. Buts thats a worse case scenario...

martynjones1
2003-Jun-09, 01:59 PM
Searched for Jelly and came across this site. Apparently they are 'floaters' (not that type!) , they are......

tiny clumps of gel or other semi-transparent matter that drift freely inside the vitreous, the jelly-like fluid that fills the inside of your eyes. In most cases, they are more bothersome than harmful appearing as specks of varying shapes and sizes, or as strands, crystals, cobwebs or as fuzzy clouds that float about and may dart away when you attempt to look at them directly.

This site tells you more....

http://www.visionweb.com/content/consumers/dev_consumerarticles.jsp?RID=32

Pain in the backside having them, hopefully not serious though

cheers all :P

martynjones1
2003-Jun-09, 02:12 PM
Reading on and the floaters accumulate at the bottom of the eyeball.

When I look inot my eyepiece which is attached to a diagonal mirrior the bootom of my eye is the lens so all I can see is floaters. Will experiment tonight to look straight through the scope instead od down into it.

Any other ideas welcome.

Jonesy

gethen
2003-Jun-09, 02:33 PM
Interesting because I noticed these "floaters" for the first time this weekend while using a small spotting scope to watch some loons on the lake. I assumed that they were a result of viewing during the daytime, as I've never noticed them when looking through my big scope at night. Does the amount of light entering the eye have any effect on their visibility?

nebularain
2003-Jun-09, 05:01 PM
I've noticed this problem looking into microscopes, too. But it doesn't happen all the time. I think dryness might have something to do with it (eyes more dry, mucous is thicker or "floating stuff" not getting washed out).

Try putting in some eyedrops before looking into your scope and see if it improves the problem any.

Donnie B.
2003-Jun-09, 05:51 PM
People (like me) who are highly nearsighted know all about floaters. I have a lot of them and can see them any time I care to become aware of them (and, unfortunately, sometimes when I don't want to).

Yes, I would suggest that you reorient your scope so you're not looking straight down into the eyepiece. When my eyes aren't moving, the floaters have a general tendency to move downward in my field of view, but even small eye motions will "stir them up" like shaking a snow globe.

Donnie B.
2003-Jun-09, 05:53 PM
I've noticed this problem looking into microscopes, too. But it doesn't happen all the time. I think dryness might have something to do with it (eyes more dry, mucous is thicker or "floating stuff" not getting washed out).

Try putting in some eyedrops before looking into your scope and see if it improves the problem any.
Eyedrops don't help, neb; floaters are inside the eye.

One tip: if you have a floater directly in line with the fovea (area of sharpest resolution), flick your eyes sharply to one side or the other, then bring them back to the center more slowly. This may move the bad boy out of the critical area.

kilopi
2003-Jun-09, 06:14 PM
Interesting, martynjones1, your link doesn't mention the name by which I've always known these--the ancient Romans called them muscae volitantes (http://www4.vc-net.ne.jp/~klivo/gen/floaters.htm), or flying flies.

martynjones1
2003-Jun-10, 12:41 PM
I thought I was silly even posting a query!

Obviously been around for some time for the Romans to name them, I would hate to think what their type of surgery was!?!?

I tried my eyepice direct into the scope last night and found no floaters, 5 minutes looking down into the scope and there they were!

proof positive, unfortunately my scope is designed for the mirror and getting focus with the eyepice in straight is impossible, too short by 10mm or so.

Jonesy

nebularain
2003-Jun-11, 04:59 AM
Eyedrops don't help, neb; floaters are inside the eye.

Wild. The things they don't teach you in anatomy class . . . .