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View Full Version : Can anyone figure this out, which star or planet is it



skywatcher
2003-Jun-12, 12:10 PM
It seems to appear then disapeer.

The way it works is as follows
W20030112.0000.jpg === Jan 12/2003 12:00

Jan 12/2003-12:00pm
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030112.0000.jpg

May 10/2003--10:00pm
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030510.2200.jpg

May 12/2003--12:00pm
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030512.0000.jpg

June 07/2003--10:00pm
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2200.jpg

I am not sure if this could be the moon but it dont show up in last years pics at the same time...

AstroSmurf
2003-Jun-12, 12:21 PM
<sarcasm>Oh lookit, a webcam. Of course, it's ideal for astronomical observations.</sarcasm>

Too bright to be anything but the moon.
Also, the moon doesn't show up same time each year (check your calendar, damnit!)

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-12, 12:24 PM
Can you support your assertion that it didn't show up last year around the same dates, skywatcher?

I find it odd that you didn't just include a few links to pictures from last year as well.

Actually, I don't find it odd at all.

glen chapman
2003-Jun-12, 12:45 PM
Gonna have to do better than this. Some of us happen to know White Island is an active volcano in New Zealand. Its not the moon, not even the sky. Your looking at an eruption of a volcano.

Oh by the way. Do the maths. The moon can not be in the same place of the sky 12 months later. Luna cycle is 13 x 28 days. It is the main reason Easter doesn't fall on the same date each year.

Yes I do know why - but I'll let you go and find out.

Glen Chapman

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-12, 12:48 PM
Oooooh loook! An hour earlier! It's moving!

http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030112.2300.jpg

http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030112.2300.jpg

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-12, 12:52 PM
View in daylight. Skywatcher knows what he's doing.

http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030612.1000.jpg

http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030612.1000.jpg

skywatcher
2003-Jun-12, 01:35 PM
at 11:00pm, and then at 12:00pm but nothing at 10:00pm and 1:00am.

Is it actually the moon.

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-12, 01:59 PM
The daylight photo answers that question.

I mean, to anyone who isn't a troll , it shows why you only see the moon in the webcam for a short time.

I see no photos in this thread taken at high noon.

Why would you expect there to be a dark frame with the moon in it at high noon?

skywatcher
2003-Jun-12, 02:20 PM
but how did you findthat out with the day photo I am a little confused.

logicboy
2003-Jun-12, 02:30 PM
Maybe I am not getting the joke but it seems like you guys are being very rude to Skywatcher. A simple question was asked and multiple people responded insultingly. Please try to be more polite. People who insult other people for no reason are considered Trolls to me.

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-12, 02:58 PM
Logicboy, you are obviously unaware of skywatcher's history. He is a troll, pure and simple. Now, that is just my opinion, but it is not without a lot of evidence. I have already broken my promise of never responding to skywatcher again, but I justify that by saying that this isn't the PX forum.

Skywatcher's question is actually a PX question though. He is making a sideways attempt to say this is a photo of PX. If I were a moderator, I would move it to the PX area.

Skywatcher, how much of the sky is visible to that camera? Would the moon be in more images if the camera wasn't set to look at the crater? If it were tilted up higher, for instance?

Is 12:00pm midnight or noon, skywatcher?

skywatcher
2003-Jun-12, 03:30 PM
due to the angle of the camera only a certain amount of the moon would be visible in the sky,

logicboy
2003-Jun-12, 04:04 PM
due to the angle of the camera only a certain amount of the moon would be visible in the sky,



The GeoNet Project - Monitoring geological hazards in New Zealand

seems like a credible site to me


The GeoNet project team is pleased to announce their selection as one of the four finalists in the "Excellence in the Use of IT in Government" category of the Computerworld Excellence Awards 2003. The winner will be chosen on July 25.

what makes you think this is anything else other than a "sign of unrest"?


Skywatcher, Try to do a little bit more research before you post something like this.

planethollywood
2003-Jun-12, 04:30 PM
man he's getting annoying. Skywatcher whats your story morning glory? I hope its not someone just having a lend of us.

tracer
2003-Jun-13, 06:40 PM
at 11:00pm, and then at 12:00pm but nothing at 10:00pm and 1:00am.

Is it actually the moon.
If you mean that, on one given night, the object was not visible at 10 PM, visible at 11 PM and 12 midnight, and not visible at 1 AM, then it could certainly be the moon. At 10 PM, the moon might not have risen yet, depending on what phase the moon was in that night (which you can check by looking up the date in an almanac). Even after "moonrise", the moon might still be hidden behind the rim of that crater, which sticks up significantly above the horizon in the daylight photos. At 1 AM, the moon would have risen high enough to be above the top of the frame.

Does the webcam this picture was taken from have some kind of published rating for how sensitive it is to dim light?

LTC8K6
2003-Jun-13, 07:28 PM
Signs of the times #25. The two June links are pics of the moon from the same camera, which is actually looking at a volcano crater.

http://www.zetatalk.com/index/z03.htm

The white island crater cam.

http://www.geonet.org.nz/whiteisland.html

Note that Nancy also uses the same cam when the sun overwhelms it, as proof of PX.

http://www.zetatalk.com/teams/rogue/nancy176.htm

Jigsaw
2003-Jun-13, 08:41 PM
Skywatcher, what is the point of your post? What is your question?

You post four virtually identical pictures of the moon above White Island Crater, and then you say something like, "It seems to appear then disappear". Of COURSE the moon appears in a different place when you go out to look at it at different times of the night and at different times of the year. If you go outside anywhere in the world at midnight on January 12, and then at 10 p.m. on May 10, and at midnight on May 12, and at 10 p.m. on June 7, and look for the moon, the moon is going to be in a different place every time. That's just the way it works. It's like, if you go outside at noon on January 12, at 10 a.m. on May 10, at noon on May 12 and at 10 a.m. on June 7, and look for the sun, the sun is going to be in a different place every time.

And if you posted four virtually identical pictures of the Sun in a different place at four different times on four different dates, it would be equally pointless. So, again, what's your point?


and I am not sure if this could be the moon but it dont show up in last years pics at the same time...
That doesn't prove anything. If you look through the other webcam photos on the website (which is easily done by putting the date and time into the URL), you will see that most nights the pictures are totally black--no stars at all. This means that the webcam isn't sensitive enough to pick up the faint light from stars. It's designed to monitor the volcano, not the night sky.

However, some nights there is an obvious star in the photos. I am assuming that this very bright white star is probably Venus.

Here's the whole sequence of pictures from June 7.

Here's from 8 p.m.--nothing but Venus.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2000.jpg

Here's 9 p.m. See how the moon suddenly appears, and it's over to the right?
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2100.jpg

Now here's your picture from your OP. It's 10 p.m.. The moon moves over to the left.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2200.jpg

And now, an hour later, at 11 p.m., it's gone. And so is Venus, because Venus, like the Moon, also moves around from place to place in the sky.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2300.jpg

None of this means anything at all, other than "business as usual" up in the sky.

kilopi
2003-Jun-13, 11:37 PM
Here's the whole sequence of pictures from June 7.

Here's from 8 p.m.--nothing but Venus.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/volcams/W20030607.2000.jpg
Just a nit: that's not Venus, it's Jupiter. Venus is a morning star now.

Jigsaw
2003-Jun-14, 02:12 AM
Okay. I couldn't find an astronomical almanac offhand for Down Under, so I was just guessing.

tracer
2003-Jun-14, 02:33 AM
Note that Nancy also uses the same cam when the sun overwhelms it, as proof of PX.

http://www.zetatalk.com/teams/rogue/nancy176.htm
Heh. Nancy's calling it "The Red Star" (per an e-mail sent to her from a Korean reader who called it that). I wonder if she has any idea that a webcam optimized for bright daytime viewing might not render all colors with completely fidelity at night?

Jigsaw
2003-Jun-14, 03:35 AM
Tsk, tsk, someone's not paying attention. It's the "Red" star because...

...Planet X, as we have stated, is predominantly in the red light spectrum, appeared orange in early photos, and thus presented two personas during early imaging, one bending to gravity more than the other, though both are in the red spectrum. But the propensity of light to bend for many reasons has affected more than where Planet X is appearing, it has and is affecting where the Sun is appearing, particularly during the dawn and dusk when orange or other red light spectrum rays predominate.

See? Gravity is bending the red and orange light more, so it looks red and orange, depending on which persona it's imaging.

:D

http://zetatalk.com/index/zeta6.htm

Beaver
2003-Jun-15, 12:14 PM
I am not shure how you guys even argued about this one, didn't anybody notice that in the address bar it had org.nz/images/volcams.