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sarongsong
2003-Jun-13, 12:20 AM
"The goal of the project is to visit each of the latitude and longitude integer degree intersections in the world, and to take pictures at each location. The pictures and stories will then be posted here...there are still 13,587 to be found...there is one within 49 miles (79 km) of you if you're on the surface of Earth...(We've excluded confluences in the oceans and dropped some near the poles, but there are still 13,587 to be found):
http://www.confluence.org/

BigJim
2003-Jun-13, 12:23 AM
Interesting, but I don't really see any practical use for it.

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-13, 12:36 AM
Interesting, but I don't really see any practical use for it.

It's art - doesn't have to be practical. I love it already - am digging out the Ordnance Survey maps as we speak.

tracer
2003-Jun-13, 05:33 PM
I'll bet the 3/4 of all the integer latitude-longitude intersection points that are in the middle of an ocean are all going to look pretty similar.

maryellenandtom
2003-Jun-13, 06:43 PM
Not to mention the 360 longitude intersections at 89 degrees North (or South), which are only about 2 km apart.



math:
Earth equatorial radius = 6378 km (from Nine Planets (http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/nineplanets/nineplanets/data1.html))
Axial radius at 89 degrees N (or S) = 111 km
"Circumference" at 89 degrees = 699 km
Divide by 360 = 2 km

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-14, 02:08 AM
Not to mention the 360 longitude intersections at 89 degrees North (or South), which are only about 2 km apart.


Yeah - but that's all part of the fun. As a result, and in a strange little way, this site teaches something about geodesy. But it's better than that - I was fascinated by my local 'confluences' - 38 visited ones in the UK. An awful lot of people I know seem to think that the UK is entirely paved over - cities, out-of-town shopping malls, motorways. Yet there is nothing shown here but fields and the odd cowshed. A higher resolution grid-sampling might offer a different picture - but, anyway, as a participatory piece of conceptual art this site is excellent.

(Mind you I'm the kind of person who used to go round visiting all the Ordnance Survey trig points in my district, just so I could mark them up on the maps. Sad trainspotter syndrome.)

tracer
2003-Jun-14, 02:49 AM
So, at 90 degrees North Latitude and 90 degrees South Latitude, will they have to take 1 picture or 360 pictures?

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-14, 04:40 PM
So, at 90 degrees North Latitude and 90 degrees South Latitude, will they have to take 1 picture or 360 pictures?

I think either pole would count as one confluence by their definition:

http://www.confluence.org/country.php?id=6&showmap=true

(Heh - not too throughly covered - I wonder why?)

And here's the south pole page:

http://www.confluence.org/region.php?id=1323

The Arctic isn't listed - but I guess they're focused on landmasses, so it wouldn't feature. But here's Greenland:

http://www.confluence.org/country.php?id=107

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-14, 06:39 PM
Correction - The North Pole:

http://www.confluence.org/confluence.php?lat=90&lon=0&visit=1

Remarkable photo - but mightn't it have been a little risky surfacing those two subs so close to each other?

Jigsaw
2003-Jun-14, 09:08 PM
No use for it? No USE for it?? :eek:

Speak for yerself, buster. :D

I've already spent a wonderful ten minutes armchair traveling through Texas, China, and Japan, and I'm definitely going back there later.

And there are COMMENTARIES!! Whoa!! And EXTRA pictures besides the official "confluence" photo!! Dudes!!

It's an armchair traveler's wet dream, guys. Don't knock it if ya haven't tried it. :D

My favorite so far. (http://www.confluence.org/confluence.php?lat=39&lon=140&visit=1) Mr. and Mrs. Nobustugu don't, as they should, call the police to report a hitchhiking non-Japanese-speaking Crazy Person, but instead pick him up and drive him, with the aid of their dashboard-mounted GPS system, right to where the confluence is. A schoolyard full of children watch with interest. There are cherry blossoms.

I think it's a fabulous idea.

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-15, 01:08 AM
My favorite so far. (http://www.confluence.org/confluence.php?lat=39&lon=140&visit=1) Mr. and Mrs. Nobustugu don't, as they should, call the police to report a hitchhiking non-Japanese-speaking Crazy Person, but instead pick him up and drive him, with the aid of their dashboard-mounted GPS system, right to where the confluence is. A schoolyard full of children watch with interest. There are cherry blossoms.

I think it's a fabulous idea.

Yeah - after getting over the concept and scanning the photos, I started reading the stories, including the one above (Japan's an easy scan - because of the geometry, they don't have too many confluences for their population or land area.). I'm afraid that I'm going to be stuck on that site for a while. Some great stories...

...and it's an internet meme too. I just mentioned it to an archaeologist friend of mine who is off to Rumania on a field trip this summer and now she's off to see if she can file an unvisited confluence report - provided she can blag a GPS unit from a better-equipped colleague (most archaeologists are not terribly well-heeled, I've noticed)

kilopi
2003-Jun-15, 01:12 AM
?? You can buy a GPS unit that'll be accurate to 50 feet for $100 USAn. It would seem to me that any archeologist would have one, if only to get home again.

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-15, 01:21 AM
Sorry for double-posting - but this guy scooped the only confluence in the DMZ:

http://www.confluence.org/confluence.php?lat=17&lon=107

This still isn't completely explained:


I walked on down the road. The kids went to a certain spot and didn't go any farther. As soon as I was about 50 meters from them, they all began clapping to get my attention and yelling "No!! No!!" over and over again. I looked back and they were all waving me back and just kept yelling "No!!"
I figured they might be messing with me, but these were just little girls and I didn't think that they could keep from laughing if it was some joke. They looked dead serious.

I looked back down the road and thought about all the things I had read about mines and unexploded ordnance in the countryside. No, I decided, I was on a road, after all. A road with very big tracks on it, I noticed. Maybe from a jeep? Or some kind of military vehicle? Maybe there was an army camp down that road and they didn't want me to go there.

...but it all works out OK, because the confluence isn't in that direction anyway. But what were they warning him about?

Grand Vizier
2003-Jun-15, 01:42 AM
?? You can buy a GPS unit that'll be accurate to 50 feet for $100 USAn. It would seem to me that any archeologist would have one, if only to get home again.

Your point is taken, in the sense that any archaeological research team will for sure need one or, actually, lots of GPS units - but I'm talking about one person taking time out to pursue an individual project that isn't on the team agenda. Since you expect your research team to have their GPS stuff sorted, you don't necessarily own one yourself. And I repeat, grad students are not that well-heeled. Research teams know where they are - they're more worried about how crap the food is at the local hostelries than getting lost.

Now, if you were going to machete your way through Amazonia looking for lost civilisations - and if that were what archaeologists did - you'd be totally right, and any such person would be mad not to own a GPS unit. :)

Oh - and they're 100 plus in the UK. That makes them a pointless luxury, mostly (I'm waiting till I can get one for 50...)

nebularain
2003-Jun-15, 02:46 AM
No use for it? No USE for it?? :eek:

Speak for yerself, buster. :D


I completely agree! I can envision some very interesting school projects coming out of/utilizing this web site.

BigJim
2003-Jun-15, 02:53 AM
Well..... maybe it is practical in some way.

BigJim
2003-Jun-15, 03:20 AM
ALRIGHT! I ADMIT IT! I just spent over an hour at that site!