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View Full Version : Anger after a trip to the bookstore



BigJim
2003-Jun-15, 04:40 PM
Today was a bad day. Why? I went to Barnes and Noble and:

a) The Universe: 365 Days was there. I took it to the counter and found out that I was one dollar short! AHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

b) I found a copy of We Never Went to the Moon wedged between Flight: My Life in Mission Control and A Man on the Moon. THAT BOOK DOES NOT BELONG IN THE SCIENCE SECTION! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

Sorry, I've had an exhausting week and this just caps it off.

Glom
2003-Jun-15, 06:09 PM
b) I found a copy of We Never Went to the Moon wedged between Flight: My Life in Mission Control and A Man on the Moon. THAT BOOK DOES NOT BELONG IN THE SCIENCE SECTION! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

WHAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!?? SCUM OF THE EARTH, THE SOLAR SYSTEM, THE MILKY WAY AND THE ENTIRE PIGEONIFIED UNIVERSE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Can we think of some way to blame anti-nukyular protestors for this act of evil?

BigJim
2003-Jun-16, 08:41 PM
Can we think of some way to blame anti-nukyular protestors for this act of evil?

Yes - the radiation from nuclear reactors has baked the brains of the bookstore management so that they are unable to think logically.

Glom
2003-Jun-16, 08:43 PM
Um, we want to blame anti-nukyular protestors.

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Jun-16, 08:48 PM
Lack of radiation from the sun has caused the bookstore management's salads to wilt, thus depriving their brains of essential nutrients?

Glom
2003-Jun-16, 08:50 PM
That could work.

BigJim
2003-Jun-16, 08:53 PM
How about...

Because the anti-nukyular protestors have stopped us from replacing coal plants with nuclear plants, the radiation released from coal plants baked the brains of the bookstore workers.

Glom
2003-Jun-16, 08:55 PM
Yes, that's what I'm talking about. :D

Madcat
2003-Sep-12, 09:35 PM
That or the soot from the coal and oil powered plants blocks just enough sunlight that someone couldn't really see what (s)he was doing the day the placed the book.

R.A.F.
2003-Sep-12, 09:56 PM
Today was a bad day. Why? I went to Barnes and Noble and...

Say no more...I've had run-ins with Barnes and Nobel myself.

Recently, in the science section I found something titled "The Martian Mystery", authored by someone named Graham Hancock (or something like that). It was all about the Mars face..blah, blah, blah.

I've told the management before (when I've found mis-filed books) that it makes them look foolish to have pseudo-science books in the science section, but they just don't seem to care.

So instead of wasteing my time talking with the manager I did the right thing. I carefully took "The Martian Mystery" over to the "new age" section and stuck it right next to "Dark Moon". It fit there rather nicely. :D

gethen
2003-Sep-12, 10:14 PM
Well, not to gloat, (:roll: ) but, I found The Universe: 365 Days at my local booksellers, and kind of drooled over it for about two weeks before actually buying it. I couldn't believe it was still on the shelf. Perhaps the drool marks put other potential buyers off.

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Sep-13, 02:01 AM
Is that what those were? Eeewww.... I didn't want to touch them... :P

gethen
2003-Sep-13, 02:31 AM
Sorry, Canuck.

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Sep-13, 02:45 AM
Hey, after the Tim's incident, it's not a problem...

dgruss23
2003-Sep-13, 07:50 PM
BigJim wrote: b) I found a copy of We Never Went to the Moon wedged between Flight: My Life in Mission Control and A Man on the Moon. THAT BOOK DOES NOT BELONG IN THE SCIENCE SECTION! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

:lol: You've got to hand it to their persistence. I've seen creationist flyers shoved in between copies of Gould's and other evolution books at our local book stores. One time a prayer book was moved into the evolution section from the religion section of the store.

I wonder how often rational science minded folk think to do that sort of nonsense?

Stylesjl
2003-Sep-14, 01:03 AM
http://stylesjl.easy.dk3.com/Image :lol:

NASA Fan
2003-Sep-17, 01:38 AM
b) I found a copy of We Never Went to the Moon wedged between Flight: My Life in Mission Control and A Man on the Moon. THAT BOOK DOES NOT BELONG IN THE SCIENCE SECTION! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

So instead of wasteing my time talking with the manager I did the right thing. I carefully took "The Martian Mystery" over to the "new age" section and stuck it right next to "Dark Moon". It fit there rather nicely.

That was going to be my suggestion, take the book out, look at it in another section, and out of kindness for the hardworking employees, reshellf it in the sci-fi section...or it might be better to shelf it in some section that no-one looks in, such as "Canada"...runs and hides from all the Canadians...I love you and your beautiful country.

This is a big step for me, suggesting that you shelf something where it does not belong, it irks me when I cannot find what I am looking for, but then again, I do not suppose that there is a "real" place for that kind of trash...hey maybe

Papertraining your pooch
Pottytraining
Waste Management in Urban Locals
Trash Talk

Couldn't come with any other "appropriate" choises.

gethen
2003-Sep-18, 02:25 AM
You could use it to replace the now defunct Sears and Roebuck catalogues that once graced the outdoor facilities in rural areas.

robin
2003-Sep-18, 12:00 PM
There is hope. In my local branch of Blackwells, "The Stargate Conspiracy" and "God and the Evolving Universe" are prominently on display... in the Mythology section, either side of "The Oxford Campanion to Fairy Tales".

Glom
2003-Sep-18, 10:30 PM
The Stargate Conspiracy? Is that one of those nutters who think the stargate is actually real?

informant
2003-Sep-18, 10:37 PM
You mean like these nutters (http://www.badastronomy.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=3889)? ;)

Glom
2003-Sep-18, 10:40 PM
Exactly like that!

Glom
2003-Sep-18, 10:45 PM
bloody hell, that dragon guy was a bit insane

NASA Fan
2003-Sep-19, 01:31 AM
You could also type up a brief note to tuck into the book.

To Whom it may concern.

Yes, we did go to the moon. Arm yourself with just a little bit of knowledge and common scence and you too can see the error of their ways. There are many wonderfull books and webpages out there that will prove these twits wrong.

Thank You for your time, now go spend you money on something worthwile rather than this drivel.


See, I was pretty polite, and I was good I did not advertise one single book or website, where I might have looked like I was self-promoting.

Madcat
2003-Sep-19, 03:42 AM
You know, seriously, there is no appropriate place for books like that, including fiction. It's a lie presented as truth and distributing it is irresponsible.

The Supreme Canuck
2003-Sep-19, 03:58 AM
Well, they have a right to print and sell it. Free speech and all that...

kucharek
2003-Sep-19, 08:10 AM
You could also type up a brief note to tuck into the book.

To Whom it may concern.

Yes, we did go to the moon. Arm yourself with just a little bit of knowledge and common scence and you too can see the error of their ways. There are many wonderfull books and webpages out there that will prove these twits wrong.

Thank You for your time, now go spend you money on something worthwile rather than this drivel.


See, I was pretty polite, and I was good I did not advertise one single book or website, where I might have looked like I was self-promoting.

When I find such books in the library, I take it home and put some appropriate URLs into some places. Then I give it back. ;-)

robin
2003-Sep-19, 01:26 PM
You know, seriously, there is no appropriate place for books like that, including fiction. It's a lie presented as truth and distributing it is irresponsible.

Well I, for one, would be sorry to see them go. I love reading cranks' writings. Yes, I like laughing at them, but I also find it fascinating to try to work out what was going on in their heads.

I had a look through the Stargate Conspiracy today. It's a wonderful piece of crank writing. At first, it seems to be an anti-crank book, debunking all the cults that claimed the Ancient Egyptian gods were really aliens and discussing how the cults arose.

But it turns out to be a crank book after all. Their claim is that all the cults were started deliberately, by a conspiracy involving the FBI and the CIA and all the usual suspects, to undermine democracy. Their aim was for everyone to be a member of one cult or another, so everyone would be obeying the orders of a member of the conspiracy.

It seems the authors debunked so many woo-woos that they began to think there couldn't really be that many stupid people in the world, could there? It has to be a conspiracy. I think there's a lesson there for us all.

jgravatt
2003-Oct-13, 02:40 PM
I was also angered recently at books a million. I asked to be directed to the astronomy section. The employee took me around the store, and i found myself staring at new age and astrology crap. She was obviously confused! I've yet to return.

informant
2003-Oct-13, 02:48 PM
...And people wonder why anyone listens to Nancy Lieder. Clearly, there are folks out there who can't tell science from fairy tales.

Bawheid
2003-Oct-13, 03:03 PM
You know, seriously, there is no appropriate place for books like that, including fiction. It's a lie presented as truth and distributing it is irresponsible.

Well I, for one, would be sorry to see them go. I love reading cranks' writings. Yes, I like laughing at them, but I also find it fascinating to try to work out what was going on in their heads.

I had a look through the Stargate Conspiracy today. It's a wonderful piece of crank writing. At first, it seems to be an anti-crank book, debunking all the cults that claimed the Ancient Egyptian gods were really aliens and discussing how the cults arose.

But it turns out to be a crank book after all.

I am the proud owner of a copy of the Stargate Conspiracy and it easily the worst book I own, and I have a copy of Oliver North's autobiography. I did buy it knowing it was a nonsense but it turned out to be worse, in fact it is (chooses word carefully for Gethen's benefit) codswallop.

robin
2003-Oct-13, 04:02 PM
I am the proud owner of a copy of the Stargate Conspiracy and it easily the worst book I own, and I have a copy of Oliver North's autobiography. I did buy it knowing it was a nonsense but it turned out to be worse, in fact it is (chooses word carefully for Gethen's benefit) codswallop.

Most crankery isn't pleasant to read in detail, but it still fascinates me that it exists. I find it fun to treat them as puzzles, to work out how they arrived at such a view of the world. Some are more interesting than others, of course. If they've just made a mistake, that's not too exciting; the best cranks take a very few facts and spin a whole alternate world out of them. If they start flitting randomly between physics, metaphysics, mathematics and history, you've hit gold.

As I said, I just looked through Stargate Conspiracy in the bookshop, and I was intrigued. But if it's not so amusing once you get into it, I'll take your word for that.

Bawheid
2003-Oct-13, 04:06 PM
It is the usual start with a fact, take the obvious conclusion, move on to the next logical position, and on and on, except the obvious conclusion is suspect and the logic is dubious. It isn't even internally consistent.

Buy a good book instead. :)

robin
2003-Oct-13, 04:23 PM
Sounds like just the sort of thing I enjoy, the way you put it. But then, I'm weird. :)

Maksutov
2004-Feb-12, 08:56 AM
I was also angered recently at books a million. I asked to be directed to the astronomy section. The employee took me around the store, and i found myself staring at new age and astrology crap. She was obviously confused! I've yet to return.

You remember Carl Sagan's story about being a kid in Brooklyn, going to the library, and asking for literature about stars. He wound up being given a bunch of Hollywood fan magazines. #-o

Spacewriter
2004-Feb-12, 08:01 PM
I posted a rant on my own blog a while back about a foray I made to Barnes and Noble late last year. We were looking to see if they had copies of my book in stock yet. It's an astronomy book, so we started looking on our own for the science section. We found 8 rows (ROWS) of mythology, pseudo-science, New Age Crystal bunkum, religious prophecies, and other such stuff, but couldn't find the science section.

Finally I asked and the dweeb at the desk looked thoughtful, then puzzled, then frustrated, then got a piece of paper out to check it. Then he brightened up and said, "I think we have a few science books over in the computer section."

Sure enough they did, over in the corner, facing a back wall, have a couple of shelves of science, shoehorned into the computers and languages section. No signage. No nothin'. Not even my book, although I understand that it wasn't in stock at that time.

I don't recommend B&N to anybody who is serious about finding science books. Their selection is, shall we say, a bit lacking. Borders is a little better, but there's a reason I point people to Amazon on my web site (aside from the referral points). They do have access to everything.

Of course, if I know about indy booksellers, I recommend folks try them too... the best one I ever cultivated was Tattered Cover Books in Denver.

milli360
2004-Feb-13, 07:01 PM
Of course, if I know about indy booksellers, I recommend folks try them too... the best one I ever cultivated was Tattered Cover Books in Denver.
I used to go there and browse. Nice place, but I can be happy almost anywhere.

Maksutov
2004-Feb-20, 11:07 PM
I think libraries were invented, in part, for crank books. That way we can read them without buying them. :wink:

Taibak
2004-Feb-21, 04:02 AM
I posted a rant on my own blog a while back about a foray I made to Barnes and Noble late last year. We were looking to see if they had copies of my book in stock yet. It's an astronomy book, so we started looking on our own for the science section. We found 8 rows (ROWS) of mythology, pseudo-science, New Age Crystal bunkum, religious prophecies, and other such stuff, but couldn't find the science section.

Finally I asked and the dweeb at the desk looked thoughtful, then puzzled, then frustrated, then got a piece of paper out to check it. Then he brightened up and said, "I think we have a few science books over in the computer section."

Sure enough they did, over in the corner, facing a back wall, have a couple of shelves of science, shoehorned into the computers and languages section. No signage. No nothin'. Not even my book, although I understand that it wasn't in stock at that time.

I don't recommend B&N to anybody who is serious about finding science books. Their selection is, shall we say, a bit lacking. Borders is a little better, but there's a reason I point people to Amazon on my web site (aside from the referral points). They do have access to everything.

Of course, if I know about indy booksellers, I recommend folks try them too... the best one I ever cultivated was Tattered Cover Books in Denver.

To be honest, that sounds more like a case of the person in charge of that section not doing his or her job. At the Barnes and Noble in Saugus, MA, where I work, we keep our science section well stocked. It's also on the other end of the building from the New Age section (which, incidentally, is further away from the fiction section than I'd like :roll: ). The astronomy bay is even the best in that section. I enjoy poking through it on breaks. :D

Spacewriter
2004-Feb-21, 05:24 AM
To be honest, that sounds more like a case of the person in charge of that section not doing his or her job. At the Barnes and Noble in Saugus, MA, where I work, we keep our science section well stocked. It's also on the other end of the building from the New Age section (which, incidentally, is further away from the fiction section than I'd like :roll: ). The astronomy bay is even the best in that section. I enjoy poking through it on breaks. :D

Hmmm... Saugus is pretty far away for me. If it was closer, I'd give it a try. I tried another B&N over in Natick (I think) and ran into the same problem; hidden science books, few good pickings, etc. Do managers have leeway in how much they stock of a certain topic?

I also went over to Tatnuck in Worcester and found it to be okay... still a little light on the science in favor of new age crystally stuff, but they do have a nice restaurant...

;)

milli360
2004-Feb-21, 09:51 AM
Do managers have leeway in how much they stock of a certain topic?
Are you thinking perhaps you live in a woo-woo infested part of town? :)

Spacewriter
2004-Feb-22, 04:17 PM
Do managers have leeway in how much they stock of a certain topic?
Are you thinking perhaps you live in a woo-woo infested part of town? :)

No, not really. I now have two data points for B&N and one for Tatnuck, so I don't have a trend; just a suggestion that some topics (science) don't sell as well as others (new age crystal hand wavy feel-good aromatherapy-will-awaken-your-inner-aura stuff).

The two B&Ns were in Natick and Nashua (maybe it's something to do with the letter "N")...

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Mar-09, 03:01 PM
A credit card and amazon.com shall set ye free.

I think I personally kept amazon's West Coast operations alive during their early years.

HenrikOlsen
2004-Apr-12, 05:38 PM
You know, seriously, there is no appropriate place for books like that, including fiction. It's a lie presented as truth and distributing it is irresponsible.

Stick them with the other religious writings?

Or roleplaying sourcebooks?
I can think of several of the woo-woo books you could base an alternate earth style game on.

PeterFab
2004-Apr-13, 07:35 AM
Or roleplaying sourcebooks?
I can think of several of the woo-woo books you could base an alternate earth style game on.
It has been done, sort of.
Kenneth Hite's books 'Suppressed Transmissons' and 'Suppressed Transmissions 2' contains articles meant to add spice to roleplaying games.
In ST2 there is an article 'One Giant Leap After Anaother: Lunatic Theories' where he mentions Richard Hoagland's theories.

AstroSmurf
2004-Apr-14, 05:11 PM
The "GURPS Mars" sourcebook was kinda interesting that way. It included several scenarios, from more realistic to fairly "out there". Interestingly, the author(s) was definitely of the opinion that Hoagland and Velikovskiy are on drugs, though the ideas might be used for entertainment purposes.

PeterFab
2004-Apr-15, 06:21 AM
The "GURPS Mars" sourcebook was kinda interesting that way. It included several scenarios, from more realistic to fairly "out there". Interestingly, the author(s) was definitely of the opinion that Hoagland and Velikovskiy are on drugs, though the ideas might be used for entertainment purposes.

Yes, I liked GURPS Mars too. And Ken Hite definetely also considers Hoagland and Velikovsky to be out of contact with the real universe, but good for gaming.

Tensor
2004-Apr-15, 07:34 PM
Interestingly, the author(s) was definitely of the opinion that Hoagland and Velikovskiy are on drugs, though the ideas might be used for entertainment purposes.

Sorta like we use them for entertainment purposes....

Zac
2004-Apr-30, 07:13 PM
You know, seriously, there is no appropriate place for books like that, including fiction. It's a lie presented as truth and distributing it is irresponsible.

As the great prophet Sagan once said in regard to Velikovsky's idea that Venus was spat out of the Jovian system and wrecked havoc in the solar system (being responsible for many of the events descibed in the bible) until it settled into it's current orbit:

"There are hypotheses in science that are wrong. That's perfectly all right, it's the aperture to finding out what's right. Science is a self correcting process. To be accepted new ideas must survive the most rigorous standards of evidence and scrutiny. The worst aspect of the Velikovsky affair is not that many of his ideas were wrong or silly or in gross contradiction of the facts, rather, the worst aspect is that some scientists tried to surpress Velikovsky's idea. The suppression of uncomfortable ideas may be common in religion or politics, but it is not the path to knowledge, and there's no place for it in the endeavour of science. We do not know beforehand where fundamental insights will arise from about our mysterious and lovely solar system. The history of our solar system shows clearly that accepted and conventional ideas, are often wrong and that fundamental insights can arise from the most unexpected sources."

mickal555
2004-May-30, 09:07 AM
Hello
every time I go into a newsagent and ask for the astronomy section looking for sky and space magazine (I havent found yet). They just stare blankly at me 8-[ and I get embarresed (I am 13) and take me to the astrology/new age section witch is what the plastic card says (nothing about science up there), and mixed into the astrology/new age are the science and astronomy magazines they havent even got a section to themselves its like they have been sqashed into UFO sightings and rubish
its very sad :( . They never help me.

aurora
2004-May-30, 02:29 PM
A credit card and amazon.com shall set ye free.

I think I personally kept amazon's West Coast operations alive during their early years.

I really like Powells, they have a web site at powells.com

I like the way they handle used books better than the way amazon does it.