PDA

View Full Version : Spitzer Locates a Binary Pair of Black Holes



Fraser
2007-May-31, 07:56 PM
A clever trick has enabled NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope to calculate the distance to a distant object, confirming that it's part of our Milky Way. An even more intriguing finding is that the object is probably a binary pair of black holes, orbiting one another - an extremely rare thing to see. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/05/31/spitzer-locates-a-binary-pair-of-black-holes/)

George
2007-Jun-02, 08:29 PM
This has to be the best ever parallax measurement. I wonder what distance they measured, though?

Nick4
2007-Jun-06, 05:41 AM
Im a little confused...dosent black holes trap light? so how do you even see a black hole? if they are just guessing and saying that you cant see any light behind it from stars so it has to be a black hole then couldent it also be a dark nebula? I dunno im just a little confused on this one. how can you mesure something you cant see?

George
2007-Jun-06, 01:49 PM
Im a little confused...dosent black holes trap light? so how do you even see a black hole? Yes, good point. :)


An even more intriguing finding is that the object is probably a binary pair of black holes, orbiting one another - an extremely rare thing to see. There is some humor in this since black holes can not directly be seen, only the powerful circumstantial evidence is seen (which is really what the mean, of course). :)

In this rare case, the evidence suggests a pair of black holes are nearly perfectly aligned with a more distant bright star causing the star to dim and brighten in a cyclical pattern. The evidence, apparently, supports the claim that a black hole binary system, which allows microlensing, is the cause for the magnitude variations.