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Gillianren
2007-Jun-06, 07:21 PM
So there's a new show on Tuesday nights on the (US) History Channel called The Universe. Last night, it was talking about the Sun. Neat show; jam-packed with astronomers, including several who would be very familiar to folks around here.

During all this talk about the Sun, they mentioned the bits of it that are driven by magnetism, etc.--not just gravity and fusion. What are the odds that an EU proponent would know or care that a clearly mainstream show talked so much about magnetism on the Sun?

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-06, 07:40 PM
So there's a new show on Tuesday nights on the (US) History Channel called The Universe. Last night, it was talking about the Sun.
Huh? Different time or cable? I watched yesterday at 9pm EDT, and it was about Mars.

Neat show; jam-packed with astronomers, including several who would be very familiar to folks around here.
I was impressed myself. One of the better things on the History channel lately. Most of the stuff they presented was old, but I'm sure that's only because I've been paying attention to this stuff.

Edit:
Never mind, it looks like they do the new and previous one back to back. You saw the show from last week, I saw the new one. You can catch up, I can't.

ToSeek
2007-Jun-06, 08:04 PM
A little more apocalyptic than I thought was strictly necessary, but well-done overall.

Jim
2007-Jun-06, 09:14 PM
Uh, ToSeeked (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=1002425#post1002425).

Gillian, be sure to catch the rerun of the Mars episode; maybe it will take the taste of that Hoagland site out of your mouth.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-06, 09:51 PM
Well, see, that's what I get for not reading that section of the board. Still, I do think it belongs here, too, for what that's worth.

Yeah, I missed the first one. The irritating thing is that I'd seen part of the Sun one before and couldn't understand why they were repeating it. But hey, next week, I'll watch Mars and big scary asteroids. That'll be fun, right?

NEOWatcher
2007-Jun-07, 12:57 PM
Well, see, that's what I get for not reading that section of the board. Still, I do think it belongs here, too, for what that's worth.
I agree with you there. The UT and BA site related forums tend to cycle alot, and even though it may be a somewhat popular thread, it seems to drop off really quick.

OneHotJupiter
2007-Jun-07, 03:21 PM
I found that Mars episode to be a bit boring , not much that I didn't already know , but at least it wasan't another Jusus or Hitler show , which the History channel never gets tired of , I can just skip the killer asteroid episode coming up , seen about 10 of those too , Where are all the shows about Apollo or better yet actual Astronomy?!

ToSeek
2007-Jun-09, 01:03 AM
So, three episodes into a series called "Universe", and we haven't gotten past the asteroid belt yet?

Ara Pacis
2007-Jun-09, 02:03 AM
So, three episodes into a series called "Universe", and we haven't gotten past the asteroid belt yet?

I think they're going one object at a time.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-09, 04:14 AM
I think they're going one object at a time.

Yup. It's going to take a while, but they're set for as many seasons as they can go!

publiusr
2007-Jun-09, 07:07 PM
The SUN was the best so far. Great images. Ed Tufte would be pleased.

Rastermon2
2007-Sep-12, 12:05 AM
I was suprised by their claim that the Sun's corona was millions of degrees by the vibration of the sound (all the explosions) that the sun makes.
I thought there was no sound in space... or is there enought plasma to transmit it?
I found another explaination from Scientific American
<link>http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleID=B8846D2C-E7F2-99DF-3A324674FBF4FB3D&chanID=sa026 </link>

"The findings point to magnetic field ripples known as Alfvén waves whipping plasma back and forth, releasing heat, according to a report published online by Science. "

Vonstadt
2007-Sep-12, 01:16 AM
So far I have been very happy with the show, though I wasnt bored with Mars episode (I'm a self proclaimed Mars nut as well as a Moon nut :p) Though it was a nice break from some of the recent programming on the channel!

I'm looking forward to more of the show if it maintains this quality of content!

SkepticJ
2007-Sep-12, 03:11 AM
I thought there was no sound in space... or is there enought plasma to transmit it?



There isn't, in a vacuum. The corona isn't a vacuum. Think of it as the atmosphere of the sun. Make enough noise and even the thinnest "air" will get very hot.

vonmazur
2007-Sep-12, 09:15 PM
I was wondering, just how big did an ancient first gen star have to be, to make Uranium when it collapsed?? They did not cover that in the big bang/neutron star episode. They got as far as iron, and went on to something else....

Dale in Ala

Lord Jubjub
2007-Sep-12, 11:21 PM
Iron is as far as any stable star will get. Any element beyond iron (and including iron) will absorb energy when fused. All elements beyond iron are created when the star supernovas as a result of the iron core.

KaiYeves
2007-Sep-12, 11:29 PM
(I'm a self proclaimed Mars nut as well as a Moon nut :p)

Et tu, Vonstadt. Onward and upward. I saw the Jupiter episode and the ET episode, and they seemed very, very nice. The History Channel is good and bad in equal measure. But why, oh why did they replace Josh Bernstein? He's awesome, and my mom has a crush on him.

Bearded One
2007-Sep-12, 11:55 PM
I've only seen a few episodes of this series, but have most of them recorded waiting to be watched. Isn't this the series that is involved in the conspiracy to eliminate Pioneer 10 and 11 from history? :lol:

(They claimed, more than once, that Voyagers 1 & 2 were the first of mankind's spacecraft to visit Jupiter and Saturn.)