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View Full Version : Most Distant Black Hole Discovered



Fraser
2007-Jun-07, 04:47 PM
An international team of astronomers have discovered a supermassive black hole at the very edge of the observable Universe, located 13 billion light-years away. ...

Read the full blog entry (http://www.universetoday.com/2007/06/07/most-distant-black-hole-discovered/)

Nick4
2007-Jun-08, 01:28 AM
Ther has been a lot of talk about black holes latly...why?

Fraser
2007-Jun-08, 01:46 AM
Astronomers just had the American Astronomical Society meeting in Hawaii, so they were presenting many new black hole stories. It'll settle down for a while.

someguy44
2007-Jun-08, 05:18 AM
This thing's 500 million times the size of the Sun and yet, it's 13 billion years old. Can you imagine what the size of this thing is right now after 13 billion years of feasting. :eek:

John Mendenhall
2007-Jun-11, 03:10 PM
This thing's 500 million times the size of the Sun and yet, it's 13 billion years old. Can you imagine what the size of this thing is right now after 13 billion years of feasting. :eek:

It's now so large it's devouring the entire universe. At any moment now we may cease to . . .

Ed999
2007-Aug-13, 06:08 PM
I've never understood why astronomers persist in claiming that light from an object 13 billion light years away will take 13 billion years to reach us. The steady-state theory of the universe was discredited decades ago!

For light to take 13 billion years to reach us implies that we have always been a distance of 13 billion light years away from it, which is impossible in an expanding universe.

For example, 6.35 billion years ago, the universe was only half its present size. So it would then only have taken 6.35 billion years for light from the most distant objects to reach us. Therefore, the light coming from them should have reached us 6.35 billion years ago (if the speed of the expansion has been constant).

Unless the universe has (either at some point or continuously) been expanding at a speed greater than the speed of light, which seems unlikely, then the light coming from a distant object cannot have taken the entire age of the universe to reach us, because we were formerly much closer to it.

In point of fact, the big-bang theory puts us at the exact same point in space as this distant object when time began.

Suppose the object in question still exists (which seems unlikely, because by definition it existed 13 billion years *ago*). And suppose it to have been located all along on the exact opposite edge of the universe. This would imply that both it and we have been travelling away from each other, in opposite directions, each at a speed of almost half the speed of light relative to the original point of expansion, i.e. at about 99% of the speed of light relative to each other, for its light to have taken so long to reach us.

Unlikely, for many reasons, but at least it would avoid the need for one or other of us to have been travelling faster than light.

It would, however, seem to invalidate Einstein's theory that the speed of light is absolute. But there appears no other explanation for our ability to have been rushing away from this light for so long, unless we have at some point actually exceeded the speed of light.

Did the big bang perhaps actually hurl us 13 billion light years across space in an instant?

Yet we can't really suppose that the distant object is directly opposite us on the other side of the universe, and travelling away from us. If its light is 13 billion years old, the light ought to be coming from where the object originally was, 13 billion years ago: i.e. from the original point of expansion. If so, we *must* have travelled faster than light, to have stayed ahead of the light coming from it for all this time.

Unless we were never there. Perhaps the big bang actually did hurl us 13 billion light years across space in an instant!