PDA

View Full Version : How much do you spend on Air Conditioning



crosscountry
2007-Jun-07, 07:39 PM
Here in Germany if you want an AC you'd better buy a nice car, because they don't exist in the houses or buildings I frequent.

A friend of mine mentioned he had turned his A/C off so far this year (in Illinois) and saves more than $100 per month. He works during the day and most of his kids are in school.

To that replied another friend (in North Carolina) that he keeps his house at an even 76 all summer long and even with levelled billing (semi-equal payments throughout the year) he still pays between $450 and $470 per month.



I told him that would go a long way for me.


So how much does A/C cost you? and is the price worth it?



Of course it is in most cases. My grandmother lives in Dallas where it can be above 100F or 42+C all summer long. I'm happy she can afford to keep the house cool.

Fazor
2007-Jun-07, 07:52 PM
I don't have A/C at home. I'm considering it, but we've made it through two very hot summers the past two years. I really worry most for my dogs, they're both very long-haired dogs who love cold weather; so when it's 89 Degrees(f)+, it's hard on them.

The only other part I don't like is after working for hours in the yard, for instance, or playing baseball for hours, I don't have a place to go to relax and cool off. If it's too bad I usually just hop in my car and drive around with the a/c on; but with gas prices where they're at, I won't do that anymore.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-07, 08:05 PM
I take a cool or cold shower after mowing the lawn

(or my personal favorite) jump in a pool. Nothing feels better than jumping in a pool after mowing the lawn on a hot day.


well, nothing that you do without a partner.

ToSeek
2007-Jun-07, 08:19 PM
We have an end-unit townhouse at the north end of our row and a huge sycamore tree southeast of us. We probably run our wall-mounted air conditioner no more than six or seven hours a day even on the worst days. It might cost us $100 or so during a hot month, not really sure. We have electric heat, so it's the wintertime when the bills are high - summer's a dottle by comparison.

nauthiz
2007-Jun-07, 08:22 PM
I haven't had A/C for years. It's not worth the money (I was paying a couple hundred a month) and there are only a few days a year that are really uncomfortable where I live. On those days I take it as a good excuse to go see a movie or hang out in an air conditioned cafe or something.

I've also noticed that living without A/C seems to make the summers feel less hot overall. Presumably because my body quits whining and gets used to the heat, making me able to actually go outside and enjoy myself during the summer.

Fazor
2007-Jun-07, 08:24 PM
My utility bills (my city puts Gas, Sewer, Water, and Sanitation all into one bill) go from about $250/month in the winter to about $70 in the summer. Electric bill, since as I meantioned I am sans AC stays about the same. Which is good, because that leaves more money for me to buy steaks and ribs and such to grill out during the summer. :)

tofu
2007-Jun-07, 08:28 PM
My house is heated with natural gas, and I use florescent lightbulbs, so theoretically, the major difference between my January and July electric bill should be air conditioner (actually, I suppose I wash more clothes in the summer because of sweat).

I actually have three years worth of electic bills in a spreadsheet. Here's what the data looks like:
http://www.maj.com/gallery/tofu/babb/electricbills.gif

The summer peak happens in september of each year. That probably indicates a lag from when the meter is read to when I the bill is sent.

pzkpfw
2007-Jun-07, 08:35 PM
...well there's a clear global warming trend!

:-)

tofu
2007-Jun-07, 08:38 PM
...well there's a clear global warming trend!

I currently have five computers and two tivos running. There's no telling how much electricity all of that burns. If I was still married, I'm sure I would be feeling the hockey stick - on my rear end!

I'm a bit ashamed of all that and have plans afoot to reduce it by making better use of vmware and LCD monitors.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-07, 08:49 PM
...well there's a clear global warming trend!


or the obvious.... electricity prices are going up.

Delvo
2007-Jun-07, 09:40 PM
Here in Germany if you want an AC you'd better buy a nice car, because they don't exist in the houses or buildings I frequent.That is a convenience of living someplace where it never really gets hot. Somewhere between 26 and 27 degrees C (about 80 F), they start closing businesses and schools for the "heat emergency". At 82 degrees (still less than 28 C), I saw someone who had passed out on the street, supposedly from the heat according to the other people around, who all apparently took it naturally that passing out is a normal thing to happen in the horrible oppressive temperatures at such an extreme as 80 or more degrees.

It's hard to find anyplace in the USA's contiguous 48 states that temperatures in the mid-90s weren't completely normal routine day after day for at least a few months of the year. That's around 35 to you Germans. Your "closing everything down and passing out" weather is a relaxing cool summer day to us, even cooler than the lowest point during we'll reach during some summer nights. And although we do get a few nice breaks in the summer when the temperature drops that low for a few days before returning to the normal above 90, we'll also have just as many days that vary that far in the other direction and end up over 100, even over 110 in some places. (38-43 or more)

Every summer, some number of deaths of medically vulnerable people are attributed to the heat in their homes without air conditioning.


A friend of mine mentioned he had turned his A/C off so far this year (in Illinois) and saves more than $100 per month. He works during the day and most of his kids are in school.I can picture that. It makes no more than a few dozen dollars of difference for me, but my home is small and there's one big room I close off from the rest and don't even cool at all. (I even use it for drying my clothes without using energy to run a dryer! :D)


To that replied another friend (in North Carolina) that he keeps his house at an even 76 all summer long and even with levelled billing (semi-equal payments throughout the year) he still pays between $450 and $470 per month.Something's wrong there. It sounds like the air conditioning machine has a machanical problem, or this "house" is a gigantic mansion where the windows are always open, or he got suckered with a really bad deal with this "levelling" program that ends up costing more than the real costs of cooling. This doesn't sound like a realistic number for anywhere near normal circumstances.

JohnD
2007-Jun-07, 09:54 PM
Air conditioning?

I open a window!

John

crosscountry
2007-Jun-07, 10:47 PM
That is a convenience of living someplace where it never really gets hot. Somewhere between 26 and 27 degrees C (about 80 F), they start closing businesses and schools for the "heat emergency". At 82 degrees (still less than 28 C), I saw someone who had passed out on the street, supposedly from the heat according to the other people around, who all apparently took it naturally that passing out is a normal thing to happen in the horrible oppressive temperatures at such an extreme as 80 or more degrees.

It's hard to find anyplace in the USA's contiguous 48 states that temperatures in the mid-90s weren't completely normal routine day after day for at least a few months of the year. That's around 35 to you Germans. Your "closing everything down and passing out" weather is a relaxing cool summer day to us, even cooler than the lowest point during we'll reach during some summer nights. And although we do get a few nice breaks in the summer when the temperature drops that low for a few days before returning to the normal above 90, we'll also have just as many days that vary that far in the other direction and end up over 100, even over 110 in some places. (38-43 or more)




I'm going to bet I am from a warmer climate than you. Germany has been my home for 9 months now, and 2 more to go till I move back to Texas.

korjik
2007-Jun-07, 10:48 PM
Y'all can consider yourselves to have had nasty things said to you :)

Judging by my nov, and march bills (min elec used) AC costs about $100-$120a month in the summer here in Houston. The cost is very temp dependent, since my elec bills go from about $30 at min to $150 at max.

korjik
2007-Jun-07, 10:51 PM
It's hard to find anyplace in the USA's contiguous 48 states that temperatures in the mid-90s weren't completely normal routine day after day for at least a few months of the year. That's around 35 to you Germans. Your "closing everything down and passing out" weather is a relaxing cool summer day to us, even cooler than the lowest point during we'll reach during some summer nights. And although we do get a few nice breaks in the summer when the temperature drops that low for a few days before returning to the normal above 90, we'll also have just as many days that vary that far in the other direction and end up over 100, even over 110 in some places. (38-43 or more)



mid-90s is still pretty bad in the northern states. Heat in the north is still a bigger killer than hurricanes. It is true tho that 80s is cool for us here in Houston tho.

Frantic Freddie
2007-Jun-07, 11:11 PM
Here in the desert Southwest we use swamp coolers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swamp_cooler).
Our electric bill doesn't go up,I imagine we use the same amount of power as the heater & our water bill goes up $2-3 a month.

Bearded One
2007-Jun-07, 11:11 PM
My summer A/C costs are about $150-$250 a month. That's for a one bedroom apartment in northeastern Illinois. I pretty much start running the A/C in April and use it through November or so. That's not saying I run it constantly during the earlier and later months, but I do start or continue to use it during those months.

My rent here is decent, but I lose the savings on A/C bills :(

My high A/C cost is because of a few reasons:

1. Top floor apartment with no shade and direct afternoon sun.

2. Poor window placement for ventilation.

3. Poor attic ventilation in this building (I suspect) .

4. 15 computers :lol:

About a month and a half ago I left early in the day expecting to be back mid to late afternoon. I left the windows open and a large fan in one blowing outwards, A/C was off. Outside temps hit the low to mid 80s that day. I got tied up and didn't return home till almost 11:00pm at night. My apartment was in the mid 90s average and I suspect some corners were pushing 100+. Did a quick check of my Email and tried to save an attachment from my brother. I got a write error from the file server. I tried again and discovered I was getting a lot of write errors and a few computers were locked up. Found the drives had failed due to overheating, not only was the temperature hot, but I discovered the cooling vents on the server were pretty much clogged solid.

I installed my auxiliary A/C unit that night, it's for my bedroom and that's where the file server is. This was the earliest I ever had to install that unit, usually my living room unit is sufficient till mid May.

Maksutov
2007-Jun-07, 11:34 PM
I currently have five computers and two tivos running....

4. 15 computers :lol: What do you do with all those computers? Are you your own ISPs (as well as for many others)?

:think:

Meanwhile the house in Connecticut had built-in air conditioning. It was one mile from the ocean. Just open all the windows and left the afternoon sea breeze do its thing.

But here just south of Memphis AC is necessary late April through late October. For ~2500 sq. ft, it's about 125 a month (new house, lots of tight insulation, electronic thermostat).

Lord Jubjub
2007-Jun-07, 11:34 PM
mid-90s is still pretty bad in the northern states. Heat in the north is still a bigger killer than hurricanes. It is true tho that 80s is cool for us here in Houston tho.

It was 81 F (27 C) in Houston at 6:00 this morning. High temperatures are expected to be at least 91 F (32 C) every day until at least the end of the month. Except for the occasional midday rainstorm this will last until the end of September. Those midday rainstorms bring the temperature down to about 86 F (30 C) with a humidity to match.

I'm really not sure I like midday rainstorms in Houston (evening storms are a different matter).

Tinaa
2007-Jun-08, 12:45 AM
Current conditions as of 6:51 pm CDT
Fair 89

Feels Like:
97
Barometer:
29.70 in and steady
Humidity:
61%

It is hot here on S. Texas. WE have had the A/C on since February. The humidity is a killer.

Our electric bill runs $110 in the winter (warm winters) but can run up to $270 in the summer.

Bearded One
2007-Jun-08, 01:13 AM
What do you do with all those computers? Are you your own ISPs (as well as for many others)?

I counted my Tivo as a computer. Two are file servers, places to put hard drives. One of those is also a Windows domain controller that provides DHCP, DNS and user authentication for the rest of the network as well as file services. There's an old laptop that serves as a backup domain controller so I can still log in when I have the main server down. I also have two Internet gateway machines, all my Internet traffic is routed through those. I get more control that way than I do with a dedicated hardware router. There's also a defunct Internet gateway, It's lost it's purpose in life :(

My main work desk has four computers, two are hooked up to the center monitor/keyboard through a switchbox, one runs Windows and the other runs Linux. I can switch worlds with a keystroke. I also have a laptop to my left and another computer set up to my right.

The one on my right is a workhouse, downloading, editing and processing large files, mostly video. I give it stuff to do and then forget about it for a while without having to worry about messing up the operation via me playing around :) I "work" mostly on the Linux box, switching to the Windows box to do DVD burning in the "background". The laptop gets miscellaneous use.

I also have a computer by my "TV" couch. That explains why I can never pay much attention to TV anymore, everytime the show gets a little boring I end up either cruising the Net or playing a game and forgeting about the show :lol: There's another laptop nearby that serves as a A/V server for the TV, it's connected to the TV input so I can watch computer videos and stuff directly on the TV. My Tivo can do that as well to a more limited degree.

After that, there's another laptop that doesn't do much. It runs the Tivo Desktop program that ports audio files to my TV via my Tivo. There's a 233 mhz Pentium 1 that would be in the junkyard except that it has a 5 1/4" floppy drive and a controller that supports single density. It can read old floppies and I like to keep it around for that reason. It can read the disks from my old TI99/4 :) That computer dual boots Linux and Win98SE.

I also participate in the BOINC (http://boinc.berkeley.edu/) project and most of the above computers run the BOINC client.

I just rechecked my count, there are indeed 15 operating computers right now, including the Tivo. There's another laptop, but it's buried under some clothes right now and although it works fine, I don't use it.

Can you tell I'm a bachelor :lol:

Frantic Freddie
2007-Jun-08, 04:11 AM
As much as I love to visit Texas (just got back from a trip to San Antone & Port Aransas) you couldn't pay me enough to live there,I've lived too long in the desert,too much humidity just knocks me out.

sarongsong
2007-Jun-08, 04:30 AM
Zeee-ro! Mother Nature has blessed this area (North Coastal San Diego County) with one of the stablest climates anywhere. Right now, ocean conditions produce a fog ('affectionately' known as May gray and June gloom) that burns off in the afternoon or not at all, resulting in 70 degree temperatures without the stultifying high humidity of the Gulf and Great Lakes states.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-08, 08:49 AM
My mother doesn't have air conditioning because she lives in a big old farmhouse-y kind of house that would leak cold air all over the place. She lives in LA, too. Basically, I spent the summers of my childhood sweating and whining.

I sweat and whine here, too; even if I could afford an air conditioner (I can't) or the electricity to run it (I can't), there's no window to put it in that wouldn't let the cat out. Stupid cat. Blessedly, our apartment complex has lots of trees and duck ponds; it's generally 10-15 degrees cooler in my living room than outside in the height of summer.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-08, 01:31 PM
My furnace ran this morning because it was 44F outside. It'll get up to the mid 70s today. We have air conditioning but rarely use it. Even in the worst weeks of summer, we only run it a few hours each day. Temperatures drop 30-40 degrees at night, so when the sun goes down, we open windows. We also sleep in our basement bedroom (a good 8-10 degrees cooler than upstairs) on the hot nights. I doubt if we've topped $50 a month for air conditioning during any of the last 5 summers.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-08, 01:41 PM
It's about 15 degrees down here at the moment, so no air conditioners running here...

Heaters, now, thats another story...

tofu
2007-Jun-08, 02:01 PM
What do you do with all those computers?

*shrug* some people spend their money on cats. I spend mine on computers. I'm certain I have more than 15 in the house, but I don't have any reason to run them all at the same time. I have five laptops, but only one is new enough to be useful. I have an Apple ][ and an Apple IIgs that I haven't turned on in years.

Realistically, what I feel I need to have running all the time is just two machines, a server and a desktop. That's my goal, and I'm almost there. I have a big beefy server that can run several VMs. Those VMs eliminate the need for any other physical server. Right now, I still have one other server running just because I haven't made time to shut it down. Another extra machine that I'm getting rid of is a second desktop machine next to a comfy chair. I know that's rather bourgeois, so I'm replacing that one with a Wyse terminal that will remote desktop to a VM.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-08, 02:16 PM
Best estimate is about $100* per month over the warmest 3 months (June/July/August). It is barely used outside of those 3 months, but it is pretty miserable without it when the temps get into the 80's.

We live in a turn of the century farmhouse (beginning of last century, not this one). Though all of it's systems have been upgraded, it still has the typical farmhouse-on-an-open-knob. On warm sunny days when there is little or no breeze to use for cooling, the late afternoon sun gets the upper level cooking - and that is where we sleep. In fact, we usually close all the downstairs vents.

It is also nice to have during warm weather when the humidity gets up there. And we seem to be having more hot humid days than in the past up here.

*This is a significant savings over past years. 2 summers ago we put in a new high-efficiency furnace and AC system (Carrier's very highest rated units). Our energy bills dropped like a rock as the existing systems were about 30 years old.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-08, 05:38 PM
In fact, we usually close all the downstairs vents.

This may be part of your problem. According to the air conditioning guys I know, closing those vents isn't a good idea. A properly sized air conditioning unit needs all of those vents open to ensure adequate airflow. Closing the vents can make the air conditioner less efficient and even lead to freeze ups.

ToSeek
2007-Jun-08, 06:41 PM
I've also noticed that living without A/C seems to make the summers feel less hot overall. Presumably because my body quits whining and gets used to the heat, making me able to actually go outside and enjoy myself during the summer.

I think there's a lot of truth to adaptation. Unfortunately, during my career I've either worked in a computer lab or an office, both of which tend to be cooled to a fair-thee-well. So I tend to come home and want to turn on the ac to alleviate conditions my wife has been dealing with for most of the day.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-08, 06:43 PM
In fact, we usually close all the downstairs vents.

This may be part of your problem. According to the air conditioning guys I know, closing those vents isn't a good idea. A properly sized air conditioning unit needs all of those vents open to ensure adequate airflow. Closing the vents can make the air conditioner less efficient and even lead to freeze ups.

Hmmmmm. So why do they make the vents closeable? And freeze up is what I'm after, as in freeze up stairs.

But seriously, appreciate the advice. I'll give a call to my dealer.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-08, 06:49 PM
I think there's a lot of truth to adaptation. Unfortunately, during my career I've either worked in a computer lab or an office, both of which tend to be cooled to a fair-thee-well. So I tend to come home and want to turn on the ac to alleviate conditions my wife has been dealing with for most of the day.

Ha! Reminds me of our first summer on the farm. Honey was 7 or 8 months pregnant, and the weather was quite warm, and the old system of course went on the fritz. After putzing with it to no avail, I called for service. As I'm describing the symptoms the lady says something about the technician probably getting to us in a couple days or so, unless it was an emergency. I told her my wife is 8 months along, and not gonna want to hear that. She laughed and put it at the top of the list. The guy showed up in minutes, and we laughed again. Apparently they know that situation and recognized the peril I was in.

Larry Jacks
2007-Jun-08, 07:52 PM
Hmmmmm. So why do they make the vents closeable? And freeze up is what I'm after, as in freeze up stairs.

It isn't a problem to close the vents in unused rooms during heating season. I do it every year. The freeze up I'm referring to is the condensor in the air conditioning unit. Having that freeze isn't a good thing, or so I'm told.

Lianachan
2007-Jun-08, 08:53 PM
I spend nothing on air conditioning :)

If it gets too hot, a few open windows encourage enough circulating air. But then, I enjoy the advantages of living in the middle of nowhere.

(I do spend considerably more on heating through the winter)

Donnie B.
2007-Jun-08, 11:09 PM
My electric bill goes up in the summer, but not because of air conditioning (mostly). It's to run the pool filter pump, and even that only runs about ten hours a day most of the season.

I do have a small window air conditioner (not central air) in my bedroom that I run during the night on the hottest nights. I don't enjoy sleeping in hot steamy weather. It never bothered me when I was younger, but I finally gave in and got the window unit a few years ago.

Gillian, cats can't get out a window that has a properly-installed air conditioner in it. But that knowledge won't help you with the other issues you mentioned.

Delvo
2007-Jun-09, 01:11 AM
If window AC units are a problem, consider a mini-split system, also known as a ductless system. It's about the size of a window unit or slightly bigger, but split in half: it has the compressor outside and evaporator(s) inside, connected by a 3" refrigerant tube instead of a much larger air duct as in central air conditioners (in which the evaoprator is outside with the compressor). So it can be installed in buildings where central systems would not be possible or would cost too much, and is just about as quiet as them because the compressor is the main noise source in any AC and is outside, and doesn't need any more than a 3" hole through the wall instead of one the size of an air duct or window.

They've been popular in some European and Oriental countries for a while because of the larger supply of old buildings that can't have air duct networks retrofitted (or at least not at a sensible cost or without unacceptable damage), but are becoming somewhat more common in the USA now. The main manufacturer of them here is Mitsubishi (http://mrslim.com/), but you can find others with a web search.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-09, 03:46 AM
Gillian, cats can't get out a window that has a properly-installed air conditioner in it. But that knowledge won't help you with the other issues you mentioned.

The apartment has two windows. One is a picture window that happens to open, and one is a smaller window, one I'm not sure an air conditioner will fit into, that happens to be right over the cat's box and is therefore a windowsill that he sits on a lot. (Actually, the air conditioner would fit into it if the whole window opened, which it doesn't.)

If my federal disability gets approved (my hearing should be pretty soon; my newest psych eval is next week), I'll have enough so I can afford a swamp cooler, which is certainly better than nothing.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-09, 08:12 AM
The apartment has two windows. One is a picture window that happens to open, and one is a smaller window, one I'm not sure an air conditioner will fit into, that happens to be right over the cat's box and is therefore a windowsill that he sits on a lot. (Actually, the air conditioner would fit into it if the whole window opened, which it doesn't.)

If my federal disability gets approved (my hearing should be pretty soon; my newest psych eval is next week), I'll have enough so I can afford a swamp cooler, which is certainly better than nothing.

swamp coolers work best in places where there is little humidity.

the reason is there is a pool of water at a lower temperature than the air in your house. A fan blows air over the water which takes on the humidity and at the same time lowering the temperature of said air.

Water has a natural vapor pressure, so when the air takes the humidity away more water evaporates into the air above the pool. Then the fan blows it into the house.


In a place with high humidity; and I'm just supposing Olympia is a place of high humidity because I've been there, the humidity in the air is greater than the vapor pressure of water. So any air you blow into the house would not absorb much of the cooler vapor from the pool of water - thus it would not cool, and you'd be blowing the warm air from outside into your house.

my assumption may be wrong, but I remember the Seattle area to be kinda wet.

another potential problem is that this works most often on the first floor as you need a pool of water in the shade - and the water needs to be cooler than the surrounding air (preferably much cooler) thus you should have it in a hole in the dirt.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-09, 09:07 AM
my assumption may be wrong, but I remember the Seattle area to be kinda wet.

Well, about thirty-five miles away, give or take, we have one of the world's only temperate rain forests. So yeah, a little wet.

Last summer, a friend of mine had a portable air conditioner that seemed to me to work on a swamp cooler-type principle. It cooled down her (second story, full sun) bedroom nicely. Of course, it wasn't strong enough to cool their whole apartment, and they ended up sticking it in the ferret room every now and again (ferrets and heat are a bad combination), but I wouldn't mind having one myself for the maybe five days a year we need one in my apartment.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-09, 12:07 PM
here is a link a found (http://www.wonderquest.com/swamp-coolers.htm)


In high humidity areas, like Washington D.C., they don't work at all because the water does not evaporate appreciably and thus the air is not cooled.

anything you ever wanted to know about swamp coolers

http://homegarden.expertvillage.com/interviews/swamp-cooler.htm



Turns out I was mistaken. In olden days they blew water over a 'pool', but now-a-days they blow air through a sponge like material that has a water pump to keep the water supply going and then also a big fan.

Hope this helps.

Frantic Freddie
2007-Jun-09, 01:55 PM
I cool my house with a swamp cooler since I'm in the southwest & I can tell you that they don't work in humid climates.The hotter & drier the air,the better they work.On our rare rainy days when the humidity's up we turn off the pump & just use the fan because otherwise all it does is push warm,soggy air around.

Delvo
2007-Jun-09, 04:05 PM
So these things that don't work in humid places are called "swamp" coolers because...

crosscountry
2007-Jun-09, 05:59 PM
did you read anything I wrote?

TriangleMan
2007-Jun-10, 07:58 AM
Ironically my electricity bill is covered by my rent so I have no idea how much it costs to keep the A/C running (for 7-8 months of the year).

Pleiades
2007-Jun-10, 09:06 AM
Zeee-ro! Mother Nature has blessed this area (North Coastal San Diego County) with one of the stablest climates anywhere. Right now, ocean conditions produce a fog ('affectionately' known as May gray and June gloom) that burns off in the afternoon or not at all, resulting in 70 degree temperatures without the stultifying high humidity of the Gulf and Great Lakes states.

We have a similar situation in the SF bayarea. Mainly on the coast and the SFBay we have a natural air conditioner. We rarely see 85 F (30C) in the Summer, we might see that in the Fall. Its usually 65 -70 F (18 -21C) As Mark Twain is attributed to saying, " The coldest winter was a summer in San Francisco." We definitely like it that way! Therefore most folks that live along the water don't have air conditioning in those old victorian houses.:lol:

m1omg
2007-Jun-10, 09:48 AM
We have an sufficiently insulated house, fortunately, because the temperatures are now much higher than in the past 'cos of GW.....I understand USA don't belive that GW is human caused because it doesn't experience that temp. changes....right now there is temperature 40 degress Celsius and 33 degress in the shade....In one Slovak town on the north called Púchov, people seeded smaller palm trees in the pedestrian zone...
30 years ago, there was cold even in the summer....And pls dont blame it on Sun. the Sun is fairly stable otherwise we will not be there, in fact, it is in its minimum. And volcanos emit only 1/50 of the humans greenhouse gases and a lot of dust, in fact, when the Krakatoa erupted there were colder summers worldwide.USA, please sign Kyoto protocol...

I am living in the southwest Slovakia town called Šaľa and it is very hot here right now, fortunately, we have a swimming pool in the garden :)

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-11, 07:39 AM
I spend nothing on air conditioning :)

If it gets too hot, a few open windows encourage enough circulating air. But then, I enjoy the advantages of living in the middle of nowhere.

(I do spend considerably more on heating through the winter)

yeah but in scotland people start collapsing in the street when it hits 25, they don't know what hot is up there

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-11, 07:45 AM
Well, about thirty-five miles away, give or take, we have one of the world's only temperate rain forests. So yeah, a little wet.

Last summer, a friend of mine had a portable air conditioner that seemed to me to work on a swamp cooler-type principle. It cooled down her (second story, full sun) bedroom nicely. Of course, it wasn't strong enough to cool their whole apartment, and they ended up sticking it in the ferret room every now and again (ferrets and heat are a bad combination), but I wouldn't mind having one myself for the maybe five days a year we need one in my apartment.

Surely you jest...

At least 10% of Victoria is temperate Rainforest


Anyhoo, back on topic

We got a new evaporative cooling system a year or two back, and i don't know about savings, but it certainly works a lot more efficiently and quietly than the old clunker we used to have, plus it actualy cools the whole house, not just one area

Much more pleasant (and astheticaly(sp?) pleasing) overall

3rdvogon
2007-Jun-11, 10:38 AM
Aircon within the home may still be the exception rather than the rule in the UK but that is changing.

Back in the early 1990s I wanted something to make the summer months in my "south facing" bedroom more tolerable. I had tried fans but found them of little benefit but they were easy to buy in most places. If however you wanted aircon at home it seemed you had to call for professional installation and all the expense that entailed.

That has now all changed almost every electric appliance or home improvement store will have at least 2 models of "portable" aircon units for sale with models varying between the 8,000 to 15,000 btu range. These are all the single units you wheel about and poke the exhaust duct through a vent or partially opened window.

I currently own the model illustrated below

http://www.comet.co.uk/comet/dyn_imgs/prods/prod_large/311626.jpg

This is not intended as a commercial and I have no connection with either the manufarturer or retailer but I can say I find it a very useful addition to the home even if at only 10,000 btu it is only really capable of cooling a couple of fairly large rooms. It does however provide a nice refuge at home when things are getting a bit uncomfortable outside. We many not get the heat here that comes with some climates but when it does get warm in the UK it is nearly always very humid also. With a device like this I can keep my bedroom to a comfortable 65F even when outside it is well into the 80sF. Even though I probably only use it for 3 months of the year I would rather not have to do without it.

If you want to get a feel what things like that cost in this country then check the link below.
http://www.comet.co.uk/cometbrowse/category.do?categoryId=93

Click Ticker
2007-Jun-11, 12:50 PM
We finally caved in and got central air when our third child was due. We run it a couple days here and there in May and June. Run it most frequently in July and August, then we're back on the as needed plan in September. Our electric bill never rose much more than $40 above normal even when running constantly.

We have a Ruud, and it is far less expensive to run than what I expected. Our house was built in 2003 and has 60 plus ft tall Maples in the back woods and a huge mature oak on the southwest corner. The house faces east and the south side gets the most sun. The only windows on that side are under a covered patio. Another stand of tall trees are behind the houses accross the street as well. This gets us in shad a couple hours before sunset in the summers.

tofu
2007-Jun-11, 09:13 PM
I can keep my bedroom to a comfortable 65F even when outside it is well into the 80sF.

wowzers. My thermostat is set to 79F when I'm at home. I would freeze to death at 65F.

Anyone else here like to cool their house to 65?

Gillianren
2007-Jun-11, 11:05 PM
Surely you jest...

At least 10% of Victoria is temperate Rainforest

Well, I did say "one of the only," not "the only." It's all considered one forest, just as the one here is. (There's one in Chile, too, I believe. And that's pretty much it.)

crosscountry
2007-Jun-11, 11:08 PM
I sleep best between 70 and 75. my favorite days are high of 82-85. Living in Texas that is sometimes early, sometimes late spring and fall.

DOOMMaster
2007-Jun-12, 12:31 AM
Man, must be nice to not be able to run the A/C. Personally, my allergies don't let me do that. Once it starts getting into the summertime, my hayfever starts bothering me. No way I'd suffer through that, I don't care how much A/C costs. I also can't sleep in the humidity and I'm not going to lose sleep. Central IL is pretty much nothing but humid from June to September, which is pretty much when allergy season ends for me too.

As for the cost, my electrical bill went up about $50-$75 dollars compared to non-A/C months. With the raised electrical prices this year, I'm not sure yet, but it'll probably be $100-$150. But that's a small price to pay for the ability to sleep at night in my opinion.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 03:37 AM
You poor things. It was about 60 today when I went out for my psych appointment, and I was half-wishing I'd worn shorts. It was lovely out--cool and cloudy, just the way I like it.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-12, 04:11 AM
You poor things. It was about 60 today when I went out for my psych appointment, and I was half-wishing I'd worn shorts. It was lovely out--cool and cloudy, just the way I like it.

The 110F temps aren't here YET. Today, it was only 80F, cloudy and rainy. But our normal highs this time of year are 97-103 and down to 62-63 at night. It's Phoenix and Yuma that make Tucson seem chilly. :)

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-12, 04:55 AM
Well, I did say "one of the only," not "the only." It's all considered one forest, just as the one here is. (There's one in Chile, too, I believe. And that's pretty much it.)

Ok, but "it's all considered one forest" makes no sense to me, as, for example, the erinundra (sp?) plateau is around 600 km away from the Otway range, one of our other main temperate rainforests

TriangleMan
2007-Jun-12, 05:06 AM
The 110F temps aren't here YET. Today, it was only 80F, cloudy and rainy. But our normal highs this time of year are 97-103 and down to 62-63 at night.
For the last few weeks here it has been hitting 105-109F but due to the damned humidity it rarely drops below 90F at night. I don't know how anyone managed to live in this region without A/C.

Ahhhhhhhh, A/C :cool:

Kelfazin
2007-Jun-12, 05:12 AM
The 110F temps aren't here YET. Today, it was only 80F, cloudy and rainy. But our normal highs this time of year are 97-103 and down to 62-63 at night. It's Phoenix and Yuma that make Tucson seem chilly. :)

As a Phoenix resident I can vouch for that :) We had a fairly mild spring here so I've only been running the AC since the end of March. I keep my house at about 78 and run some fans to keep the air circulating better. In the fall and spring when I'm not running AC or Heat my bills average about $50 and in the summer they go up to about $260. My house is 2 story and the thermostat is upstairs which makes the AC run a lot more often then I would like it to, but it's not to bad. As for the $450 quoted in the OP, I've never heard of an AC bill that high.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 05:21 AM
Ok, but "it's all considered one forest" makes no sense to me, as, for example, the erinundra (sp?) plateau is around 600 km away from the Otway range, one of our other main temperate rainforests

Hey, maybe our visitors' center has it wrong; I'm willing to admit that. Still, even if it is two separate forests, that's still four worldwide, which is pretty exclusive as far as type of forest goes.

In the days since I've moved here, I've gotten way more sensitive to heat. I could never move back to LA again. Back in high school, I whined every time it hit 85 or so. Here, I start whining at about 75.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-12, 05:38 AM
Hey, maybe our visitors' center has it wrong; I'm willing to admit that. Still, even if it is two separate forests, that's still four worldwide, which is pretty exclusive as far as type of forest goes.

True enough, there isn't many


In the days since I've moved here, I've gotten way more sensitive to heat. I could never move back to LA again. Back in high school, I whined every time it hit 85 or so. Here, I start whining at about 75.

75 farenheit is lower than our AVERAGE temperature in summer

Heck, i remember one day it reached 46.7 degrees here (about 116 degrees, pretty damn hot for a moderate rainfall coastal area at 39 degrees south) about four years ago, now THAT was hot, i'm used to getting several 38 (100) degree days every summer, but that was something else, very uncomfortable

3rdvogon
2007-Jun-12, 08:42 AM
wowzers. My thermostat is set to 79F when I'm at home. I would freeze to death at 65F.

Anyone else here like to cool their house to 65?

Nonsense - 65F is optimum - at 79F I would be sweating like a pig (especially in the humidity in UK). At 65 you can sit around comfortably in a T shirt and know that you will not break-out it a sweat just pushing the vacuum around. I would like a house that maintained a constant 65F indoor temp summer and winter. Also at 65 you can sleep under a duvet without cooking. At anything above 80F I need to have a fan blowing full on my face to stop the sweat running down the lenses of my glasses. When the air temp reaches 80F there is only one logical place to be and that is under water. Mind you as the sea around here rarely gets above the low 50sF I tend to stay out of it - I may like to be cool but not that cool.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-12, 08:49 AM
As a Phoenix resident I can vouch for that :) We had a fairly mild spring here so I've only been running the AC since the end of March. I keep my house at about 78 and run some fans to keep the air circulating better. In the fall and spring when I'm not running AC or Heat my bills average about $50 and in the summer they go up to about $260. My house is 2 story and the thermostat is upstairs which makes the AC run a lot more often then I would like it to, but it's not to bad. As for the $450 quoted in the OP, I've never heard of an AC bill that high.



here is what he said


name deleted wrote:
We are supposed to have about a week of high 90's coming up.

Both of my Units will be running full tilt trying to attain 76 deg.

My bill will be 470 next billing. I have level billing too....450.00 every (bad word deleted) month. :wink;

his house is 2900 square feet or 270 Square meters

tofu
2007-Jun-12, 02:49 PM
Nonsense - 65F is optimum - at 79F I would be sweating like a pig (especially in the humidity in UK).

I just can't understand that.

It reminds me of a funny story though. The first time I stayed in a hotel in Korea, I stepped into the room and felt like I was in Alaska. I looked at the thermostat and found it set to 20. "Twenty degrees?? This must be some sort of mistake," I said to myself as I turned it *way* up.

Then I went out for dinner. I returned later to find that I would be sleeping in a fiery pit of hell that evening.

Typical American thing to do, I suppose.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-12, 03:11 PM
As a Phoenix resident I can vouch for that :) We had a fairly mild spring here so I've only been running the AC since the end of March. I keep my house at about 78 and run some fans to keep the air circulating better. In the fall and spring when I'm not running AC or Heat my bills average about $50 and in the summer they go up to about $260. My house is 2 story and the thermostat is upstairs which makes the AC run a lot more often then I would like it to, but it's not to bad. As for the $450 quoted in the OP, I've never heard of an AC bill that high.

Yes. I've never had a summer-time electric bill over $250 and our house is 2200 square feet and all electric. Winter bills hover around $120.

Kelfazin
2007-Jun-12, 05:56 PM
his house is 2900 square feet or 270 Square meters

I guess I could see a bill that high if he's running 2 AC units. And maybe the cost of electricity is higher in his area than mine. Just seems high to me is all :)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 09:03 PM
I just can't understand that.

You can always put on more clothes. There's a limit to how much you can take off--once you're down to skin, you're stuck. (Especially if you're on vinyl furniture. Yeowch!)

crosscountry
2007-Jun-12, 10:28 PM
take a cold shower. hot is not painful while cold is.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-12, 10:57 PM
wowzers. My thermostat is set to 79F when I'm at home. I would freeze to death at 65F.

Anyone else here like to cool their house to 65?

Too cold. Heated to 68F in the winter, cooled to 76F in the summer. You feel cooler with lower humidity and activity. So our low humidity while relaxing at night in winter can get a bit chilly. Also, my house tends to stay cool anyway, which is great in the summer but not so great in the winter.

Van Rijn
2007-Jun-12, 11:08 PM
You can always put on more clothes.


At home, I've sometimes put on a heavy outdoor jacket, but it's a bit ridiculous wearing that around the house. In winter, I usually wear warm clothing double or triple layer with double layer heavy socks. When my feet get really cold, it is intensely uncomfortable, and it can take a very long time before they warm up again without external heat (heating pad, hot water, etc.) or some really heavy activity. Socks, blankets, etc. won't do it.

I really hate that.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 11:33 PM
take a cold shower. hot is not painful while cold is.

Hot's painful to me a lot sooner than cold is. Heat makes me physically ill. Hence, I moved out of southern California and to Washington State. I'm a little cold right now; I think my warm blanket got put under the sheet with the padding blankets!