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Dannawht
2007-Jun-13, 03:18 AM
How is everyone doing? Any great plans for summer?
Link removed by Moderator

Josh
2007-Jun-13, 03:30 AM
Hi Dannawht,

Please read the rules (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=564845) before posting and try not to post inappropriate links. I'm hoping that was an oversite on your part and not a spammer. We'll wait and see.

Welcome to the site anyway ...

jrkeller
2007-Jun-13, 04:17 AM
So far with 90 degree days and 90 % humidity, but that's just Houston.

Whirlpool
2007-Jun-13, 04:55 AM
Summer?
My 3 yo son had his first swimming lesson .

But...
It's almost over here in my country , and rainy season is coming.

Actually , it's been raining here the past few days.

;)

ToSeek
2007-Jun-13, 01:28 PM
Established spammer, but I'll leave the thread here since it's started a conversation.

Swift
2007-Jun-13, 03:18 PM
Considering that summer doesn't start for about another week in the Northern Hemisphere, I have no idea how it will treat me.

Ericinho6
2007-Jun-13, 03:33 PM
Summer's been good, went to Florida...and came back to still, hot weather :lol:

Delvo
2007-Jun-13, 05:34 PM
Considering that summer doesn't start for about another week in the Northern Hemisphere, I have no idea how it will treat me.It always bugs me when someone says a season doesn't "officially start" until some arbitrary false date that's been set for it with complete disregard for when the seasons really actually do their thing. The weather ALWAYS enters its new seasonal pattern WEEKS before these people admit what it is. Why don't they just admit that their dates are not the beginnings of the seasons, but in the middle of them (or at best halfway from beginning to middle)? Seasons aren't about angles of imaginary lines between stars; they're about the WEATHER, so why in the world NOT call it what the WEATHER really is, or at least put your fixed arbitrary dates somewhere near the dates when the WEATHER normally actually enters its new phase instead of weeks thereafter?

Swift
2007-Jun-13, 05:42 PM
Originally Posted by Swift
Considering that summer doesn't start for about another week in the Northern Hemisphere, I have no idea how it will treat me.
It always bugs me when someone says a season doesn't "officially start" until some arbitrary false date that's been set for it with complete disregard for when the seasons really actually do their thing. The weather ALWAYS enters its new seasonal pattern WEEKS before these people admit what it is. Why don't they just admit that their dates are not the beginnings of the seasons, but in the middle of them (or at best halfway from beginning to middle)? Seasons aren't about angles of imaginary lines between stars; they're about the WEATHER, so why in the world NOT call it what the WEATHER really is, or at least put your fixed arbitrary dates somewhere near the dates when the WEATHER normally actually enters its new phase instead of weeks thereafter?
You obviously have very strong feelings about this and I don't. But I could counter that argument with the fact that astronomical measurements are not arbitrary, but the weather is (or at least a lot more arbitrary). June 21 is the Summer Solitice in the Northern Hemisphere, the longest day of the year, etc. It is not arbitrary.

By your way of thinking, summer starts in February in Florida and in July in Maine, and that is only in a typical year. Since the weather is different every year, do you change when the season starts? :confused:

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-13, 05:56 PM
You obviously have very strong feelings about this and I don't. But I could counter that argument with the fact that astronomical measurements are not arbitrary, but the weather is (or at least a lot more arbitrary). June 21 is the Summer Solitice in the Northern Hemisphere, the longest day of the year, etc. It is not arbitrary.

By your way of thinking, summer starts in February in Florida and in July in Maine, and that is only in a typical year. Since the weather is different every year, do you change when the season starts? :confused:

Agreed. Where I live "Summer" would start in February and run thru October. :)

Delvo, if things like this "bug" you, then you're in for a very rough life.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-13, 06:50 PM
Since the weather is different every year, do you change when the season starts? :confused:

I say yes. The season is about the weather, and therefore the seasons have a general predictable trend, but defy exacting schedules. I'm OK with that. I'd rather have a general flexibility in declaring summer has arrived, than claim it arrives on the solstice - which does not define seasons at all, has no meteorological significance, and is just an astronomically interesting date.

Summer in Florida starts earlier than summer in Wisconsin. Heck, with a high degree of long term predictability, it even starts earlier in Chicago than it does in Minneapolis.

This of course all hinges on my preference to recognize the seasons as meteorological and not astronomical. I am not nuerotic about it, just a little bit bothered. I'll be fine by fall.

Trebuchet
2007-Jun-13, 07:19 PM
I always figure summer here starts on July 5 and ends August 31. It was really nice here last week, but then the weekend happened.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-13, 07:38 PM
It was awfully bloody hot a couple of weekends last August. Remember, I'm outside during those weekends; I know exactly how hot it is. (Well, how hot it feels. But I may bring a thermometer this year, because I'm that much of a masochist.)

Swift
2007-Jun-14, 02:03 PM
I say yes. The season is about the weather, and therefore the seasons have a general predictable trend, but defy exacting schedules. I'm OK with that. I'd rather have a general flexibility in declaring summer has arrived, than claim it arrives on the solstice - which does not define seasons at all, has no meteorological significance, and is just an astronomically interesting date.

Summer in Florida starts earlier than summer in Wisconsin. Heck, with a high degree of long term predictability, it even starts earlier in Chicago than it does in Minneapolis.

This of course all hinges on my preference to recognize the seasons as meteorological and not astronomical. I am not nuerotic about it, just a little bit bothered. I'll be fine by fall.
So what do you do about a fairly common situation in Cleveland (and probably elsewhere), where we'll have, for example, a couple of very warm days in late winter/early spring, then it will get cold again for a while (we had snow on Easter), then hot, then cool. It could turn into this scene from Holy Grail...

Autumn changed into Winter ... Winter changed into Spring ... Spring
changed back into Autumn and Autumn gave Winter and Spring a miss and went straight on into Summer ... ;)

Moose
2007-Jun-14, 02:52 PM
Oh, exactly. About ten years ago, we had a Valentine's Day where the temp in Halifax was 24C (75F). It was typical summer weather, not mid-winter. Halifax weather has been stuck on "variable" since Confederation, but this was exceptional if not totally unique in my experience.

We (Northern NB) had a similarly warm day, 35C (95F), in early March this year.

Both days were firmly in the Winter seasons, because Winter is typical of our weather.

As far as I know, the southern Hemisphere has their Winter (Dec 21st - Mar 21st) during the same period of time as the rest of us, yet they get their warm season when we get our cold one.

The seasons really have nothing to do with the weather. We merely associate expected weather to the seasons.

Captain Kidd
2007-Jun-14, 02:55 PM
This is why we in Tennessee have multiple winters and summers, saves the hassle of sticking to just one season per year. :) Dogwood Winter, Blackberry Winter, Indian Summer, etc.

The "winters" are usually identified by what's blooming at the time. It'll be a high of 80F one day and overnight a cold snap will hit and we'll have a high of 40F for a couple days and then back to 70F the following day. That'll stick around for a week, and then we'll have another cold snap with freezing temps at night, and maybe during the day too. That'll last 3-4 days and then it'll hit the high 80s.

You never know what to wear around here during spring and fall. 30F when I leave for work and 80F when I got off.

Moose
2007-Jun-14, 03:05 PM
The "winters" are usually identified by what's blooming at the time.

It's always so lovely seeing the Indians bloom in late September. ;)

R.A.F.
2007-Jun-14, 03:07 PM
Lets see...yesterday was the first day we "had" to use the air cooler. Last year we started using it in April.

So, so far, so good. :)

Captain Kidd
2007-Jun-14, 03:09 PM
It's always so lovely seeing the Indians bloom in late September. ;)Re-read my post, that's Indian Summer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_summer). ;)

Moose
2007-Jun-14, 03:13 PM
Heh, I even quoted it, but didn't see the word "winters" there. Ah well. Still funny in my mind. You can't take that away from me. :p Nyah!

Captain Kidd
2007-Jun-14, 03:14 PM
Heh. No, I can't. :D

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-14, 03:41 PM
Oh, exactly. About ten years ago, we had a Valentine's Day where the temp in Halifax was 24C (75F). It was typical summer weather, not mid-winter. Halifax weather has been stuck on "variable" since Confederation, but this was exceptional if not totally unique in my experience.

We (Northern NB) had a similarly warm day, 35C (95F), in early March this year.

Both days were firmly in the Winter seasons, because Winter is typical of our weather.

As far as I know, the southern Hemisphere has their Winter (Dec 21st - Mar 21st) during the same period of time as the rest of us, yet they get their warm season when we get our cold one.

The seasons really have nothing to do with the weather. We merely associate expected weather to the seasons.

From my physical science studies in meteorology, the weather IS what defines the seasons; a much stronger relationship than a mere association. True, those weather changes are caused by the Earth's inclined axis, but primarily because of the diurnal heat lag, and secondarily because of the chaotic nature of weather systems; the seasons do not line up with, and are not defined by solstices and equinoxes. They are defined by the weather.

Seasons are also not defined or violated by a day or 2 (or even a few in a row) that are not typical or average for the season.

Some support of this is found in the fact that many tropical areas do not even define their seasons as spring, summer, fall and winter (SSFW). They are labeled rainy and dry. These are areas where daily temperature range (average high and low for any given day) varies by more than seasonal temperature range (average high or low of any 2 days of the year). In areas like that the typical season labels are relatively meaningless.

Also, the seasons are reversed in the 2 different hemispheres (north and south). Along most of the equator there is only the wet season and the dry season - no SSFW. North and south of that the seasons are reversed. The warm season is the summer, and the cold season is the winter. Support for this can be seen in the climate classification systems. The categories are not reversed for one hemisphere or the other. The temperature ranges that define the categories for things like cool summer/mild winter are the same for each hemisphere. When the north is having winter, the south is having summer, and vice versa. It would be very hemishpere-centric to label the north's warm season as summer and the south's warm season as winter.

farmerjumperdon
2007-Jun-14, 04:02 PM
Here is the Wiki link to Koeppen, which provides a lot of great info on climate and seasons. Notice that for Tropical Rain Forest, the areas that are year round wet, and therefore have no dry season, and that also have almost no variance in daily average temperatures throughout the year are indicated as having no seasons. No weather variance = no seasons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%B6ppen_climate_classification

(Forgot the clicky thingy).

Argos
2007-Jun-14, 04:48 PM
As far as I know, the southern Hemisphere has their Winter (Dec 21st - Mar 21st) during the same period of time as the rest of us, yet they get their warm season when we get our cold one.

No, thatīs summer. Winter here starts on the 21st of June. In tropical regions of the southern hemisphere, as in Northern Brazil, people call the wet season [november to march] "winter", and it corresponds to the Northern hemisphere winter. But it is not true for latitudes above 20 deg.

By the way, weīre having a veritable 'avant-premiere' of winter. The first snowfall of the year happened two weeks ago in southern Brazil.

Moose
2007-Jun-14, 04:52 PM
No, thatīs summer. Winter here starts on the 21st of June.

Huh. Okay. I guess I'm convinced, then.

Argos
2007-Jun-14, 04:59 PM
I guess I didn´t understand your point...

Swift
2007-Jun-15, 01:26 PM
It's always so lovely seeing the Indians bloom in late September. ;)
Yes, particularly if they make the playoffs. GO TRIBE (http://cleveland.indians.mlb.com/index.jsp?c_id=cle)!!!

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-15, 02:51 PM
Considering that summer doesn't start for about another week in the Northern Hemisphere, I have no idea how it will treat me.

you posted that on the 14th of June.

Your summer started over two weeks ago according to the way it works here

Swift
2007-Jun-15, 03:04 PM
you posted that on the 14th of June.

Your summer started over two weeks ago according to the way it works here
My understanding, from past BAUT discussions, is that Europe works the same way, "summer" is June, July, August, "autumn" is September, October, November, etc.
The opinions about astronomical definition versus weather definition are well discussed above. I think I've given my opinion about the weather definition.

In the US, there is also the variant that defines summer as Memorial Day to Labor Day, which this year would be May 28 to September 3. There are no similar definitions for the other three seasons.

The park system I volunteer with publishes quarterly schedules of their programs. They used to literally do quarters (January-February-March was the first quarter), but this past year went to "seasonal", so that Winter was December-January-February. People seem to like that more and it does jive better with how outdoor activities go around here.

As a practical system, I like the European/Australian system, but the astronomical one is the technically correct one, IMHO.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-15, 03:08 PM
My understanding, from past BAUT discussions, is that Europe works the same way, "summer" is June, July, August, "autumn" is September, October, November, etc.
The opinions about astronomical definition versus weather definition are well discussed above. I think I've given my opinion about the weather definition.

In the US, there is also the variant that defines summer as Memorial Day to Labor Day, which this year would be May 28 to September 3. There are no similar definitions for the other three seasons.

The park system I volunteer with publishes quarterly schedules of their programs. They used to literally do quarters (January-February-March was the first quarter), but this past year went to "seasonal", so that Winter was December-January-February. People seem to like that more and it does jive better with how outdoor activities go around here.

As a practical system, I like the European/Australian system, but the astronomical one is the technically correct one, IMHO.

So true

Interestingly, if we went on weather patterns ours would normally be January - March

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-16, 07:44 PM
Hmm, there seems to be a lot of passion on this topic.

I reckon that it's all down to what you're used to.

Traditionally, in Europe, the solstices and equinoxes mark the middle of each season. How else would "In the bleak midwinter" make sense as a Christmas carol?

That way, you can define the start and end of each season by the weather. My own personal experience is that, typically, June - August are summery, September - November are autumny, December - February are wintry and March - May are ... erm ... springy. But this is a rough guide and not a hard and fast rule. In Britain, we'll often say things like "winter has come early" or whatever.

Any road-up, this week has been very very wet for us and unseasonably cold. Yesterday, it was only 10° when I was driving home from work. We've had about 6 days of fairly heavy rain, and there is flooding in parts of Yorkshire. I believe some rivers have burst their banks in other parts of the country too.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-17, 07:16 PM
How's my summer been treating me: Lousy.

Friggin' lousy.


And it hasn't even really gotten started yet.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-17, 07:23 PM
Hot. The southern AZ summer heat has set in. From now till the summer rainy season starts (in about three weeks) we have our REAL hot days. It's been 103F-105F each day and we'll probably see 110+ before the rain starts. But at least for now, the humidity is low (8-12%) and the nights cool off to upper 60s. After the rainy season starts we get humidity. :sad:

But at least I don't live in Phoenix or Yuma! (Just to see if any of those folks are reading this :) )

Knowledge_Seeker
2007-Jun-17, 07:36 PM
I'm so bored. And hot. And have a lot of freetime. And I'm bored.

Lianachan
2007-Jun-17, 08:05 PM
Like it caught me sleeping with its wife.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-17, 08:19 PM
I need a vacation...BADLY!

I'll try to take a few weeks off in July, but work is pretty busy right now.
At least it isn't too hot here--mainly in the mid-70's to mid-80's--and not humid.

Delvo
2007-Jun-17, 09:07 PM
Many of the hills around here that are usually green at this time of year have large depressing brown spots. It could be because spring was drier than usual, but I didn't think it was THAT much so...

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-17, 09:13 PM
Many of the hills around here that are usually green at this time of year have large depressing brown spots. It could be because spring was drier than usual, but I didn't think it was THAT much so...

Don't know where you are, but it has been raining plenty around here. The Midwest has cicadas, I believe!

Maksutov
2007-Jun-18, 12:46 AM
I despise spring.

I abhor summer.

Just four more days here in the Northern Hemisphere until the daytime mercifully starts getting shorter again.

The FALL-AUTUMN!

Ahh!

The greatest time of year.

Followed by magnificent WINTER:

Let the cold infest.
The chill that sorts out the rest.
Winter is the best.

Gillianren
2007-Jun-18, 05:27 AM
Amen, Brother Mak, amen. We haven't hit our hottest days yet, of course, but the temperature's been in the 60s a lot lately, and I, for one, am thrilled about it.

I don't know where you are, Delvo, but I heard on the Weather Channel this morning that LA is having a possible record-breaking dry year.

Swift
2007-Jun-18, 01:39 PM
I would say spring, particularly early sping, is my favorite time. I love when things just start to green up, the spring wildflowers, my amphib friends wake from their winter naps, and the weather is cool and wonderful.

After that, I would say I like fall (particularly early October) and winter. I hate summer, other than the long hours of daylight. I get migraines from the heat, and so summer is a constant struggle.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-18, 01:51 PM
My favorite is fall, especially New England fall, with all the leaves turning.

Not hot, not cold enough to keep me indoors.

Damien Evans
2007-Jun-18, 02:58 PM
My favourite is Autumn, and so far this winter is driving me crazy cause it's freezing (almost literally) down here

Gillianren
2007-Jun-18, 07:00 PM
I like the change in seasons. I prefer autumn, though, because it's changing away from the blasted heat.

Fazor
2007-Jun-18, 08:24 PM
I like the change in seasons. I prefer autumn, though, because it's changing away from the blasted heat.

Yes, but it's changing TOWARD the infernal cold! Argh! I do love Autumn though, just wish it could stay Autumn. Great fishing. Great for baseball/football. Nice crisp clean air. Wonderfull.

Click Ticker
2007-Jun-18, 08:51 PM
I tend to think of summer as the time of year the kids are out of school and most people take their family vacations. Of course, that's coming from the perspective of one who has children. Memorial Day - Labor Day is the most fair description, in my opinion of course.

So far - so good.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-18, 09:01 PM
I used to hate summer. Now, it is the only time of year I can go outside and not freeze my butt off. I feel cold at temps below 78F.

I used to be more sensitive to heat, but age and a slowing metabolism have gotten the best of me.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-18, 09:15 PM
I used to be more sensitive to heat, but age and a slowing metabolism have gotten the best of me.

I wish my metabolism was so slow that I could only run 12-18 miles a day! :)

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-18, 09:32 PM
Well, I used to be able to maintain weight while being a couch potato ;); I didn't start exercising like this until I hit 30! I used to be able to eat whatever I wanted until this January.

Now, I have to watch it a bit. Ugh. Getting old may suck, but it beats the alternative!

BTW, Hubby saw my remark on the 'Confronting' thread RE my heel pain and got really ticked at me for not saying anything to him about it. He is the running shoe expert in the family; he is on me now to buy a new pair, as he thinks the old ones have bitten the dust.

I think the old ones are fine. They may smell a bit (ok, a LOT), but there aren't any holes in the sole yet. There are holes in the upper part, but that's okay. Holes in the sole would be the only grounds for chucking the pair.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-18, 09:37 PM
I think the old ones are fine.

The cushioning material between your foot and the pavement is what breaks down. Serious runners (and you qualify) should replace their running shoes at least every six months or so. Even at $100+ per pair it is a cheap investment.

Dr Nigel
2007-Jun-18, 09:47 PM
Yeah, what Tucson Tim said. You only ever get one set of knees, Achilles' tendons and shins - and you can't replace them with good-as-new when they fail.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-18, 09:53 PM
Sigh.

Yeah, I'm getting a new pair this week. There is a Pacers right near my metro stop, which makes it convenient to do after work.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-18, 10:13 PM
Running/jogging is one of the cheapest and easiest forms of exercise - the only item of clothing that you need to spend good money on is shoes. BTW, when I say 'easiest' I mean that it can be done almost anywhere. No need to drive to an exercise club - just walk out your door and go. But it can be hard on the body and some folks can't tolerate the pounding.

Delvo
2007-Jun-19, 02:04 AM
...infernal cold!:lol::rolleyes::razz::naughty::eh::D

Gillianren
2007-Jun-19, 03:35 AM
Yeah, what Tucson Tim said. You only ever get one set of knees, Achilles' tendons and shins - and you can't replace them with good-as-new when they fail.

Take my word for it--having bad knees is no fun. I miss those days when I could walk a couple of miles--indeed, farther than a couple of blocks.