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View Full Version : Spam scams get ever sleazier



ToSeek
2007-Jun-15, 01:37 AM
Just got this today:


FROM: SGT.DAVID SMITH FITTE,
Important Message



Good day my Dear,
I am SGT.DAVID SMITH FITTE, an American Soldier. I am serving in the US
Army of D Company, 2nd Battalion 22nd,Infantary Regiment, Iraq.

As you know we are being attacked by insurgents everyday and car
bombs.I and my crew members discovered $650M USD in Saddam Hussein's palace
in April 2003. We now managed to move away a total sum of US$25 Million
dollars cash out from the $650MUSD, mostly 100-dollar bills and was
quickly flown out of the warzone and deposited in an undisclosed security
company in Europe. You can as well click on the site for more details
about the funds.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/2988455.stm

Unfortunately, the rest of my crew members have lost dear lives to the
wicked Iraqi insurgents.I therefore seek your partnership to assist me
transfer these funds into your account and invest the funds without
further delay.

If you are interested I will send you the full details but my fear is
Can I trust you? When you receive this letter, kindly send me an e-mail:
signifying your interest including your most confidential telephone/fax
numbers in order to forward to the Security company for the release of
the funds in your names or your company. This business is risk free.

Respectfully,
DAVID SMITH FITTE, [SGT]

Doctor Know
2007-Jun-15, 01:55 AM
Sargeant Smith is serving in the 22nd Infantary Regiment? I knew we were recruiting 'em younger and younger every day, but I had no idea...:lol:

So they were able to get the money to a security company in Europe, but can't get it no further without your kind help. Why that doesn't set alarm bells off in even the dimmest recipent's heads I can't imagine.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-15, 01:58 AM
"DEAR SGT. SMITH FITTE:

I am sending, directly to you, a good swift kick in the (deleted OO)

Sincerely, etc."

Torsten
2007-Jun-15, 03:03 AM
Hmmmm. A variation on the Nigeria 419 scam?

A know a fellow who fell for a version of that scam based on fictitious events in Benin. No amount of telling him that it was the Nigeria 419 scam in different garb convinced him. I dread to ask how much he lost.

There is something about the thought of obtaining outrageous riches that closes some minds to all reasonable arguments. And the con artists know it, and take advantage of it. Sad, really.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-15, 03:06 AM
There is something about the thought of obtaining outrageous riches that closes some minds to all reasonable arguments. And the con artists know it, and take advantage of it. Sad, really.

It's called greed. And, to steal a quote from the movie Wall Street, "greed is good" for the scammer.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-15, 03:08 AM
It's the old scammer's maxim; "Let the sheep shear themselves."

Jens
2007-Jun-15, 03:13 AM
What always surprises me about those scams is how people who are foolish enough to fall for them managed to get that much money in the first place. I couldn't fall for a scame like that, even if I wanted to. What, you want me to deposit how much? Sorry, don't have it. How about 5 bucks?

And also, I don't think they're getting sleezier. I've gotten messages like that for years, and they've been plenty sleezy from the beginning. Wives of dictators in Africa, dead relatives, etc. Gabriel Garcia Marquez could probably make a brilliant novel out of the stories. . .

Eta C
2007-Jun-15, 03:25 AM
And also, I don't think they're getting sleezier. I've gotten messages like that for years, and they've been plenty sleezy from the beginning. Wives of dictators in Africa, dead relatives, etc. Gabriel Garcia Marquez could probably make a brilliant novel out of the stories. . .

Well, I don't know. The shift of the "author" from an anonomous person in Africa to a U.S. soldier shifts things and adds to the sleaze factor. I can imagine that some people who would reject the appeals from the "dictator's widow" would give the appeal from "the kid next door" a little more credibility (although anyone with half a brain or who knows anything about the web should know about this scam and reject it outright.)

Ah, well. As Twain said "Five percent of the people think, ten percent think they think, and the other eighty five percent would rather die than think." Scams like this only work because of the 85%.

JustAFriend
2007-Jun-15, 04:00 AM
Back in the 60s-70s, the Jack Webb "Dragnet" show used to highlight typical scams pulled by bunco artists in various storylines as a way to warn people.

....the same scams are still being pulled today....

(IMHO: Anyone pulling a scam posing as a member of the military should get a 50-year minimum sentence with ZERO time off for any reason...)

pzkpfw
2007-Jun-15, 05:11 AM
What always surprises me about those scams is how people who are foolish enough to fall for them managed to get that much money in the first place. I couldn't fall for a scame like that, even if I wanted to. What, you want me to deposit how much? Sorry, don't have it. How about 5 bucks?

There have been cases here where people have gotten the money from friends and relatives. They end up losing $100's of thousands of other peoples' money. Generally they have not exactly told these secondary victims where their money was going, just some "great investment".

These secondary victims are still nuts, but just a bit less nuts, as they were fooled by an actual person they knew.

Ronald Brak
2007-Jun-15, 05:47 AM
IMHO: Anyone pulling a scam posing as a member of the military should get a 50-year minimum sentence with ZERO time off for any reason...

Have to be careful with laws like that or you end up jailing a homeless person for 50 years just because they claimed to be a veteran to get a handout. Just being homeless is punishment enough.

crosscountry
2007-Jun-15, 07:52 AM
Well, I don't know. The shift of the "author" from an anonomous person in Africa to a U.S. soldier shifts things and adds to the sleaze factor. I can imagine that some people who would reject the appeals from the "dictator's widow" would give the appeal from "the kid next door" a little more credibility (although anyone with half a brain or who knows anything about the web should know about this scam and reject it outright.)

Ah, well. As Twain said "Five percent of the people think, ten percent think they think, and the other eighty five percent would rather die than think." Scams like this only work because of the 85%.

Mark Twain said that? cool quote.

Stuart van Onselen
2007-Jun-15, 08:21 AM
I've heard of a Harvard professor (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/03/31/harvard_prof_scams/) falling for a 419, and getting his family to give him the money. So even the (supposedly) brightest people can be dumb!

And these schemes can be much sleezier than you might imagine. Sometimes the victims get kidnapped or murdered! And sometimes the victim commits murder (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/07/20/419_shooting/).

Tog
2007-Jun-15, 08:46 AM
I feel cheated, The scam I got about money in Iraq was only 15 million. But min did mention, in passing, that 2 nukes were in the same bunker.

Paul Beardsley
2007-Jun-15, 09:23 AM
Perhaps we could pull a scam. Send out lots of e-mail to people saying the moonlandings were faked, and if they send us some money we'll lift the lid on it once and for all. Include a link to the BAUT FAQ so that intelligent, open-minded people will realise it's a scam, and only the entrenched HBs will fall for it.

Then, with the money we make, we could pay for a probe to go to Europa!

Seriously, though, these scams are disgusting.

jfribrg
2007-Jun-15, 03:54 PM
Like everyone else in the world who has an email address, I have received my share of 419 emails. I also once received an unsolicited IM from an African princess. I played along for a while, and when "she" finally got around to telling me about her ill-gotten fortune and asked me to help, I said I would be happy to but first she would need to send me a small amount of good-faith money to make sure that she is for real. That didnt stop her though. She explained that i needed to send the good-faith money. Finally I got tired of the game and told her that she is a lousy con artist and not to quit her day job. Even that didn't stop her. She insisted that she was legit. Why she continued after that is a mystery to me. She should have known at that point that there was zero chance of getting any money from me, but she kept wasting her time anyway.

tofu
2007-Jun-15, 04:00 PM
I feel cheated, The scam I got about money in Iraq was only 15 million. But min did mention, in passing, that 2 nukes were in the same bunker.

There's another one that very casually mentions torturing Iraqis, like "yeah it was our lunch break so we were torturing these Iraqi guys"

I love the mentality of the person who wrote that one. "Americans will send me money if I pretend to be a soldier who commits war crimes." Good plan buddy.

Toseek, I recommend that you registered an anonymous email account somewhere and reply to this message that you don't believe the guy. Request that he send you a photo of himself in uniform. It would be interesting to see who's photo he sends you.

Roy Batty
2007-Jun-15, 04:13 PM
As they say on the UK series Hustle: "You can never a con an honest man" ... well I'm sure you can if he's naive enough but it's used as a premise to make the con artists seem the good guys :)

Moose
2007-Jun-15, 05:14 PM
My favorite reverse scam is the "Cthulhu mythos" prank, which you'll find here (http://www.geocities.com/steerp1ke/David_Ehi.html).

Matherly
2007-Jun-15, 07:05 PM
My favorite reverse scam is the "Cthulhu mythos" prank, which you'll find here (http://www.geocities.com/steerp1ke/David_Ehi.html).

BWHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. Oh man, you need a warning not to read that at work if you don't want your co-workers looking at you funny.

jfribrg
2007-Jun-15, 07:27 PM
My favorite reverse scam is the "Cthulhu mythos" prank, which you'll find here (http://www.geocities.com/steerp1ke/David_Ehi.html).

My favorite is this (http://www.419eater.com/html/joe_eboh.htm) one.

m1omg
2007-Jun-15, 08:33 PM
I hate spam.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-15, 08:36 PM
I hate spam.

Not even fried? :)

Matherly
2007-Jun-15, 08:46 PM
I hate spam.

Sshh, dear, don't cause a fuss. I'll have your spam. I love it. I'm having spam spam spam spam spam spam spam beaked beans spam spam spam and spam!

Donnie B.
2007-Jun-15, 09:11 PM
Sshh, dear, don't cause a fuss. I'll have your spam. I love it. I'm having spam spam spam spam spam spam spam beaked beans spam spam spam and spam!I hate beaked beans. The darn beaks keep getting caught in my throat.

Matherly
2007-Jun-15, 09:19 PM
I hate beaked beans. The darn beaks keep getting caught in my throat.

Well, you could always substitue Spam.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-15, 09:40 PM
I hate spam.

Sorry m1omg, your country probably doesn't have Spam. If it doesn't, consider yourself lucky. :sick:

Spam (food): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAM_%28food%29

Moose
2007-Jun-15, 10:42 PM
My favorite is this (http://www.419eater.com/html/joe_eboh.htm) one.

I have a new favorite. :D

Lianachan
2007-Jun-15, 11:04 PM
There's a part of me that feels that most people who fall for such a scam... well, deserve to.

EDITED AFTERTHOUGHT: Spam, as in that sort of email, is always "Spam" or "spam". "SPAM" is a vigorously defended trademark.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-15, 11:13 PM
EDITED AFTERTHOUGHT: Spam, as in that sort of email, is always "Spam" or "spam". "SPAM" is a vigorously defended trademark.

A SPAM expert. This may come in handy some time . . . . :)

Lianachan
2007-Jun-15, 11:17 PM
A SPAM expert. This may come in handy some time . . . . :)

As unlikely as it may sound, it's something I looked into at work - when the IT department used a photograph of a tin of SPAM as part of an announcement about anti-spam measures being implemented. I pointed out the difference between SPAM and spam, and directed them to documented cases where the legal owners of the SPAM brand had taken companies to court for using pictures of their products when discussing spam emails. The announcement, on the corporate intranet, was changed within minutes.

:)

EDITED AFTERTHOUGHT - Presumably any expert knowledge I have about SPAM comes fom my partial "Viking" ancestry :)

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-15, 11:25 PM
As unlikely as it may sound, it's something I looked into at work - when the IT department used a photograph of a tin of SPAM as part of an announcement about anti-spam measures being implemented. I pointed out the difference between SPAM and spam, and directed them to documented cases where the legal owners of the SPAM brand had taken companies to court for using pictures of their products when discussing spam emails. The announcement, on the corporate intranet, was changed within minutes.

:)

Just teasing. No one should ever take me seriously because no one ever has. :)

Lianachan
2007-Jun-16, 12:01 AM
My favorite is this (http://www.419eater.com/html/joe_eboh.htm) one.

I am especially fond of the Western Union form on page four, featuring questions like "Spell 'kleptomaniac'" and "Why do birds suddenly appear every time you are near?".

Moose
2007-Jun-16, 12:12 AM
Presumably any expert knowledge I have about SPAM comes fom my partial "Viking" ancestry :)

"Vikings (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hM7HaF_9y6Q). Also good. Big on pillaging."